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Haddock

Coconut cool hardiness

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Haddock

Out of all the coconut varieties in the world, which one would you say can handle cool temps for the longest?

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EastCanadaTropicals

Maybe indian tall? Havent tried one yet, but it's worth a shot in the summer.

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climate change virginia

none they all need a tropical environment 

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PalmatierMeg

Agree: none. A coconut may tolerate cool temps, i.e., below 60-70F for a few hours or a day or so. But they insist on long term sun and heat (over 80F). Their roots require warm ground. Cool air temps for any extended period lead to cold ground.

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Haddock
2 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Agree: none. A coconut may tolerate cool temps, i.e., below 60-70F for a few hours or a day or so. But they insist on long term sun and heat (over 80F). Their roots require warm ground. Cool air temps for any extended period lead to cold ground.

Indian tall coconuts though?

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EastCanadaTropicals
4 minutes ago, Haddock said:

Indian tall coconuts though?

I was also thinking fiji dwarf. But yeah, no coconuts will survive cool temps for too long.

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PalmatierMeg
3 minutes ago, Haddock said:

Indian tall coconuts though?

I have no idea but I doubt it. Good luck finding one. A cold/cool hardy coconut is the holy grail of palmdom. No one has found it yet.

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Haddock
3 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

I have no idea but I doubt it. Good luck finding one. A cold/cool hardy coconut is the holy grail of palmdom. No one has found it yet.

Honesty I’m not even sure if Indian tall coconuts exist. I’ve never seen any pictures of it and either way it would be hard to get a different coconut cultivar out of India into countries like the US. 

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PalmatierMeg
2 hours ago, Haddock said:

Honesty I’m not even sure if Indian tall coconuts exist. I’ve never seen any pictures of it and either way it would be hard to get a different coconut cultivar out of India into countries like the US. 

Be aware that since covid US Customs has cracked down big time on plant imports from all over the world. They can x-ray packages to see what's inside and look for required phytosanitary certificates and source country gov't paperwork. They seize and destroy stuff without it. Most foreign plant sellers do not offer any of that required paperwork and tell you it's your fault if plants are seized and you should have known better. Be prepared to pay extra to get phytos. Finally, do not put your faith in foreign sellers to sell you that Indian Tall if they even know what one is.

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PalmTreeDude

I don’t think that there are any coconuts that are truly cool hardy. They need constant warm weather in order to thrive. You’ll see pictures of them in California along the coast and they tend not to look too great, and there are a few pictures of them in the desert where they get daytime heat year round but it’s really dry and occasional freezes can really beat them up, even the nights seem to get quite cool in the winter which doesn’t help. I’ve left my potted ones out with highs in the 70s and upper 60s and lows in the 40s but they didn’t like it being like that for long. 

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kinzyjr

During this winter, my coconut beds didn't get anywhere below 32F but we did have some frost and a long stretches of below average temperatures.  None of them perished, but out of all of them, the Maypan looks the best.  Below are the December 2020, January 2021, and February 2021 weather records from weather.com for reference.

 

2020_Dec_LakelandFL_weather.png

2021_Jan_LakelandFL_weather.png

2021_Feb_LakelandFL_weather.png

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Patrick Sheehan

Definitely parajubaea cocoides

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DCA_Palm_Fan

For any long term survival, zone 10A at minimum.   They may survive in 9B for a time, but they wont thrive, and wont be long term plants.    Cold air is bad, cold or even cool ground is worse.   

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Mr. Coconut Palm

The pure (non hybrid) Indian Tall from north central India around New Delhi, the pure Mexican Tall from the Gulf Coast of Mexico, and the pure Green Variety of Hawaiian Tall (not the Golden Variety so often shipped as sprouts to the mainland by people who order baby Coconut Palms from Hawaii), and one from the inland areas around Hong Kong (not sure of the variety name) are probably the most cold/cool hardy varieties in the world.  Just like with other species of tropical trees and plants, there are some varieties of Coconut Palms THAT ARE slightly more cold and cool hardy than others!  Out of the 3 Malayan Dwarf varieties, the Green Malayan Dwarf is the most cold/cool hardy,  followed by the Golden Variety.  The Yellow Malayan Dwarf is the LEAST cold/cool hardy of the 3 Malayan Dwarfs, but Wow, those bright yellow petioles and nuts it produces!  The pure Jamaican Tall is also a more cold/cool hardy variety, as there are some old mature ones in coastal central Florida that have survived some pretty bad freezes and prolongded cold periods in Central Florida over the last few decades.  I would like to get some mature viable nuts from these palms!  Panama Tall is said to be a slightly more cold hardy/cool hardy variety, and out of the hybrids that us in the mainland U.S. may be able to more readily get our hands on, the Maypan, is said to be slightly more cold/cool hardy, and the Maymex Hybrid (cross between a Malayan Dwarf and a Mexican Tall, with the best of these being a cross between the Green Malayan and a Mexican Tall, followed by a cross between the Golden Malayan and Mexican Tall; many of the sprouts from nuts washed up on the beaches of South Texas turn out to be Maymex Hybrids), and then a Mayjam Hybrid cross between a Green Malayan and Jamaican Tall followed by a Mayjam cross between a Golden Malayan and Jamaican Tall.  I have heard that the pure Fiji Dwarf may be somewhat more cold/cool hardy than what you might expect, considering it is native to such a super tropical island area of the South Pacific.

John

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Xerarch
On 4/20/2021 at 5:24 AM, Haddock said:

Out of all the coconut varieties in the world, which one would you say can handle cool temps for the longest?

I guess it matters why you're asking, if you are asking with anywhere in SC in mind like for where you live, forget it.  Refer to all the comments that say that none have any cool hardiness, because indeed, none have enough cool hardiness to last anywhere in South Carolina even if you protected it from freezes.  If you're asking for a friend in central Florida or something and you just want one with a slightly better chance of lasting through the next cold snap, refer to the above comments about which ones might be slightly better in cool temps, and as others have suggested, good luck finding the Indian tall.  If you get some let us know, I would like to try one. 

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Haddock
11 minutes ago, Xerarch said:

I guess it matters why you're asking, if you are asking with anywhere in SC in mind like for where you live, forget it.  Refer to all the comments that say that none have any cool hardiness, because indeed, none have enough cool hardiness to last anywhere in South Carolina even if you protected it from freezes.  If you're asking for a friend in central Florida or something and you just want one with a slightly better chance of lasting through the next cold snap, refer to the above comments about which ones might be slightly better in cool temps, and as others have suggested, good luck finding the Indian tall.  If you get some let us know, I would like to try one. 

Oh heh I forgot about this thread but I meant it in general, not as to if they could survive in a specific area. Was just wondering then what coconut varieties could take the longest amount of cool weather. Thanks 

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Mr. Coconut Palm

There are varieties that grow at higher cooler elevations, even somewhat chilly nights in places like Guadalajara, Mexico.  So, nuts from these palms, and the Green Hawaiian Talls grown above 3,000 ft. elevations in Hawaii, should be somewhat more cool hardy than other varieties.  I have been told by a friend of mine, who spent quite some time in Guadalajara, Mexico, and the nearby Lake Chapala (I think that's the name of it), that were tall Mature Coconut Palms there with some small to medium sized nuts on them.  Not sure what variety, but most probably a Tall variety.  The nights there in wintertime, frequently get down into the 40'sF from what I understand, with days around 70F in the wintertime.  I am not sure if the nuts on any of those palms are large enough, though to be viable.   If so, they would be HIGHLY SOUGHT AFTER nuts!!!

John

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