Jump to content
PalmatierMeg

Huge Old 3-Trunked Cycad in Cape Coral, FL

Recommended Posts

PalmatierMeg

I've been admiring this huge cycad for nearly 30 years at the German American Social Club in Cape Coral, FL. It has 3 trunks and is about 15' tall and wide. I have no idea what genus and species it is so maybe someone can tell me. I've been meaning to take photos all these years but never had a camera close by. Today at our outdoor band rehearsal I got my chance.

Unknown Cycad, Cape Coral, FL

1255733920_3-TrunkCycadGASC0104-03-21.thumb.JPG.93e6447c391aad8d8485374006266426.JPG94728987_3-TrunkCycadGASC0204-03-21.thumb.JPG.af910f8101b7ad0fd275295d13d3f2db.JPGIMG_1747.thumb.JPG.3c453d05bebaaeb2cc5bb2a8a2e8e2b2.JPGIMG_1740.thumb.JPG.40dc46591f7a1c1fc9dba4d7136caeb3.JPGIMG_1745.thumb.JPG.c927664e4ed172b3e9e8568ff054c977.JPGIMG_1742.thumb.JPG.f774ffe9955d79413e063c2b90297cc1.JPGIMG_1743.thumb.JPG.459a41542abe5893f11f39f35f4a544e.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm Tree Jim

It appears to be a cycas species.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merlyn

That's an awesome Cycas, thanks for sharing!  I'd guess it's in the "Queen" group, Thouarsii / Rumphii / Seemannii.  If I had to make a guess I'd think Cycas Rumphii, based on the roughly 90 degree leaf insertion angle, dark glossy green on the top with a flat midrib, and pale green on the underside with a raised midrib.  Those are hard for me to tell apart, and there are others that look kind of similar (like Cycas Pectinata) and are also tough to differentiate unless you are very good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Manalto

Very nice.

If you listen closely, you can hear one of those pups saying, "Meg, take me home!"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracy

Female plant as well.  Whenever you see a cycad with megasporophylls instead of a female cone, you can immediately identify the genus as Cycas.  The remnants of some older megasporophylls are readily visible in this photo you posted.  I would expect something in the rumphii family as well.

IMG_1745.thumb.JPG.c927664e4ed172b3e9e8568ff054c977.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Last evening my son and daughter-in-law took me out for an early Mother's Day dinner at Bonefish Grill in Cape Coral. While we waited outside for our table to be ready I noticed a solitary Chamaerops planted near the entrance. It was 6-7' tall and perfectly grown with bluish leaves and prominent gold spines. Chamaerops grow well here but are not often planted because most people prefer more tropical looking palms. But I would plant one like this in a heartbeat.
      Chamaerops humilis solitaire, Bonefish Grill, Cape Coral, FL

    • Mr.Piriyakul
      By Mr.Piriyakul
      Hello All,
      I really appreciate all the help I've been given on this forum. I'd also would like to know if my Dioon Spinulosa is ready to flush? The fur make me think it is. Plus should I repot my guy or wait until the flush? I'm thinking a nice 10g because its in its 7g nursery pot I bought it in. Thank You!
    • Mr.Piriyakul
      By Mr.Piriyakul
      Hey everyone,
      I need some advice about my En. Lehmannii. Have it in a good mix of soil and a tall 5 gallon plastic black pot with 60% or more of perlite and 30% cactus and palm potting mix and garden mix from Lowes. I just want to know if my New plant will Thrive! It is in a spot where the morning sun continues until 3pm with some afternoon sun here and there. My back yard has dogs but they do not eat plants. So my dog and plant are safe. Could any one tell me if I'm doing right by the plant and if it will turn green. I will bring in the plant in heavy storms if possible. I just want my plant to grow and be happy for years. Plus I have a dioon spinulosum  pup with roots in a similar type of soil just more organic 50/50.  Let me know if they look good or not. Please thank you. Its my first time on a forum.
    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      I want to clear out 20 Chamaedorea hooperiana seedlings I germinated from my parent palms' first crop of seeds from last year. It is a clustering palm with stems that can reach 12' tall. Cham hooper is native to the state of Veracruz in Mexico where it grows in tropical rain forest at 3,000-5,000'. It is better known in CA and although you might expect it to prefer a mediterranean climate, it thrives for me in the heat and humidity of FL. I grew the parent palms (2 female, 1 male) from seeds and planted them in shade on the east side of the house. There they have grown to maturity and not given me a lick of trouble. Last year they put out a small first crop of seeds that I've germinated myself to test viability. This year they are seeding much more prolifically.
      Seedlings for sale consist of 3 that are approx. 1 year old; the rest are 6 months. See summary:
      Chamaedorea hooperiana: 20 seedlings @ $20.00 for the lot.
      Shipping = $10.00 via Priority Mail. Sent without pots & soil, with roots wrapped in damp orchid moss, clear wrap and foil
      Total = $30.00
      Payment via Paypal
      No shipping outside the US. No shipping to HI. PM me if you are interested
      Photos

      Parent Palms

       
       
    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      I was doing more spring yard maintenance when I realized my twin (from one seed) Dwarf Red Spicata coconut twins are now 3 years old. They are from the first crop of seeds in 2016 of my late, bodacious mother palm that I first bought in 2010 and the only set of twins she had. I say "late" because she was the victim of Hurricane Irma in Sept. 2017. Both palms are growing well and still almost of equal size while quickly outgrowing cosmetic leaf damage from last winter. They really hate any temps below 50F and leaves will spot, yellow and brown tip to show their displeasure. Anyway, here they are on a warm, sunny afternoon.
      Cocos nucifera Dwarf Red Spicata twins, Cape Coral, FL: 3 years old

×
×
  • Create New...