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Teegurr

Guerrilla gardening?

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Teegurr

I'm strongly considering guerrilla gardening on public land to spread the palm joy (like in a park, or road medians). Is that a bad idea? Has anyone else done this before? If so, share some pictures!

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UK_Palms

I have numerous Chamaerops, Phoenix, Washingtonia & Queen seedlings that i am going to need to thin down to my better specimens. I'm probably going to guerrilla plant about 10 Chamaerops seedlings, 5 Phoenix seedlings, 5 Washingtonia and 2-3 Santa Catarina Queen seedlings. And that's at the bare minimum. I could easily double or triple that number, if I decide to guerrilla plant more. I will probably document it on here when I plant them out next month.

One interesting question that I have... Do deer eat young palm seedlings? Like will it be necessary to protect smaller plants with wire cages when they are young? I have heard of deer eating anything from acorn tree shoots to poison oak, prickle bushes and even stinging nettles. So I'm pretty sure that a deer could eat a palm seedling...? Or do they tend to leave them alone? Surely someone has experience in this? Anyone lost palms to deer? 

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amh
26 minutes ago, UK_Palms said:

One interesting question that I have... Do deer eat young palm seedlings? Like will it be necessary to protect smaller plants with wire cages when they are young? I have heard of deer eating anything from acorn tree shoots to poison oak, prickle bushes and even stinging nettles. So I'm pretty sure that a deer could eat a palm seedling...? Or do they tend to leave them alone? Surely someone has experience in this? Anyone lost palms to deer? 

I've had deer browse palms, but they have not killed any, yet. Due to an over population I grow everything in cages, but if they can reach something with their tongue, they will take a bite and attempt to pull the plants through the fencing.

49 minutes ago, Teegurr said:

I'm strongly considering guerrilla gardening on public land to spread the palm joy (like in a park, or road medians). Is that a bad idea? Has anyone else done this before? If so, share some pictures!

I intend to overtly plant a few palms in public space this year, but when my Sabal minors reach fruiting age, I will be dispersing seeds throughout the region.

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Collectorpalms

There are plenty of Native Sabal Minors in Brazos county you can get seed from this fall.

i think palmetto and filifera should be spread around. 

Edited by Collectorpalms
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amh

Sabal uresana would be a good addition too. It would probably grow like a weed south east of San Antonio and Austin.

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96720

In Phoenix that would probably be impossible because of water but that is how my jungle grows seeds drop and grow sometimes I see them and pull them out other times I just let them grow even if my wife thinks they are too close that’s why I have a jungle!!

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PricklyPearSATC
21 hours ago, Teegurr said:

I'm strongly considering guerrilla gardening on public land to spread the palm joy (like in a park, or road medians). Is that a bad idea? Has anyone else done this before? If so, share some pictures!

Just make sure the area is not frequently mowed! 

TXDot, installs Sabal Mexicana here, so College Station is also good.  Just find a protected area that doesn't get mowed.

You can barely see the top fronds of a Washy touching this left railing in the this city park area.  I always think this Washy is guerilla gardening.  If this city planted it, it would probably have been in the open area. 

Go for it! 

Screenshot_2021-04-10 Google Maps.png

Edited by PricklyPearSATC
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Fusca
2 hours ago, PricklyPearSATC said:

Just make sure the area is not frequently mowed! 

I recently planted a Sabal palmetto seedling outside the office building where I work on Lackland AFB.  It was away from where the grass would get mowed but it ended up getting run over by someone on a 4-wheeler!  :angry:

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amh
1 hour ago, Fusca said:

I recently planted a Sabal palmetto seedling outside the office building where I work on Lackland AFB.  It was away from where the grass would get mowed but it ended up getting run over by someone on a 4-wheeler!  :angry:

the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.

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Teegurr
4 hours ago, PricklyPearSATC said:

Just make sure the area is not frequently mowed! 

TXDot, installs Sabal Mexicana here, so College Station is also good.  Just find a protected area that doesn't get mowed.

You can barely see the top fronds of a Washy touching this left railing in the this city park area.  I always think this Washy is guerilla gardening.  If this city planted it, it would probably have been in the open area. 

Go for it! 

Screenshot_2021-04-10 Google Maps.png

I'm thinking/planning to put a P. canariensis seedling behind a community gardening plot in Bee Creek Park. The area is really secluded and hidden, but it's full sun. I hope no one disturbs it, but it really doesn't look like a place that's mowed at all. 

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Palmfarmer

I Planted 2 Sabal causiarum seedlings, 2 Small dates, some agaves and a Mango tree on the road behind my house. Within 3 weeks all was stolen except the agaves. My neighboor contacted police and they put up a checkpoint nearby and arrested 4 people stealing plants along the park and the road behind my house haha. Just outside my house on the front i have not had anything stolen, bad people took a knife to a really nice agave a had and split all the fronds the 3 days i was out of town 

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PricklyPearSATC
48 minutes ago, Teegurr said:

I'm thinking/planning to put a P. canariensis seedling behind a community gardening plot in Bee Creek Park. The area is really secluded and hidden, but it's full sun. I hope no one disturbs it, but it really doesn't look like a place that's mowed at all. 

It depends on the city and what they think of the palm..LOL
I noticed that there is a butterfly garden.  CIDP casts considerable shade.    I would make sure that it is far enough away from the community garden that it does not shade the garden. 

I often see washies near community gardens. 

Edited by PricklyPearSATC

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Palmfarmer

the coolest would be to do it on some really small island in the ocean or on a lake

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Teegurr
28 minutes ago, PricklyPearSATC said:

It depends on the city and what they think of the palm..LOL
I noticed that there is a butterfly garden.  CIDP casts considerable shade.    I would make sure that it is far enough away from the community garden that it does not shade the garden. 

I often see washies near community gardens. 

Well the butterfly garden is not the same as the community garden. The CIDP proposed space like 150 feet away in a forest clearing lol. But the spot might be like 20 ft from the community garden. It's sort of neglected to be honest. I think I'll go over there tomorrow and plant. The area around the butterfly garden looks to be mowed unfortunately.

Edited by Teegurr
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aztropic

I've found that empty parking lot tree squares make good spots for guerrilla planting. They usually have or had drip systems installed, and the original planting has died for whatever reason. Sometimes,the landscapers will eventually remove your planting, and some times, they actually get stolen if too unusual for the area.Out of 18 one gallon size palms I grew from seed and planted 15 years ago at local parking lots,5 palms are still alive to this day. :rolleyes:

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

 

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Palmarum

I've planted stuff all over the place. Mostly it was done by throwing seed or planting just-germinating seedlings. Anything larger would attract attention, thus having it being stolen or instantly removed.

Most didn't make it, as they either were removed, mowed, weed-whacked, Round-Up'd to oblivion, ran over or dried out. Lack of irrigation is the main issue, as most of the suitable planting areas (that would be ignored) are without irrigation. Prompting the 'donation' to be made during the rainy season, often while it was raining and usually at night.

I tried to pick species that I knew wouldn't grow too fast or flower and seed too prolifically so that they would become invasive. Something spiny and armed is nice, as it should have the ability to defend itself.

I never thought of going back to take photos, as I see them now and then. I wouldn't want to draw attention to the plants, short of having to photograph the entire median, parking lot, side yard, canal edge, etc.

I haven't gone 'midnight gardening' in a while, as there are cameras everywhere and someone will complain, just because they can. One such 'Johnny Palm seed' would have to dress the part, go during the day and at least look like you're supposed to be there.

Ryan

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Teegurr

Little P. canariensis is planted! It's approximately 18-20 feet away from the end of a community bed. I accidentally nicked off 1.5 inches of the end of its root when potting to a smaller size container, hope it will be ok. Good luck to this guy!

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Teegurr

By the way, check out this creek ecosystem. Wouldn't it be perfect for S. minor and C. radicalis?

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Edited by Teegurr
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Valhallalla

I have done some guerilla gardening mostly by tossing seeds from my own mature palms. Thrinax radiata produce abundant seed, germinate easily and are almost native to this area. I have probably tossed thousands of seeds in many places over the years. These are a few I know about that have sprouted. No doubt there are many more that I have not located. These have survived and are thriving without any supplemental irrigation. They get no maintenance other than the pleasure of my company when I visit them but they are in a fairly shady area so that helps.

I would like to guerilla some Coccothrinax argentata. I believe they were at one time native in this area. There are some growing naturally in other parts of coastal Broward County. I don't have access to a pile of seeds so I'm growing some along to plant out. 

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Valhallalla

I will call this semi-guerilla gardening. The beach I frequent has two miles of undeveloped coastline. Coconuts in various conditions land on the beach along with seaweed and debris. Sometimes they sprout and grow on their own, sometimes they need a little help. There was a ranger I knew many years ago who patrolled this beach. He told me how he would toss coconuts he though might be viable up into the dunes to hopefully sprout and grow. I have made a habit of doing the same thing while walking the beach and sometimes bury them if I can find a soft spot in the sand to dig with my bare hands.

These are two coconut palms that I found on the beach just starting to sprout. Knowing they wouldn't survive long on the open beach I relocated them a bit further from the water. The bigger, older one flowered for the first time this past year but produced no fruit. It is just starting to form a bit of trunk and develop that coconut lean. The smaller is a few years younger. They are totally exposed and receive no maintenance at all. They look a little shabby coming out of winter but are doing quite fine in this harsh environment.

I have planted a few other coconut sprouts and other beach visitors do so as well. There are many coconuts here that have obviously been planted by somebody besides myself. In the background of the first photo is one such youngster.

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Palmfarmer

Wish it rained more here so I could do this further from my house. Any Palms that could get survive on 529mm/20.83" Rain anually. Lets say i plant it in the rain season to give it some hope. There is many rivers and dams outside the city so planting them near the shoreline so they would have wet feet would be my best option i think.

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Steve the palmreader
On 4/9/2021 at 8:08 PM, Teegurr said:

I'm strongly considering guerrilla gardening on public land to spread the palm joy (like in a park, or road medians). Is that a bad idea? Has anyone else done this before? If so, share some pictures!

 Most of the time some parks and rec bureaucrat will have them removed

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Teegurr
9 minutes ago, Steve the palmreader said:

 Most of the time some parks and rec bureaucrat will have them removed

Good thing this one's hidden! (I think)

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amh
On 4/11/2021 at 8:47 AM, Teegurr said:

By the way, check out this creek ecosystem. Wouldn't it be perfect for S. minor and C. radicalis?

Go for it!

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Oviedo_z10b_lol
On 4/10/2021 at 10:39 PM, Palmfarmer said:

the coolest would be to do it on some really small island in the ocean or on a lake

I think someone did this on Marvin Key in the lower Florida Keys. It’s a small undeveloped island at the north edge of the archipelago, only accessible by boat. As you’d expect, it’s primarily mangroves, but right in the middle of the island is a large cocos nucifera. So either someone guerilla’d it, or a bird dropped it there and it sprouted. 
 

I’ll be down there in a couple months and get some pics. 

Edited by Oviedo_z10b_lol
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Teegurr

Just trying to make this planting seem a bit more "official." I found these wood logs about 100 feet from the planting site and dragged 'em over. Pretty sure they were extras from the community garden. They looked like they've been there a while so I hope it was OK to take a few lol. Like I said, the seedling's root was nicked a couple inches off and it's been 2.5 days since. Anyone got any idea of when I'd start to see the palm die if I mortally injured it (god forbid)? Came over and watered it with Bee Creek water, hope that's OK too. Alright, y'all have a good day now.

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Edited by Teegurr
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BayAndroid

Nah, j/k guys, I'm all for this. 

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ExperimentalGrower
On 4/9/2021 at 5:08 PM, Teegurr said:

I'm strongly considering guerrilla gardening on public land to spread the palm joy (like in a park, or road medians). Is that a bad idea? Has anyone else done this before? If so, share some pictures!

I know of someone surreptitiously planting Parajubaea torallyi in the forested hillsides of San Francisco. They seem to be ok without summer irrigation and it’s always a bit damp in SF due to fog so they look good. The hills are full of invasive Eucalyptus so no harm no foul. I wish this kind of thing was done more often in the urban jungle. Also now thinking about it there’s a guy I’d see all the time planting in medians in Oakland, a city that seriously needs some polishing along the roadways. He put in some nice Brugmansias that looked amazing.

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Reyes Vargas

A guy in North Carolina planted a robusta on an island.  I hope it makes it and grows huge.  We'll see.

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Teegurr
2 hours ago, Reyes Vargas said:

A guy in North Carolina planted a robusta on an island.  I hope it makes it and grows huge.  We'll see.

That guy is crazy in a good way! But I fear for that robusta. But yes, good luck little palm!

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Palmfarmer
2 hours ago, Teegurr said:

That guy is crazy in a good way! But I fear for that robusta. But yes, good luck little palm!

I think it got a good chance as long as it does not get removed/stolen

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Teegurr
6 hours ago, Palmfarmer said:

I think it got a good chance as long as it does not get removed/stolen

I don't. It's barely 8a over there.

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Reyes Vargas

Won't it being close to the water help it a little?  Or is it just to cold there that the water won't make much of a difference?

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Palmfarmer
15 hours ago, Teegurr said:

I don't. It's barely 8a over there.

Thing is that it is several old Robustas around the lake. Its a great Microclimate

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Palmfarmer
14 hours ago, Reyes Vargas said:

Won't it being close to the water help it a little?  Or is it just to cold there that the water won't make much of a difference?

In this case it will make a good difference since there is other old robustas around the lake that never gets protection. 

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Palmfarmer

However i Think it would be even better if he planted it in the portion of the Island with the trees to get some more protection and perhaps canopy.

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Teegurr
2 minutes ago, Palmfarmer said:

Thing is that it is several old Robustas around the lake. Its a great Microclimate

Oh F. I forgot about those. Yeah, that IS a REALLY good microclimate. Is he going to protect it in the winter? I wonder if those old Washys are protected?

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Palmfarmer
3 minutes ago, Teegurr said:

Oh F. I forgot about those. Yeah, that IS a REALLY good microclimate. Is he going to protect it in the winter? I wonder if those old Washys are protected?

He went filming there in February and there was no protection and he knows the owner of a 30 year old specimen around the lake

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RyManUtah

Strategic placement and proximity to water. If no water, plant somewhere you frequent and water yourself for a year or two. I forget otherwise.. Of course, it’s perfectly normal to walk around with a gallon of water in these parts. 
I mostly use filifera seeds. They’ll grow roots into nearby bushes, etc.  Sometimes, they get size to them and start getting trimmed: 

 

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