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piping plovers

The Anthurium craze and repotting Anthurium magnificum

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piping plovers

I finally got onto the anthurium craze.  After 3 years of contemplation I bought an A. veitchii last year and actually killed it in a week; I left it in my car in the summer while traveling/running errands not realizing the sun came out and cooked it.


Anyhow, I purchased 4 Christmas gifts for myself this year A. veitchii, A. magnificum, A. woroqueanum, and A. Vitariifolium.  They were all small rooted cuttings and pricey for their size.  I noticed that the growing medium was not as porous as I have been reading that it should be.  Arriving in December / January in the frigid northeast USA was not ideal and even though I paid for one day shipping with heat packs the plants looked rough during first several months.  The magnificum’s leaves were  damaged and not attractive but I think it will pull through.

I purchased mesh net pots and created a mix of leca clay pellets, orchid bark mix, peat & perlite potting mix and sphagnum.  I lined the bottom and sides of pot with long fiber sphagnum, placed the plant into the pots and filled around the root ball with my mix.  I noticed there was a lot of growing tips off the root system so I think it will be ready for the spring season.  Below are some before and after photos of the magnifucum.  I’ll be repotting the others in the coming weeks.

46B84D3A-B6E2-4419-90FD-8E048CFC7EA5.thumb.jpeg.f5380d2fc865511b990c489b5107a2a3.jpegE9E09B9A-AA63-4DA2-9D0A-97B703C86CB5.thumb.jpeg.f67b9fc72964ab56d7a20d005c69bfed.jpeg342933C1-11B0-45C6-A481-3970C99E3AAB.thumb.jpeg.5f6dc11cf02c6c271b5d7d605db6d5c6.jpegF913D8C6-175D-43D5-B1CD-A01448767A66.thumb.jpeg.51eb4cbfa8c8c82b276d7555595fcac7.jpeg

 

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metalfan

Your Magnificum barely has roots. Your best bet would be to place it in straight sphagnum moss and keep it damp and humid until it recovers and grows some roots.

Anthurium veitchii is very epiphytic, as is Anthurium vittariifolium. Both will do well in moss or a chunky mix. I have 3 veitchii's mounted, and 4-5 in open mesh baskets. Mine are all very old, and are all propagations of one plant, as are my vittariifoliums. Vittariifolium can be grown mounted or in a basket.

Anthurium warocqueanum should be affixed to a moss totem and as it grows, the roots should be overlaid with moss and secured to the totem. It does not like to dry out. I grow mine in straight sphagnum moss in a mesh basket.

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piping plovers
48 minutes ago, metalfan said:

Your Magnificum barely has roots. Your best bet would be to place it in straight sphagnum moss and keep it damp and humid until it recovers and grows some roots.

Anthurium veitchii is very epiphytic, as is Anthurium vittariifolium. Both will do well in moss or a chunky mix. I have 3 veitchii's mounted, and 4-5 in open mesh baskets. Mine are all very old, and are all propagations of one plant, as are my vittariifoliums. Vittariifolium can be grown mounted or in a basket.

Anthurium warocqueanum should be affixed to a moss totem and as it grows, the roots should be overlaid with moss and secured to the totem. It does not like to dry out. I grow mine in straight sphagnum moss in a mesh basket.

 

Thank you for the cultural advice on all of these species.  Yes, I didn't realize how barely rooted some of these were when I purchased; but was obvious when I began repotting.  I'll plan to get a totem pole for my warocqueanum as it grows.  

Extraordinary specimens you have in your collection.  Thanks for sharing!

 

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metalfan

Where did you buy them from? The Magnificum, which is the only one you are showing, looks like a really recent import, a barely rooting what is called nowadays (I think its a silly term...) 'chonk'...which is a mid-stem cutting from a larger plant

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metalfan

Veitchii wants to live on a tree.

IMG_8531.jpg

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piping plovers
10 hours ago, metalfan said:

Where did you buy them from? The Magnificum, which is the only one you are showing, looks like a really recent import, a barely rooting what is called nowadays (I think its a silly term...) 'chonk'...which is a mid-stem cutting from a larger plant

I purchased the magnifficum from an importer on Ebay,  Very astute observation on being a recent import.  Now that I noted that it was barely rooted I don't feel so badly about having done something wrong to harm the foliage; they were in vulnerable condition form the start it seems.  Yeh, I have been catching on to that lingo, "Chonk. " I will be sure to buy better rooted plants in the future, and in the warm months.

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piping plovers
4 hours ago, metalfan said:

Veitchii wants to live on a tree.

I like seeing these Veitchiis in the basket.  Very impressive plants with the roots hanging down.  How do you plan to repot that?  Will you just place the whole fiber/metal basket into a larger one to avoid disturbing the roots or is that plant fine in the basket for many years to come?  I sometimes feel that way about my Vanda orchid and don't really see the point to up potting to a larger wooden basket when all the roots hang out & down anyhow.

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metalfan

You have to be careful buying from 'importers'. There are a lot of folks who have jumped on this aroid explosion bandwagon in an attempt to cash in on the current craze. Someone local offered me an unrooted A. peltigerum, basically a 'chunk' with one leaf, and even though I'd love to have a peltigerum, I didn;t go for it. And that would have been a TRADE. Not a buy. Peltigerum is finicky enough without having to rehab and root it myself.

I'll leave the veitchii in the basket until the coir deteriorates then just carefully strap another coir lined basket of moss and bark onto the bottom. Unless I can find a tree to put it in. I have trees in my greenhouse, in fact I have a smaller veitchii mounted to a bauhinia tree. But most of them are slender trunked and wouldn;t bear the weight of a large plant like this one. I do have a huge A. 'Big Splash' in an old Plumeria tree, I will show you a photo later. This is my Anthurium metallicum....it has adventitious roots almost 4 ft long

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piping plovers

Impressive metallicum!  Great job.  I just looked up the peltigerum - fascinating.  It looks other-worldy.  So I am curious why the peltigerum would be challenging for you to grow in Florida --and in a greenhouse in Florida!!!  Does it have a need for cooler nights than you can normally provide or some other difficult cultural requirements?

Also, can you recommend any places to buy anthuriums in FL?  I get down to Ft Meyers/Sanibel area a few times a year and enjoy  plant hunting drives out to the Homestead area and even up to Sarasota area.  Thanks!

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Missi

You're not kidding about peltigerum being tricky. I got a seedling from an Ecuadorian grower in late 2019. I made the mistake of not acclimating it in a terrarium or grow tent. It lost all of its original leaves but slowly pushed new leaves, still only holding one or two leaves. Once one of the new leaves because necrotic, I brought it in to my indoor terrarium where it made a come back. When it grew too tall for my indoor terrarium, I placed it in my outdoor humidity tent where it's been steadily pushing new leaves through the winter. Lil nervous about how it's going to do in the tent through the heat of the summer :unsure:

Once magnificum is established, it's one of the easiest Anthurium species to grow. I got mine from Fairchild's Members Day plant sale a few years ago. It grows like a weed and doesn't fuss if the potting media dries out. I find crystallinum and its hybrids to be the same hardiness. 

pel.jpg

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piping plovers
21 minutes ago, Missi said:

Once magnificum is established, it's one of the easiest Anthurium species to grow. I got mine from Fairchild's Members Day plant sale a few years ago. It grows like a weed and doesn't fuss if the potting media dries out. I find crystallinum and its hybrids to be the same hardiness. 

Great job Missi on turning that one around—it looks healthy and so exotic.  Hard to imagine that you Florida growers need a humidity tent but everything is relative. 

I’m encouraged to hear the magnificum is more resilient.  I’d like to get a crystillanum or forgetii next.

 

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Missi
44 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

Great job Missi on turning that one around—it looks healthy and so exotic.  Hard to imagine that you Florida growers need a humidity tent but everything is relative. 

I’m encouraged to hear the magnificum is more resilient.  I’d like to get a crystillanum or forgetii next.

 

Forgetii is also VERY resilient! I have all 3 forms (dark, normal, and silver veined). They need to be repotted soon and their potting media dries out quickly, but they haven't skipped a beat!

Yea, people always think of Florida being tropical. It's more like a savannah. Tropical during rainy season (late spring to early fall) then bone dry during the winter and can get quite chilly. Believe it or not, we even have a bad brush fire season (right now through late April/Mayish).

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piping plovers
18 hours ago, Missi said:

Yea, people always think of Florida being tropical. It's more like a savannah. Tropical during rainy season (late spring to early fall) then bone dry during the winter and can get quite chilly. Believe it or not, we even have a bad brush fire season (right now through late April/Mayish).

It Makes sense Missi now that you put it that way.  Florida and the Andean cloud forests do have their differences.

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Missi
35 minutes ago, piping plovers said:

It Makes sense Missi now that you put it that way.  Florida and the Andean cloud forests do have their differences.

Ah to be in the cloud forest....*dreaming eyes*

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metalfan

I have most of my Anthuriums in coir baskets. They love it. This is my forgetii. I have the Dark form and a light form. And I am raising about 40 seedlings Yes, people have a misconception about FL. They think the whole state is warm and sunny all year long. I live in North Central FL, it does freeze here occasionally. If I didn;t have a greenhouse with a heater, I would not be able to grow these plants

IMG_6591.jpg

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piping plovers
On 4/22/2021 at 7:46 PM, metalfan said:

I have most of my Anthuriums in coir baskets. They love it. This is my forgetii. I have the Dark form and a light form. And I am raising about 40 seedlings Yes, people have a misconception about FL. They think the whole state is warm and sunny all year long. I live in North Central FL, it does freeze here occasionally. If I didn;t have a greenhouse with a heater, I would not be able to grow these plants

IMG_6591.jpg

I didn't realize that forgetii had such large leaves.  it looks very happy there.  My magnificum is pushing roots out of its new basket already, looking forward to some nice growth this summer.

,

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Dartolution

I have several (and I mean 30 crystalinums) anthurium, including the crystals, a magnificum, and an unidentified hybrid with huge velvety long leaves. 

I agree with the above stated. 

Sphagnum moss will encourage a ton of root growth, and after you get a good amount of roots, I typically repot mine into a sphagnum/phalenopsis orchid bark blend (better homes and gardens). 

This seems to work perfectly. 

Also, I've found that that do NOT like synthetic fertilizer, and every time I've used it it has cause malformed leafs, even at diluted concentrations. 

For me, they do best being watered with rain water/Distilled with seaweed extract added. 

Since I've been doing this, all of mine seem to be much happier.

I've had them for about a year. 

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piping plovers
On 4/24/2021 at 12:07 PM, Dartolution said:

I have several (and I mean 30 crystalinums) anthurium, including the crystals, a magnificum, and an unidentified hybrid with huge velvety long leaves. 

I agree with the above stated. 

Sphagnum moss will encourage a ton of root growth, and after you get a good amount of roots, I typically repot mine into a sphagnum/phalenopsis orchid bark blend (better homes and gardens). 

This seems to work perfectly. 

Also, I've found that that do NOT like synthetic fertilizer, and every time I've used it it has cause malformed leafs, even at diluted concentrations. 

For me, they do best being watered with rain water/Distilled with seaweed extract added. 

Since I've been doing this, all of mine seem to be much happier.

I've had them for about a year. 

Thanks for sharing those tips, much appreciated!

After reading that I placed a bucket under the gutter spout just before a big rain storm; now  have rainwater for the next waterings.  I'll keep an eye out for seaweed extract fertilizer as I have been fertilizing with a dilute Miracle Gro fertilizer.

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Dartolution
4 hours ago, piping plovers said:

Thanks for sharing those tips, much appreciated!

After reading that I placed a bucket under the gutter spout just before a big rain storm; now  have rainwater for the next waterings.  I'll keep an eye out for seaweed extract fertilizer as I have been fertilizing with a dilute Miracle Gro fertilizer.

@piping plovers get rid of that MG crap ASAP (obviously I'm not a fan). 

Blue Planet Nutrients seaweed extract is typically what I buy, but there are plenty of manufacturers to choose from (see amazon). 

Most of the Anthuriums that I experience with have remarkably similar care to Orchids. 

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metalfan
On 4/24/2021 at 12:07 PM, Dartolution said:

I have several (and I mean 30 crystalinums) anthurium, including the crystals, a magnificum, and an unidentified hybrid with huge velvety long leaves. 

I agree with the above stated. 

Sphagnum moss will encourage a ton of root growth, and after you get a good amount of roots, I typically repot mine into a sphagnum/phalenopsis orchid bark blend (better homes and gardens). 

This seems to work perfectly. 

Also, I've found that that do NOT like synthetic fertilizer, and every time I've used it it has cause malformed leafs, even at diluted concentrations. 

For me, they do best being watered with rain water/Distilled with seaweed extract added. 

Since I've been doing this, all of mine seem to be much happier.

I've had them for about a year. 

Mine get watered with well water that is very high in iron,  and dissolved minerals because it comes directly from filtering through the limestone into the Florida Aquifer. There isn't really any way to treat the water that goes out to the hose bibs in the greenhouse. Our house in on a water softener and an Iron Curtain filter, but the greenhouse water supply is separate. But it has never affected my plants in any way other than water stains on the leaves. I have used Dyna Gro for a while now like a year and a half,  and none of my plants have reacted adversely to it, before that I used Miracle Gro with a supplement of trace elements (for about 17 years) and none of them reacted badly to that either. 

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piping plovers
10 hours ago, Dartolution said:

@piping plovers get rid of that MG crap ASAP (obviously I'm not a fan). 

Blue Planet Nutrients seaweed extract is typically what I buy, but there are plenty of manufacturers to choose from (see amazon). 

Most of the Anthuriums that I experience with have remarkably similar care to Orchids. 

Thanks for recommending that Blue Planet product; it makes it easier to find a good one with all the options available online.  I'll try it on my anthuriums and orchids.  I've used MG for decades on my palms and house plants which has seemed okay but I had nothing to compare it with.  I do notice that it distorts my cattleya orchid growths at times.

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piping plovers
1 hour ago, metalfan said:

Mine get watered with well water that is very high in iron,  and dissolved minerals because it comes directly from filtering through the limestone into the Florida Aquifer. There isn't really any way to treat the water that goes out to the hose bibs in the greenhouse. Our house in on a water softener and an Iron Curtain filter, but the greenhouse water supply is separate. But it has never affected my plants in any way other than water stains on the leaves. I have used Dyna Gro for a while now like a year and a half,  and none of my plants have reacted adversely to it, before that I used Miracle Gro with a supplement of trace elements (for about 17 years) and none of them reacted badly to that either. 

I have city water now and it's known for its chlorine.  I think the city has gotten smarter over the years and is maybe  backing off chlorine and using the "swimming pool" kind of salts that no longer have the chlorine odor.  For years I had a well in the country with high iron content.  I am thinking well water would be better than treated city water.

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metalfan

I think it is, we have no chlorine. We never had iron either until Hurricane Irma did something to the water table in this area. Many people here soften their water to keep the limescale from building up in pipes and on plumbing fixtures and tile. That's not unusual. But the iron contamination started quite suddenly. Our water was so orange was had to spring for the Iron curtain. If my greenhouse was not as large as it is and partially planted, I could use water from the house. But over 1700 sq ft and over 1000 plants, I have to use a hose or my sprinkler system

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John hovancsek

Can anyone id these?

05ADF306-D492-4103-8381-6FA584BF9288.jpeg

B47C2EB5-9F68-44EC-8164-D8F489A2D08A.jpeg

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Dypsisdean
10 hours ago, John hovancsek said:

Can anyone id these?

Where did you get them? I posted in an Anthurium group and several think the one on the right might be a hybrid called "Circus Peanuts." And the one on the left may be A. waterbaryanum. If you can propagate either one of them (or are willing to cut), I have some rare Anthuriums you might be interested in working a trade for.

Here is Circus Peanuts - but I haven't heard of any before on this island - photo from Florida collector.

Circus.jpg

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metalfan

I have seen a lot of posts about Circus Peanuts. Its a VERY DESIRABLE PLANT. I agree that the plant on the left in that photo greatly resembles it. There is a huge growing velvet going around that looks quite like the big velvet John has that is being erroneously typed as an Anthurium hoffmanii. It seems to be a hybrid, and no one knows exactly what it is. A collector here in central FL has a huge one and everyone is stumped trying to ID it

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John hovancsek

They are not mine but do collect and have a few that I would cut. Pm me your info. I would love for o see your garden sometime 

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Dypsisdean
1 hour ago, John hovancsek said:

They are not mine but do collect and have a few that I would cut. Pm me your info. I would love for o see your garden sometime 

PM sent.

Another possibility for the one on the left is  kybutzii.

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piping plovers

My magnificum finally produced its first leaf since I owned it/repotted it  a few months ago.  Amazed how fast the leaves grow and expand. The new leaf dwarfs the original dried out ones.  What a difference roots make.  Current followed by previous conditions below.

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A459D734-3980-467F-B340-4E4AEF69EA8A.thumb.jpeg.a47cca52cd4a60586f478cc41be08584.jpeg

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Dartolution

Very good!  Looks like its on its way to recovery!

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piping plovers
57 minutes ago, Dartolution said:

Very good!  Looks like its on its way to recovery!

Thanks!  I’ve been following your recommendations for rain water and avoiding the synthetic fertilizer.  Been using fish extract and when that runs out will try the seaweed extract.

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Dartolution

They seem to respond well to that! Mine are all outside until winter arrives and they are loving the heat, rain, and humidity. Fish emulsion and seaweed is a good combo! 

 

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metalfan

Am currently planting many seeds from my Magnificum! 

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piping plovers

Is my Anthurium vittarifolium getting sufficient light?  I thought the petioles were supposed to be shorter and the leaves long; my little one seems to have petioles too long like its reaching for light. Each new leaf is larger than the next though.   Anyone who grows these know? Pics below.  The brown stems  are what remains from cold damage shipping last December. thanks!

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metalfan

These are seedlings they won't be mature form for a bit

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metalfan

This is a somewhat older seedling than your, the leaves do get longer

IMG_9395.jpg

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piping plovers
1 hour ago, metalfan said:

This is a somewhat older seedling than your, the leaves do get longer

Thanks metalfan. Seeing your healthy seedling is helpful , I’m not so worried now. I guess the petioles are disproportionately large on a seedling til leaf size catches up.

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metalfan

I think Vittariifolium confuses a lot of people. They expect it to pop out of the seed with strap leaves LOL. It actually takes them a long while to totally differentiate.

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piping plovers
5 minutes ago, metalfan said:

I think Vittariifolium confuses a lot of people. They expect it to pop out of the seed with strap leaves LOL. It actually takes them a long while to totally differentiate.

Yes I am guilty of that lol.  Are you familiar with Anthurium pallidiflorum? What do you think of it?  Wondering if it has worthwhile attributes over the vittarifolium.

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metalfan

I have seen it but never collected it. If I am going to spring for another strap leaf, I want an Anthurium wendlingerii

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