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Washingtonia Filifera cold hardiness with age

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GardnerDylan6a

Does anyone know the cold hardiness of w. filifera in proportion to it´s age or trunk dimensions, also does anyone know if the location of the tree dramatically affects the cold hardiness of it´s seeds

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Jimhardy

Truth or Consequences Filifera reportedly survived 0(F) on more than one occasion.

 

New Mexico 

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ryjohn

I have five giant filiferas seed grown from the “Truth or Consequences” trees here in NorthEast Louisiana.  They get burned a bit every so often, but are completely hardy here.  They’ve seen down to 7F here in my wet winter zone 8.  Clearly they are leaf hardier than other pure-filifera-looking Washingtonia in my area.  They do need some mild winters at small size to gain hardiness, and I do not recommend them for northerly zone 8’s.  They do not tolerate long winters in my experience...

Edited by ryjohn
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jwitt

Multiple filifera trees have survived below zero multiple times in this area. These are in Corrales NM.  Still alive today. Back to back night of -11f and below zero in consecutive winters.

20160830_112626.jpg

20160830_112720.jpg

Capture _2016-09-04-23-09-03.png

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UK_Palms

My 3-4 foot Filifera takes quite a bit of winter damage to the fronds, from the wet-cold. Right now it doesn't look great. However the big 30 foot Filifera's over here don't seem to take any damage at all during winter. The big one at Canvey was undamaged from 15F in February 2018. And that's a wet-cold. So I can only surmise that mature Filifera are more hardy due to them being much bigger. They definitely seem to be able to handle wet-cold much better when they are bigger and properly established. Again, I am basing that off 30 foot tall specimens here in the UK at 51N latitude, which are unfazed by 15F and wet-cold conditions. Filifera do seem a lot more hardy at a bigger size, compared to smaller ones.

Hardiness seems to vary for each individual specimen, and that goes for pretty much all palms. A low of 10F may kill one Filifera, whereas another one right next to it may be virtually undamaged from the same temperatures. Some are just more hardy than others. The only way you are going to create a hardier seed stock is by planting lots of Filifera's in a marginal zone, allowing many to die, which will separate the weak from the strong. The survivors will likely pass on their extra hardy genetics. If you plant say 20 Filifera's where you are, and only 4 of them survive to maturity, it is likely they will be pretty tough, hardy specimens. Allowing those survivors to interbreed should in theory create hardier seed stock. I'm not 100% on that though.

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Jimhardy
2 hours ago, jwitt said:

Multiple filifera trees have survived below zero multiple times in this area. These are in Corrales NM.  Still alive today. Back to back night of -11f and below zero in consecutive winters.

20160830_112626.jpg

20160830_112720.jpg

 

 

 

AMAZING AMAZING AMAZING 

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Advective

My Filifera went through a week below freezing with consecutive lows of 5ºF and 2ºF last month. It defoliated but has pushed over a foot of new growth since then, not missing a beat, really.

It's 7 years old and the trunk is about 2' wide, on the slow growing side for a Washingtonia

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NBTX11

Both my smaller and larger Filifera took the cold easily and are quickly growing and recovering from 9F.  Age of palm did not seem to make any difference.  The new fronds look great.

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TexasColdHardyPalms

Weve had filifera survive 8 in the dallas area with no issue.  The palms out in west texas /SE NM survived -3f for an extended time in 2011 and I dont know of any that died. Every other palm species in southern NM died that year. 

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Palmfarmer
3 hours ago, Advective said:

My Filifera went through a week below freezing with consecutive lows of 5ºF and 2ºF last month. It defoliated but has pushed over a foot of new growth since then, not missing a beat, really.

It's 7 years old and the trunk is about 2' wide, on the slow growing side for a Washingtonia

impressive! Over a fot of new growth, you are talking about frond growth i assume

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jwitt
3 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

 Every other palm species in southern NM died that year. 

Got details? 

I got pics to disprove your statement.  

Or did you mean SE NM and not southern NM?

Locally, southern NM means Las Cruces, T or C, Deming, Alamogordo. Kinda like calling Houston south Texas.

20170815_152810-1.jpg

20170815_152929.jpg

Edited by jwitt
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jwitt
6 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Weve had filifera survive 8 in the dallas area with no issue.  The palms out in west texas /SE NM survived -3f for an extended time in 2011 and I dont know of any that died. Every other palm species in southern NM died that year. 

A little bit more pertaining to SE NM.  This is a survivor from Roswell NM 2/2011.  The official temperature was -7f on 2/3/2011 and -11f the next night.  Skinny filifera? Also a sabal mexicana several blocks to the east survived. Roswell!!!

On a side note, the high/low on 2/2/2011 was 10f/1f.   3 consecutive nights at or below zero!

 

Screenshot_2021-03-17-03-24-54.png

Edited by jwitt
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Advective
5 hours ago, Palmfarmer said:

impressive! Over a fot of new growth, you are talking about frond growth i assume

Yes, new frond growth

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I meant SE NM aka Carlsbad area. 

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John Derek
11 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Weve had filifera survive 8 in the dallas area with no issue.  The palms out in west texas /SE NM survived -3f for an extended time in 2011 and I dont know of any that died. Every other palm species in southern NM died that year. 

I went to Houston last weekend every Washingtonia I saw looked dead. Their Sabal Palmetto looked normal. I covered the wash fila I got from you and while the leaves burned the spears are green.

Edited by John Derek

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jwitt
2 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

I meant SE NM aka Carlsbad area. 

Kind of what I thought.  SE NM has never had much palm variety compared to southern NM.  Too much plains influence. I do remember smaller(5 foot)filifera struggling and dying over the years in Carlsbad at the desert living museum in the late 70's.  There were others scattered around town, but few and far between. None taller than 15-20' at that time and never much bigger than that up until about 2010. 

I am much more familiar with Roswell, sister lived there for quite a while. Carlsbad was a 3-4 year visit interval. Temperature wise, Carlsbad is probably  NM's most mild area, just not palmwise.  Too much swing!

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NBTX11

Filifera a month after 9 degrees. Zero damage to growing fronds 

7965CE82-F128-4F8A-8FFA-5F2D22BE892B.jpeg

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Jimhardy

That is just amazing...what a superstar of a palm.

I remember well  the hardiness of my Robusta/Filifera hybrid...anything below

23F leaves are burned...I just got a bunch of seedlings out of the Las Vegas area that

look to be Filifera (as much as you can tell at that age) it will be interesting to one day

compare the hardiness.

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howfam
On 3/16/2021 at 4:46 PM, ryjohn said:

I have five giant filiferas seed grown from the “Truth or Consequences” trees here in NorthEast Louisiana.  They get burned a bit every so often, but are completely hardy here.  They’ve seen down to 7F here in my wet winter zone 8.  Clearly they are leaf hardier than other pure-filifera-looking Washingtonia in my area.  They do need some mild winters at small size to gain hardiness, and I do not recommend them for northerly zone 8’s.  They do not tolerate long winters in my experience...

Would you please post pictures of the "Truth or Consequences " Filiferas ?

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SailorBold

Here are my TorC palms after 2 nights in the 9-10f range...I dunno.im guessing with.90% defoliation?? With green petioles?.. after those 2 nights.. my winter minimums are generally.. normally around 13-16f.

I confirm as do these photos.. that these palms are leaf hardy to 14-15f with minor to minimal bronzing.. all other filiferas in the area burn around 20ish.. which leads me to believe they are the Filibusta hybrid.. the ideal hybrid.. which I also call Robustifera burns at around the same 20f mark.. but recovery much faster during summer.  Robusta is marginal here pasted on a south wall. So if you can get a true filifera.. you will find they are way more leaf hardy than any of the hybrids as well as full on robusta. 

20210321_115848.jpg

20210321_115840.jpg

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SailorBold
6 hours ago, Jimhardy said:

I don't know that these are the original T & C  Washys but maybe in the area...

the pics I recall seemed to be 2 solitary palms out in the middle of nowhere.

 

https://www.plantdelights.com/products/washingtonia-filifera-truth-or-consequences

 

 

They are.. and here are some pics when I collected seeds..

20190328_150828.jpg

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Jimhardy

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Axel Amsterdam

Probably an offspring from the large ones in Truth or Consequences, this one has been growing in TorC for more than a decade. Over the years on streetview the crown has always been full and green.

https://goo.gl/maps/qJWwUXfPJNeFmZck9

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SailorBold

Nudder Abq washingtonia..  looks like its been there for some time.. looks hybridish...

 

palm.jpg

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climate change virginia

what age do they flower?

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Reyes Vargas
14 minutes ago, climate change virginia said:

what age do they flower?

I'm not 100% sure but I think they have to be at least 15-20 feet tall for them to flower.

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RyManUtah
2 hours ago, Reyes Vargas said:

I'm not 100% sure but I think they have to be at least 15-20 feet tall for them to flower.

Shortest flowering specimens I’ve seen, the seeds are barely hanging where one could  reach a handful - so that sounds about right.  They have rather long flower stalks. 

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Dpalms
On 5/21/2021 at 10:52 PM, SailorBold said:

Nudder Abq washingtonia..  looks like its been there for some time.. looks hybridish...

 

palm.jpg

Nice washy in Abq. What are rough cross streets?

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SailorBold
On 5/26/2021 at 9:56 PM, Dpalms said:

Nice washy in Abq. What are rough cross streets?

Its in Westgate Heights

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