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Paradise Found

How easy is it to overwinter Ti plants in colder climates indoors?

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Palm Tree Jim

With a greenhouse, no problem.

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Paradise Found
40 minutes ago, Palm Tree Jim said:

With a greenhouse, no problem.

Thanks for the reply, my greenhouse isn't heated so I am left with indoor under lights and see what happens. 

I went ahead and ordered one Ti 'black magic' from Hawaii.  Will have to see what happens. Pic coming when I get it. 

Thanks! 

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Dartolution

They don't seem to be too difficult, in the winter they tend to drop a lot of leaves, and look sickly. Overwatering them can cause rot. 

But after you bring them out in the spring once it has warmed, they start perking back up. 

Biggest issue inside is leaf drop, spider mites (bad), and root rot if overwatered. 

 

 

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Paradise Found
9 minutes ago, Dartolution said:

They don't seem to be too difficult, in the winter they tend to drop a lot of leaves, and look sickly. Overwatering them can cause rot. 

But after you bring them out in the spring once it has warmed, they start perking back up. 

Biggest issue inside is leaf drop, spider mites (bad), and root rot if overwatered. 

 

 

Thanks,  Leaf drop is why I don't overwinter Crotons anymore.  But I'll keep what you said in mind for sure. I do have some spider mites spray so, time to put it to use come winter. Thanks!!!

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Dartolution
9 hours ago, Paradise Found said:

Thanks,  Leaf drop is why I don't overwinter Crotons anymore.  But I'll keep what you said in mind for sure. I do have some spider mites spray so, time to put it to use come winter. Thanks!!!

@Paradise Found I struggled with Crotons for years. I found that if you bring them in right before the cool weather gets here, put an oscillating fan on them, keep them around 68-84F and provide 50-60% humidity they won't leaf drop much if any at all. 

 

A lot of work I know, but doable. 

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Keys6505

I used to plant Ti plants in ground in 7a every summer and then dig them up and very unceremoniously jam them into a pot for the winter.  They'd stay overwinter in front of a window in a walkout basement that stayed about 60.  They looked almost dead every spring until I planted them back out and they'd come back to life.  More than once I'd think one was stone dead (crispy brown stump, no green visible anywhere) but I'd stick it in the ground anyway and they'd always pop back up.  I live in Houston now and still have one from my Jersey days and it froze to the ground in Feb but is already growing back.  They are tough as nails.

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Paradise Found
13 hours ago, Dartolution said:

@Paradise Found I struggled with Crotons for years. I found that if you bring them in right before the cool weather gets here, put an oscillating fan on them, keep them around 68-84F and provide 50-60% humidity they won't leaf drop much if any at all. 

 

A lot of work I know, but doable. 

That just might work for me... I overwinter my tender banana that way in a shed with grow lights and heat all winter the temp is mostly 60F or slightly warmer day and night and it does work. I also have tender bromeliads in there also. Thanks for bringing that up. 

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Paradise Found
12 hours ago, Keys6505 said:

I used to plant Ti plants in ground in 7a every summer and then dig them up and very unceremoniously jam them into a pot for the winter.  They'd stay overwinter in front of a window in a walkout basement that stayed about 60.  They looked almost dead every spring until I planted them back out and they'd come back to life.  More than once I'd think one was stone dead (crispy brown stump, no green visible anywhere) but I'd stick it in the ground anyway and they'd always pop back up.  I live in Houston now and still have one from my Jersey days and it froze to the ground in Feb but is already growing back.  They are tough as nails.

WOW back from the dead and still keep growing. My springs are not as warm as y'all. But I could put in the greenhouse once the temps go back into the 60's and 70's in Mid April. That should keep them happy and hopefully this works for me because I really do love ti plants. At least most of my cordylines I can plant in the ground all year. I only have two that are hardy to 9a rest are 8b hardy. 

Thanks for commenting about your experience gives me hope!  B)

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Dartolution
1 hour ago, Paradise Found said:

That just might work for me... I overwinter my tender banana that way in a shed with grow lights and heat all winter the temp is mostly 60F or slightly warmer day and night and it does work. I also have tender bromeliads in there also. Thanks for bringing that up. 

@Paradise Found I pop bromeliads into the landscape spring-frost here, and take no special care in overwintering them. I typically pull them up before the first frost in fall, wash them in a sink with a sponge and H2O2/water with a mild dish soap like dawn (only a few drops), rinse them in clean water and store them sitting on moistened sphagnum in a rubbermade bucket/tote. 

There they sit by the window until spring (usually late february/early march) and I take them out and pop them back into the landscape. 

If there is a frost predicted and the weather permits, Ill just typically throw a beach towel over them. 

Broms are exceedingly easy to deal with IME. (* By broms I mean Neoregelia, Guzmania, Vriesea, and Aechmea that I have *) 

 

I also agree with @Keys6505 Ti plants are "stump hardy." I've seen them come back from pretty bad desiccation and sitting in a dark cold basement for 4 months. 

- mind you, they don't look full and lush like in Hawaii, but they are still nice when they get going. 

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Keys6505
7 hours ago, Paradise Found said:

WOW back from the dead and still keep growing. My springs are not as warm as y'all. But I could put in the greenhouse once the temps go back into the 60's and 70's in Mid April. That should keep them happy and hopefully this works for me because I really do love ti plants. At least most of my cordylines I can plant in the ground all year. I only have two that are hardy to 9a rest are 8b hardy. 

Thanks for commenting about your experience gives me hope!  B)

My zombie Ti today about 7 weeks after 15deg unprotected.  This is the guy that I dug up for about 5 nj winters.  Not winning any beauty pageants, but still kickin!

20210411_180744.jpg

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Paradise Found
7 hours ago, Dartolution said:

@Paradise Found I pop bromeliads into the landscape spring-frost here, and take no special care in overwintering them. I typically pull them up before the first frost in fall, wash them in a sink with a sponge and H2O2/water with a mild dish soap like dawn (only a few drops), rinse them in clean water and store them sitting on moistened sphagnum in a rubbermade bucket/tote. 

There they sit by the window until spring (usually late february/early march) and I take them out and pop them back into the landscape. 

If there is a frost predicted and the weather permits, Ill just typically throw a beach towel over them. 

Broms are exceedingly easy to deal with IME. (* By broms I mean Neoregelia, Guzmania, Vriesea, and Aechmea that I have *) 

 

I also agree with @Keys6505 Ti plants are "stump hardy." I've seen them come back from pretty bad desiccation and sitting in a dark cold basement for 4 months. 

- mind you, they don't look full and lush like in Hawaii, but they are still nice when they get going. 

I just have my bromeliads in container that way I only have to store them inside with lights to keep them happy and they grow right through the winter.  Which is awesome and they also bloom to in winter. 

Sound like you give yours the spa treatment and a nice bed to relax all winter. Cool! 

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Paradise Found
1 hour ago, Keys6505 said:

My zombie Ti today about 7 weeks after 15deg unprotected.  This is the guy that I dug up for about 5 nj winters.  Not winning any beauty pageants, but still kickin!

20210411_180744.jpg

Man thanks for sharing the pic, that is awesome.  Mine would die from a late frost I bet. Not ready to risk it yet. lol.

 Do you know the name/color they will be?

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Dartolution

@Keys6505 That survived in the ground at 15degrees? WOW! I may have to seriously consider incorporating a few clearance red sisters into the landscape and see what happens! 

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Paradise Found

Hi everyone, 

So here is what I got a nice Ti 'Black Magic' had all its roots.  And, Ti 'Diamond Sunrise'.  

Here are some pics after planting. Very happy gardener now.  :D Last photo is nursery photo of Diamond Sunrise.. love the hot colors. 

 

 

IMG-0214.JPG

IMG-0217.JPG

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TI-15-Cordyline-Diamond-Sunrise.jpg

Edited by Paradise Found
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