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Manalto

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Manalto

Four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) is supposed to be an old fashioned Southern plant but not only have I never seen it growing in Alabama, I haven't had much success trying to grow it myself when sown directly in the ground. Once again, I'm giving it a shot. I've started some 'Salmon Sunset' in flats to transplant.  I've also purchased seeds for a white form, which I will grow in a different area.  I like its fragrance at night.

 What has your experience with this plant been?   Have you found it to be invasive?

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Silas_Sancona
51 minutes ago, Manalto said:

Four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) is supposed to be an old fashioned Southern plant but not only have I never seen it growing in Alabama, I haven't had much success trying to grow it myself when sown directly in the ground. Once again, I'm giving it a shot. I've started some 'Salmon Sunset' in flats to transplant.  I've also purchased seeds for a white form, which I will grow in a different area.  I like its fragrance at night.

 What has your experience with this plant been?   Have you found it to be invasive?

Easy... Very easy, and flower quickly after germinating also..  Only issue i had is they aren't fond of low desert heat -in pots- ( mine rotted by mid- June )  If i had a shadier spot that stayed moister, they'd likely do fine in the ground.  In California, they can get a bit aggressive but are easily removed ( have to take out the tubers. simply topping does nothing ) Have heard of people using them as a green, " chop 'n drop " crop in the garden.

A testament to how tough these things are,  would find them growing/ flowering from cracks in the alley / parking lot behind a bar i used to work at when i lived in N.E. Kansas.. 

The Salmon Orange cultivar looks exactly as it is advertised and is quite fragrant. 
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2 other sp. you might look into: S. / S.E. AZ native Mirabilis longiflora. Just as easy as M. jalapa but white flowers are a touch longer/ wider with a long pinkish purple stigma/ throat .. Fragrance a touch more Jasmine -like, but plenty citrus-y. 
Not sure how it will handle more humidity but Colorado  4 - o' - Clock ( Mirabilis multiflora ) is super tough and can thrive on no extra water once established. Grows as far north as Montana so cold isn't a concern. Flowers are typically Magenta / Violet, and a bit wider in size. Not sure if they're fragrant though. Mine are starting year # 2 from seed.. Have heard they take 2-3 years to flower from seed. Unlike both M. jalapa and longiflora,  these survived life in a pot thru our summer heat.

The blotchy- flowered forms of M. jalapa, and a couple other native sp. are next on my list to try later.

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Manalto

Good to know. I was frustrated by my lack of success in Alabama because I had grown the broken-color form without a problem in central Connecticut and they came back for years, presumably from dropped seed.

Thank you for the tip on Mirabilis multiflora.  I've ordered some seed. Fragrance in the evening garden is better mood therapy than any psychiatrist could achieve. Reports show it growing  successfully in central Florida and central Georgia so the heat and humidity of the north Gulf Coast should not be a problem.

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PricklyPearSATC

There are purple ones that are naturalized here. 
It's so hot there that they open too late.  They need a decent amount of water. 

High Country Gardens offers one of the native varieties:

https://www.highcountrygardens.com/perennial-plants/unique-plants/mirablis-multiflora

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Silas_Sancona
19 minutes ago, PricklyPearSATC said:

There are purple ones that are naturalized here. 
It's so hot there that they open too late.  They need a decent amount of water. 

High Country Gardens offers one of the native varieties:

https://www.highcountrygardens.com/perennial-plants/unique-plants/mirablis-multiflora

Central / west TX also has these as well.. Only species in the Genus, and apparently quite common around San Antonio ( Inat observation data ).  Wish i could find anyone offering seeds.
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/165749-Nyctaginia-capitata

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PricklyPearSATC
1 minute ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Central / west TX also has these as well.. Only species in the Genus, and apparently quite common around San Antonio ( Inat observation data ).  Wish i could find anyone offering seeds.
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/165749-Nyctaginia-capitata

Scarlet musk flower! 
I see them out in the wild.  They are not very common.
I think they're hard to germinate from seed. 

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PricklyPearSATC
4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Central / west TX also has these as well.. Only species in the Genus, and apparently quite common around San Antonio ( Inat observation data ).  Wish i could find anyone offering seeds.
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/165749-Nyctaginia-capitata

I think my husband saw one when he was riding his bike and he told me about it..LOL...
He rides 8 miles on the trails and it just popped out at him.  I found it a few days later when I went to the same spot.

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PricklyPearSATC
12 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Central / west TX also has these as well.. Only species in the Genus, and apparently quite common around San Antonio ( Inat observation data ).  Wish i could find anyone offering seeds.
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/165749-Nyctaginia-capitata

I just saw their San Antonio pins on the map.  Almost all are in parks. 

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Silas_Sancona
4 minutes ago, PricklyPearSATC said:

I think my husband saw one when he was riding his bike and he told me about it..LOL...
He rides 8 miles on the trails and it just popped out at him.  I found it a few days later when I went to the same spot.

From what i've read, seems these can be started from cuttings ( mentioned over on Dave's garden, ..kind of skeptical about that myself. ) and, from the kind of places it prefers, sounds like the seed has to be scratched before it will germinate ( Like Bluebonnets, Devil's Claw, Morning Glories )

Interesting plant, especially if quite drought tolerant. 

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