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Darren Michael

Documenting ranges/gradients?

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Darren Michael

Hi everyone, I'm an artist/cartographer/landscape architect and palm enthusiast with also a general interest in plant geography (natural and horticultural).  I've seen a lot of posts here dealing with the actual and potential ranges of various palms, including using google street views to document the northernmost/southernmost example of a given species. This goes beyond palms, but I'm curious - has anyone ever come across, or contemplated, a combination of street views at even intervals along a temperature gradient, say from New York to Key West, documenting the appearances of various species at certain points? It would create a sort of photo-transect along the gradient, and could incorporate natural ranges as well as horticultural. 

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Silas_Sancona
11 minutes ago, Darren Michael said:

Hi everyone, I'm an artist/cartographer/landscape architect and palm enthusiast with also a general interest in plant geography (natural and horticultural).  I've seen a lot of posts here dealing with the actual and potential ranges of various palms, including using google street views to document the northernmost/southernmost example of a given species. This goes beyond palms, but I'm curious - has anyone ever come across, or contemplated, a combination of street views at even intervals along a temperature gradient, say from New York to Key West, documenting the appearances of various species at certain points? It would create a sort of photo-transect along the gradient, and could incorporate natural ranges as well as horticultural. 

Darren Michael, Welcome to the Forum.

Regarding the question, think Inaturalist would come close, though the overall " idea " could be refined better. 

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Darren Michael

Thanks! I'll take a look at Inaturalist - and yes, it's the general concept of documenting/illustrating these large-scale gradients that I'm interested in. The details and methodology would need a lot more thought. 

Edited by Darren Michael
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