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teddytn

I started these three rostratas from seed in 2014, at that point I was in the hunt for any cool looking plants that would survive in Tennessee. I had no idea if they would survive long term, but so far they have shown no winter damage over the years. Thought I would share some pics! The first pic is in 2015 when I planted them and the most recent is from last week.

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Darold Petty

Very nice, congratulations !  :greenthumb:

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Silas_Sancona

 Seedling to practically trunking, in roughly 6.. years, from seed.. Very impressed!

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amh

A great progression series, very nice plants.

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teddytn
47 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

 Seedling to practically trunking, in roughly 6.. years, from seed.. Very impressed!

I think they’re cool, I’m super happy with how fast they’ve grown! 

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teddytn

I always get the itch to go to Florida and hang out with some big palms, but I think next I want to take a road trip to the desert and see some yuccas, agaves, and saguaros in person

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Palmensammler

Amazing how quickly they have grown that all in just 6 years. They have a very beautiful color. You must be proud of them.

What is your typicall climate?

Eckhard

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teddytn
2 minutes ago, Palmensammler said:

Amazing how quickly they have grown that all in just 6 years. They have a very beautiful color. You must be proud of them.

What is your typicall climate?

Eckhard

I usually see the best and worst of weather in the U.S. Our winters are wet and cold, we see at least an 1” of ice and usually snow every year, full on ground freeze. The summers are hot and humid, most days from June to September are close to or over 90* F and 100% humidity.

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Silas_Sancona
20 minutes ago, teddytn said:

I always get the itch to go to Florida and hang out with some big palms, but I think next I want to take a road trip to the desert and see some yuccas, agaves, and saguaros in person

Have done trips to.. and lived in both places. Florida is great for experiencing the tropical stuff / things from the dry areas of the Caribbean ( once you start looking around areas full of natives.. S. FL and the Keys esp.. )

Arizona, New Mexico, and ..pretty much every part of Texas west / south of Austin/ San Antonio, and of course the deserts / hot, inland areas in CA. are a world all their own.. Then of course, there is Mexico and Baja..  Where the really neat stuff grows.

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teddytn
4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Have done trips to.. and lived in both places. Florida is great for experiencing the tropical stuff / things from the dry areas of the Caribbean ( once you start looking around areas full of natives.. S. FL and the Keys esp.. )

Arizona, New Mexico, and ..pretty much every part of Texas west / south of Austin/ San Antonio, and of course the deserts / hot, inland areas in CA. are a world all their own.. Then of course, there is Mexico and Baja..  Where the really neat stuff grows.

I need to do it, I get so busy with work and the time slips by. When I’m ready to go I might harass you for some places to check out! 
Since we’re on the topic, you ever seen a native stand of rostratas in the wild?

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, teddytn said:

I need to do it, I get so busy with work and the time slips by. When I’m ready to go I might harass you for some places to check out! 
Since we’re on the topic, you ever seen a native stand of rostratas in the wild?

Understand that.. felt the same way when i lived in Ohio and was working a job i wasn't thrilled to have. Being close enough, it gave me the chance to make a trip to FL and Texas where someone i'd known was going to school.  Trips to AZ ( from where i grew up in CA ) were made to do in person research of various things, and pick up plants you can't find where i lived. 

Not rostrata, which grows inside Big Bend Nat. Park, and just south of there in Mexico ..but there are plenty of other trunk-forming Yucca to observe in habitat out here. West Texas itself has several species as well.

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teddytn
39 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Understand that.. felt the same way when i lived in Ohio and was working a job i wasn't thrilled to have. Being close enough, it gave me the chance to make a trip to FL and Texas where someone i'd known was going to school.  Trips to AZ ( from where i grew up in CA ) were made to do in person research of various things, and pick up plants you can't find where i lived. 

Not rostrata, which grows inside Big Bend Nat. Park, and just south of there in Mexico ..but there are plenty of other trunk-forming Yucca to observe in habitat out here. West Texas itself has several species as well.

That’s a great idea, next trip I make I need to scout out some local nurseries wherever I go so I can pick up some plants. Wife will not be happy I’m sure. Roll back with a load of plants packed in the back with the kids lol

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Silas_Sancona
17 minutes ago, teddytn said:

That’s a great idea, next trip I make I need to scout out some local nurseries wherever I go so I can pick up some plants. Wife will not be happy I’m sure. Roll back with a load of plants packed in the back with the kids lol

As i used to tell an ex- girlfriend who wasn't a plant fan/ thought it was a waste, ( Don't get me started on her hang ups, lol!! )  ..other people who've given me grief,  " look at it this way, i could be spending money on far worse things.. "

You can always put the kids up on the roof on any trips.. more room for plants!, lol.. In all seriousness, Trips like this would be a great way to teach respect for the environment.. Not to be afraid of spiky / spiny things, etc..

Can't really speak for Texas ( there are a few i've looked over near San Antonio though ) but out this way, Tucson is Cacti/ Succulent Mecca.. Numerous great places to check out.. Some mail order places in Colorado/ New Mexico for starter plants/ seeds as well.

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Palmensammler
2 hours ago, teddytn said:

That’s a great idea, next trip I make I need to scout out some local nurseries wherever I go so I can pick up some plants. Wife will not be happy I’m sure. Roll back with a load of plants packed in the back with the kids lol

That's the situation we all know very well I asume. I grow most of my plants from seed and always when there is a new parcel arriving, the eyes of my wife are rolling and she tells me that I love my plants more than her.....

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teddytn
3 hours ago, Palmensammler said:

That's the situation we all know very well I asume. I grow most of my plants from seed and always when there is a new parcel arriving, the eyes of my wife are rolling and she tells me that I love my plants more than her.....

So true for everyone! I’m interested in what you’re growing in Germany, I’ve flown into Leipzig many times, very cold in the winter if I remember correctly. What is the weather like where you are? 

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Palmensammler

Hi, I'm living in the southwest of Germany so maybe the climate is a little bit better. But during winter time temps regualary fall down to -10°C / 14°F. This winter we hit -15,2°C / 4,6°F. But this happens only every ten years (I hope).

I'm growing Trachies, S. minor, R. hystrix Yuccas,  Agaves and Cacti outside. A lot more Chamaedoreas inside / outside during sumer and a few other common palms in pots.Trachies.thumb.jpg.2d7ea4904e21a9d4392bf9477aeaf680.jpg

Trachies after -15°C/5°F

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Some Agaves (harvardiana, parryi couesii and p. huachucensis and megalacantha) and all unprotected during winter. As well som small cacti (Pediocactus and Echinocereus triglochidiatus inermis

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Yucca glauca x linearifolia (cross from Denmark)

And many more....

But I'm always on the hunt for new seeds.

Eckhard

Edited by Palmensammler
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teddytn
1 hour ago, Palmensammler said:

Hi, I'm living in the southwest of Germany so maybe the climate is a little bit better. But during winter time temps regualary fall down to -10°C / 14°F. This winter we hit -15,2°C / 4,6°F. But this happens only every ten years (I hope).

I'm growing Trachies, S. minor, R. hystrix Yuccas,  Agaves and Cacti outside. A lot more Chamaedoreas inside / outside during sumer and a few other common palms in pots.Trachies.thumb.jpg.2d7ea4904e21a9d4392bf9477aeaf680.jpg

Trachies after -15°C/5°F

20210413_194745.thumb.jpg.4380042e6e3e8849166becc399bc2b9f.jpg

Some Agaves (harvardiana, parryi couesii and p. huachucensis and megalacantha) and all unprotected during winter. As well som small cacti (Pediocactus and Echinocereus triglochidiatus inermis

20210413_194852.thumb.jpg.68135becc38d8f68284542c944f1146c.jpg

Yucca glauca x linearifolia (cross from Denmark)

And many more....

But I'm always on the hunt for new seeds.

Eckhard

I’m jealous of the agaves, the winters are too wet here for agaves outside. The Trachies look great as well!!!

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Silas_Sancona
20 minutes ago, teddytn said:

I’m jealous of the agaves, the winters are too wet here for agaves outside. The Trachies look great as well!!!

You might look into selections grown/ sold by Plant Delights Nursery.. Though honestly they're not the cheapest place to source plants from..

Some of the Agave Eckhard is growing come from mid to higher elevation areas out here where it is typically cooler, and they receive moisture both in winter ( rain/ snow melt ) and in summer ( during Monsoon storms ) Believe it or not but, for the most part, outside of those grown in yards,  there are no ( or very few ) Agave growing naturally in the lowest elevations around Phoenix, or further west.. simply too hot / dry.. Have to gain roughly another 1K ft before you start seeing them dotting the landscape.  I actually made the false assumption they'd survive in full sun in my front yard.. lost every one i'd planted.

Also think if you provided raised beds w/ soil ( well, mainly grit/ gravel actually ) that allows excess water to drain off quickly, you might do fine with at least some of the tougher Agave.. among other things.

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ColumbusPalm

They look awesome! Can't wait for mine to get that big. 

 

Mine just got through its first winter unscathed. I am in Z6a in Ohio and built a structure around it with burlap and a clear tarp top to keep the crown dry. Do you do anything like that or are they exposed to the wet winters? Now that mine is in the second growing season I am wondering if I need to protect next year. 

image0-2.jpeg

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teddytn
34 minutes ago, ColumbusPalm said:

They look awesome! Can't wait for mine to get that big. 

 

Mine just got through its first winter unscathed. I am in Z6a in Ohio and built a structure around it with burlap and a clear tarp top to keep the crown dry. Do you do anything like that or are they exposed to the wet winters? Now that mine is in the second growing season I am wondering if I need to protect next year. 

image0-2.jpeg

I’ve never protected them at all, the raised bed they’re in is the fastest draining mix I could make, that helps, but they are fully exposed to the elements. @Silas_Sancona may have a better idea of the limit of their cold hardiness? 

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teddytn
40 minutes ago, ColumbusPalm said:

They look awesome! Can't wait for mine to get that big. 

 

Mine just got through its first winter unscathed. I am in Z6a in Ohio and built a structure around it with burlap and a clear tarp top to keep the crown dry. Do you do anything like that or are they exposed to the wet winters? Now that mine is in the second growing season I am wondering if I need to protect next year. 

image0-2.jpeg

In my experience having multiple plants of the same species there’s always wimpier and tougher plants in the group. I’ve got one that is separate from those I’ll take a pic and post it. It’s growing in amended native clay in the ground, not sure how much that plays a factor. The wimpy one was grown from seed from the same batch as the others. My point is, your plant looks to be of the tougher quality, good color after winter, super erect leaves, leaf tips still green. It may shrug winter off where you’re at!! The one in this picture is the same age and half the size.

494EA288-618C-446A-A87F-7B6F6AFBBAF1.jpeg

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Silas_Sancona
12 minutes ago, teddytn said:

I’ve never protected them at all, the raised bed they’re in is the fastest draining mix I could make, that helps, but they are fully exposed to the elements. @Silas_Sancona may have a better idea of the limit of their cold hardiness? 

Zone 5 is the supposed limit, especially once they gain some size.. In Ohio, might shelter, but not fully enclose.. in winter until a little bigger than it is currently, just to play it safe.  any snow that falls on it will help insulate it as well. The soil it is planted in ( how well it drains ) will play a big factor in keeping it healthy.  A little clay in the soil won't hurt as long as it isn't too dense/ stays sopping wet for long periods of time.
 

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teddytn
9 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Zone 5 is the supposed limit, especially once they gain some size.. In Ohio, might shelter, but not fully enclose.. in winter until a little bigger than it is currently, just to play it safe.  any snow that falls on it will help insulate it as well. The soil it is planted in ( how well it drains ) will play a big factor in keeping it healthy.  A little clay in the soil won't hurt as long as it isn't too dense/ stays sopping wet for long periods of time.
 

Thank you sir!

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ColumbusPalm

Thank you for the info, it helps a lot.  I dug a small grave out of there, about a 4x3 area and 2ft down and made the entire bed a mix of clay, rocks, sand, vermiculite and peat/potting soil. It may still be small enough to protect the same way but I was thinking about when it starts getting the size of yours, what my options would be. Sounds like I can just let it be which is awesome. They are stunners. Even the wimpy one looks cool. 

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Manalto

Thanks for posting these photos, very impressive. Rostratas are beautiful.

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teddytn
On 4/20/2021 at 7:53 PM, ColumbusPalm said:

Thank you for the info, it helps a lot.  I dug a small grave out of there, about a 4x3 area and 2ft down and made the entire bed a mix of clay, rocks, sand, vermiculite and peat/potting soil. It may still be small enough to protect the same way but I was thinking about when it starts getting the size of yours, what my options would be. Sounds like I can just let it be which is awesome. They are stunners. Even the wimpy one looks cool. 

You’ve got it started right then, high and dry is best in the winter for sure. Mine have been covered with 2” of ice almost every year since they’ve been planted and they haven’t shown a hint of damage. They’re tough as nails for sure

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teddytn

I didn’t realize how much of that bed was being occupied by just leaves, it’s been years since I’ve seen it like that. I’ve been so inspired by seeing @Silas_Sancona pictures and hearing that @Palmensammler has 200 different varieties of yuccas!!! Needed to make room to start planting some new stuff, maybe some agave and more cactus.....

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JLM

This thread has definitely made me more interested in Yuccas.

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teddytn
10 minutes ago, JLM said:

This thread has definitely made me more interested in Yuccas.

That’s awesome to hear, anywhere south of Tennessee would be bulletproof in a raised bed.

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Palmensammler
5 hours ago, JLM said:

This thread has definitely made me more interested in Yuccas.

Be warned. Once you're infected you will start collecting Yuccas like mad. That's how it began about 12 years ago for me. :yay:

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Palmensammler
5 hours ago, teddytn said:

That’s awesome to hear, anywhere south of Tennessee would be bulletproof in a raised bed.

Frequently I'm contact with a guy from Massachusetts who grows a lot of Yuccas outside and creates rare hybrids. Sometimes I receive seeds from him. But I haven't seen him here on PT.

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teddytn
7 hours ago, Palmensammler said:

Be warned. Once you're infected you will start collecting Yuccas like mad. That's how it began about 12 years ago for me. :yay:

I realized after we talked the other day I might have more yuccas than I thought....just filamentosa and a variegated filamentosa. I might have the infection!!!

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