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Mr.Piriyakul

Encephalartos lehmannii and Dioon Spinulosa in South Florida

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Mr.Piriyakul

Hello People,

I posted this already on palms in pots but some people directed me here for more help. I just want to know if My En Lehmannii will say blue in South Florida. If the rain is to much can I just being them in and out side as needed to keep the blue? These are my questions. Plus I have this Dioon Spinulosa pup with roots. The leaves on it are from a old flush before I bought it (so I am told), Will new flush come in July/ Juneish? I know I wait but I am curious and new to cycads.  Thanks everyoneIMG_5145.thumb.jpg.7c544d1a1923a793a1cd37b28f09f9dd.jpgIMG_0757.thumb.jpg.2ab9e5fa55fb55ffed5aeb8a1f0a8fc5.jpg

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Tracy
10 hours ago, Mr.Piriyakul said:

I have this Dioon Spinulosa pup with roots. The leaves on it are from a old flush before I bought it (so I am told), Will new flush come in July/ Juneish?

In my experience, the Dioon genus tends to be a little less predictable on when they will flush than some of the other cycad species.  All the cycads share the common thread that they need to build up enough energy for that massive push of new leaves.  My expectation is that you will find the Encephalartos lehmannii will be more predictable in its flushes than the Dioon spinulosum.  Here in Southern California, most Encephalartos will flush in Spring to early summer and earlier if you are further inland where it starts getting hot before it does on the coast.  Warmer winters and early spring result in earlier flushes generally.  If your growing season (heat) is long enough, you may get multiple flushes in one year.  Some Cycas I'm growing flush on about an 8-9 month schedule so the time of year is always shifting.  

 

10 hours ago, Mr.Piriyakul said:

I just want to know if My En Lehmannii will say blue in South Florida. If the rain is to much can I just being them in and out side as needed to keep the blue?

I don't know that I would want to be dragging the pot in and out of the rain every time it rains, but avoid overhead watering to minimize any additional washing of the waxy leaf protection off that gives the blue color.  Mark the pot it is in, with the south orientation and always keep your plant oriented to the sun this way if you are moving it frequently.  Give it the sunniest spot you can and you will maximize the probability of retaining the color.  Even here in dry Southern California, older flushes will lose their blue color on plants that retain a mix of older and new flushes.   My lehmannii is currently holding 3 flushes, one from last year and the oldest from 3 springs back.  E lehmannii is one of the faster growing species of Encephalartos, so it should do well for you.

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Merlyn

I agree with Tracy on the Dioons.  I have 5 or 6 Spinulosum with 4 large ones planted in the yard.  One is in a fairly sunny spot and raised up high relative to the surrounding area.  It wasn't the best planting spot for a Spinulosum, which tend to like water and at least partial shade in FL.  It has been working on a new flush for 1.5 years.  The center has gotten pretty huge, it just hasn't quite committed to it yet!  Another short-trunk one flushed about 1 month after I planted it in May 2020.  My biggest with 3' of trunk coned last spring, shortly before I bought it from the nursery.  It's not shown any signs yet.  The smaller 3 (two are similar in size to yours) flush at random.  One is setting up to flush now, but that's because 28F and 30F with frost torched the two leaves in Dec/Jan. 

Regarding blues in FL, if they are exposed to our daily torrential downpours they'll lose most of their color.  I have Lehmannii, Trispinosus, Horridus, Arenarius and several hybrids with the blues.  They are all in pots or in the ground with full sun, but exposed to rain.  In the below photo there's a Trispinosus (top purple/red pot), Horridus (2 plants down from the Tri), and Lehmannii (2 plants to the right of Tri).  The Horridus is "kinda blue" but the others are mostly green.  I was at Tom Broome's Cycad Jungle in Lakeland, and he said he could only keep them really blue if he had them in a greenhouse with hand watering.  When they went out into the rain they lost 1/2 their coloring with the first storm.

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Mr.Piriyakul

Thank you guys, I think I'm gonna try to keep it as blue as is for as long as possible. I am thinking about getting a grow light for when it is inside for South Florida's stormy days in summer. I just want a few large flushes that are blue then I will be at peace. The dioon is something I just want to get big. I going to buy a larger dioon from a garden center in Florida for instant gratification. $60 for a dioon spinulosum with a 2 foot tall cortex is pretty good price. Thank you Tracy for the direct comments! And Merliyn for your images it really helps!

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Coasta

Lehmannii was my first cycad back in October besides cycas revoluta. Looks like you have a very nice plant! If I'm not mistaken, that looks like ice blue cycads tag. They sell some great cycads. Happy growing!!!

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Mr.Piriyakul
19 hours ago, Coasta said:

Lehmannii was my first cycad back in October besides cycas revoluta. Looks like you have a very nice plant! If I'm not mistaken, that looks like ice blue cycads tag. They sell some great cycads. Happy growing!!!

Ice Blue Cycads hooked it up, Thank you. I will keep him blue for as long as possible. Cycas Revoluta was my first cycad and I did not even know it. I only just got into cycads late 2020. 

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Coasta

Very cool!! Same here. I got into cycads in October with my first lehmannii I purchased in California. Happy growing!

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