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    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      So I acquired this Encephalartos hybrid as a 1 or 2 leaf seedling in a band size container (3" x 9") several years ago.  It has proven to be a good grower.  I acquired it as a hybrid of an E blue arenarius x latifrons.  I have always wondered about how blue it is because I don't recall many 1st generation hybrids of green species with blue actually being such an intense blue.  Now as a caudex is beginning to appear, I noticed the orange colored ring collars (see photos below).  When I see that color on a collar of a blue cycad, I immediately think of E lehmannii.  The leaflets are much narrower than what I would expect if there were any latifrons  in the mix.  So perhaps some sort of lehmanii x horridus or lehmanii x trispinosis?  I might consider lehmanii and the other purported parent latifrons.
      So am I reading too much into that collar color?  Since I have been thinking about this for a while I wanted to see if anyone else got one of these and has had similar thoughts.  I'm happy with the plant whatever it turns out to be, just based on structure and color, but I am curious about it's parentage.  At some point I'll have additional clues when it gets to coning size but that's quite a few flushes and years away.


    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      Ok... there is no Encephalartos plumosa, but if they had named this cycad based on appearance as opposed to naming it after someone, I think its pretty obvious that it should have been named "plumosa".  Anyone else growing Encephalartos turneri that can either reinforce or refute my opinion?  My male has remained solitary thus far without producing any basal suckers.
      No offense to Ian Turner this cycads namesake, I'm sure it was a well deserved naming.


    • DCA_Palm_Fan
      By DCA_Palm_Fan
      Hey all.  Haven't made a post of my own in a while, so I thought I'd share some of my potted palms that I keep on my patio here in zone 10A in southern FL.   PLEASE disregard the somewhat messy patio at the moment.  Thank you!  its a work in progress! 
        In April of 2021 we had to move from our place which was on Maximo Point, the southern most tip of mainland Pinellas county.  There, we were about a mile out into Tampa Bay on a small, less than 1/4 mile wide strip of land that ran along I-275 leading up to the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.   We moved about 2 miles away to an  Island in Tampa bay that is probably a bit smaller than Key West, called Coquina Key.   In front of the new place is a fairly big salt / brackish lake, and behind me is a large body of water called Big Bayou.   Once again we are still surrounded by water in very close proximity.   The Patio faces South / Southeast and gets full sun in summer until about 3-4Pm.   Winter we will get it at a lower angle, and for most of the day, keeping us warm. The building will protect us from the chilly NW winds from "cold fronts" that occasionally come through during "winter" lol.    Its really more like "wet season (summer) and Dry Season (winter) here as the winter temps, while cool at times, are still nothing really close to actual "winter temps"  
      In these photos there is nothing rare or particularly spectacular, but they are all palms that I love.   Dypsis Lutescens, Adonidia Merrillii, Phoenix Roebelenii, Chamaedora Cataractum.
      First two pics are of my whole patio on the 4th of July 2021.  Second of the first two is my newly (at the time) repotted Pigmy Date Palm.  (Phoenix Roebelenii)  It now has several feet of trunk.  It was purchased in early 2018 and had one very small one, and the main trunk which at that time had about 4-6" of "trunk".  It was much shorter.  I removed the very small one to allow the bigger one to have the pot all to itself and so far its flourished. 
       


       
      The rest of these photos below were taken today, 8/11/2021.
       Below:   some large Dypsis Lutescens in "half" whiskey barrels.  They were pretty large when I got them in late 2017/ early 2018, but had no clear trunk.
      Now there are lots of clear trunks on them 

       
      Below: Adonidia Merrillii. Purchased in mid 2018 for $25.00, it was fairly small and trunkless.  It has done fantastic in this pot since, and will be getting an upgrade this year.

       
      Below:  Phoenix Roebelenii.

       
      The following 3 photos below are my water HOGS, Chamaedorea Cataractum.  They were fairly small when I got them 2 years ago for $10 each.  They have grown great, 
      and are now loaded with seeds. These things are WATER HOGS.  I have to water then daily if it doesn't rain, sometimes twice daily each, and they need to be 
      DRENCHED / FLOODED each time.   They are much happier on this patio as its less windy. It is still pretty darn windy here, but no nearly as strong / ongoing for hours on end 
      as it was at the old place. 



    • ximena_alvarez
      By ximena_alvarez
      Hi all!
       
      I’m in search of any footage of anything cycad related for a documentary over cycads. Would love to have anything you might have, especially of any plants in situ, their beauty, anatomy, etc.
      All locations and identifying attributes will be censored for the plants’ protection. Give me a quick DM if you’re able to help out. Let me know if you have any questions and I’d be happy to answer.
       
      Thanks in advance!
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