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Sofia

What is happening to my Fatsia japonica?

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Sofia

Hello everyone. I bought my Fatsia japonica almost 2 months ago and since then, the plant has been thriving with no problems at all. Recently, I noticed some spots on the leaves that lost their vibrant colour. Does anyone know where this lack of chlorophyll comes from? I water it only when the top soil starts to feel dry and keep it in room temperature (25 C). Since it’s a tropical plant, I also like to keep its leaves moisturised so I use a water spray to keep the leaves hydrated. I fertilise it as needed. The only “problem” that maybe comes to my mind is that the plant has never been repotted and maybe it’s time (considering that the roots may be way too tight and may need some more space). Open the link below to see the image: https://drive.google.com/file/d/13tO3y2mTCPpnSN_LQen_1mN4ovfilitY/view?usp=sharing

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PricklyPearSATC

They are hard to keep as house plants. They need plenty of water, humidity and cool temperatures.  Our summers down here kill them.  They are not tropical.  They are related to English Ivy.  Outdoors, they need to be grown in the shade. 

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Silas_Sancona
On 3/27/2021 at 3:38 PM, Sofia said:

Hello everyone. I bought my Fatsia japonica almost 2 months ago and since then, the plant has been thriving with no problems at all. Recently, I noticed some spots on the leaves that lost their vibrant colour. Does anyone know where this lack of chlorophyll comes from? I water it only when the top soil starts to feel dry and keep it in room temperature (25 C). Since it’s a tropical plant, I also like to keep its leaves moisturised so I use a water spray to keep the leaves hydrated. I fertilise it as needed. The only “problem” that maybe comes to my mind is that the plant has never been repotted and maybe it’s time (considering that the roots may be way too tight and may need some more space). Open the link below to see the image: https://drive.google.com/file/d/13tO3y2mTCPpnSN_LQen_1mN4ovfilitY/view?usp=sharing

Sofia, Welcome to the forum..

Like PricklyPearSATC mentions, these can be a bit tricky indoors but i have seen people grow them inside.. Though they will do better/ be fuller outside.  ( out on a shaded patio, deck, etc )


1st thing id advise, Would be sure the pot it is in drains excess water ( Don't want any water sitting in the bottom of the pot < Can starve the roots of Oxygen / leading to root rot issues > ) 

As far as fertilizer, would only fertilize a couple times a year and, depending on where you are located/ what is available to purchase, would recommend something slow release and organic ( preferably ) over liquid -anything.. Liquid fertilizers are essentially composed of salts that can cause burning, esp. on indoor plants.  A fertilizer formula similar to this is good : 5-4-5. Middle number should always be lower than the 1st or last.

Keep in bright light, but no direct sun ( sun coming through a window )  Light coming through a window on the north or east side of a room would be ideal.

Like mentioned, as tropical as they look, they are quite tough.. A very common landscape plant in California that takes quite a bit of abuse/ less water than you'd assume in the ground.

Inside, keep moist, but not soaked.  If you decide to repot, plant in a pot that will be big enough to allow 2 years worth of growth, and use a soil mix that drains well.

Hope this helps..

 

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Collectorpalms
3 hours ago, PricklyPearSATC said:

They are hard to keep as house plants. They need plenty of water, humidity and cool temperatures.  Our summers down here kill them.  They are not tropical.  They are related to English Ivy.  Outdoors, they need to be grown in the shade. 

will they absolutely not live here in Texas zone 8b because of summer? They are always sold as Lowe's as an outdoor shade plant.

Edited by Collectorpalms

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Xenon
40 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

will they absolutely not live here in Texas zone 8b because of summer? They are always sold as Lowe's as an outdoor shade plant.

grows fine in Houston

Edited by Xenon

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Manalto

They're sold here in Mobile (8B) for the landscape as well and I see them all over the place, apparently left to their own devices and doing just fine.  I have failed twice to grow Fatsia japonica. My best guess is that I was not around to water them as they were getting established.

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Fusca
7 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Like mentioned, as tropical as they look, they are quite tough

I can attest to that.  I have one growing on the east side of the house and it was frozen completely to the ground last month, but it's starting to come back from the roots.  It did lose one stem over the summer but otherwise looked good.

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PricklyPearSATC
21 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

will they absolutely not live here in Texas zone 8b because of summer? They are always sold as Lowe's as an outdoor shade plant.

San Antonio:  Different than East Texas.  We are dryer.  And are often on water restrictions.  We were even on water restrictions during the snow storm!  We are currently still at stage 1 water restrictions.  Fatsia Japonica struggles in my limestone. 

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