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aztropic

Arizona's answer to Florida's silver trumpet tree

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aztropic

In Arizona,the native palo verde tree puts on a spectacular display of yellow flowers every spring. Can be breathtaking to see some of them in person. It's green bark also aids in photosynthesis.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

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Reyes Vargas

Those are sights to see in person.  We have those here in the RGV as well.  We also have the sweet acacia, although not as showy as the palo verde they make up for it with the sweet smell.

Edited by Reyes Vargas
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Silas_Sancona
5 minutes ago, Reyes Vargas said:

Those are sites to see in person.  We have those here in the RGV as well.  We also have the sweet acacia, although not as showy as the palo verde they make up for it with the sweet smell.

You see both planted everywhere here. Sweet Acacia planted directly across the street finish up just as the P.V.s start flowering.  Agree the smell of the Acacia is nice wafting into the house in the evening when the windows are open. There's another form that flowers earlier than others.. Often starting in January, finishing up as the standard form flowers.  Stays much smaller /denser as well.

A few of the many flowering P.V.s in the neighborhood on this side of town, and they're just getting started:
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Silas_Sancona

Another pop of mid-spring color for the desert, though you don't see these planted quite as much as Palo Verde and Mesquite. Some of the bigger Bauhinia variegata i've come across in east Chandler, near downtown.  Yea they're seedy compared to Hong Kongs, and can look a bit frazzled by the time it starts to cool off in October, but can't beat that pop of White and hot Pink compared to the usual Yellow.  Should be used more in commercial landscapes in town.

There are a few B. variegata in a yard around the corner from me but they're kept smaller, roughly no taller the roof gutter, but look quite nice at that size.
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In an area they all can be grown, can picture a large landscape design incorporating these, Yellow and Pink Tabebuia, certain Palo Verde ( those that are flowery, but won't get too big ), Jacaranda, and Royal Poinciana for quite a spring show. 


 

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Fusca

I've got two Palo Verde planted here in my yard.  First one I planted grew to about 12' but it has not come back yet from the freeze event and don't think it is going to.  Not a trace of green on it.  But a smaller one I grew from seed that is only about 4' tall is doing just fine.  Not really sure why that is.  There's plenty of them growing wild around here and seems like our color show is going to be delayed this year.

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