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Loxahatchee Adam

Pigafetta Growth Over 1 Year in Loxahatchee, Florida

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Loxahatchee Adam

Pigafetta growth progress.  Temp was down to 33.4 F / 1 C approximately 1 month ago.   Located in Loxahatchee, Florida, USA
Pic 1: February 14, 2020
Pic 2: September 29, 2020
Pic 3: March 8, 2021

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redant

Cool, will be interesting to see how long this last. Never seen one in FL.

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PalmatierMeg

Never seen one either. Looks like it is growing "fur" in last photo. Keep us updated.

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Merlyn

Hahah, yeah "fur" indeed!  Just don't pet it!  :D It's starting to look like one of my potted cacti, one called Opuntia Polyacantha "Dark Knight."   

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palmnut-fry

Ahhh, this was David Fairchild's fav palm. It's extreme fast growth & hard timber ( and ability to grow from young age in cleared, poor soil condition-sites) makes it a good candidate for forest reclamation projects. Alas, Pigafetta was always a failed attempt by him over many decades so good luck! Fascinating genus and gorgeous when well-grown. I think the consensus is they require more heat & water than even Florida can provide ( and sure as hell more than TEXAS! LMAO~!)...no really, I'm crying inside:( 

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greysrigging

Back in the heyday of palm cultivation in Darwin ( '80's and '90's ), The piggies were a sought after exotic  'must have' species, despite being so heavily armoured with those ferocious spines. I succumbed to the urge to purchase, and indeed were very fast growing in our climate. But I used them in a general group planting regime as I was after the 'jungle' look.  Pigafetta in nature are a coloniser species and dont like competion or being crowded out in a cultivated garden setting. Mine sorta declined over some years and died off ( possibly not enough water in the 'dry season'.
Other enthusiasts growing them all reckoned they were more trouble than they were worth.....but the Botanical Gardens had several that were at least 60' tall, and indeed attained that height in a relatively short period of time.

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Loxahatchee Adam

I have this one planted in the most sheltered location of the property.  SE inset corner of the house.  It affords it the most wind protection that it can.  I had one growing before that made it through winter fine, but snapped at the base in a summer thunderstorm (winds will get up to 60+ MPH / 100 KPH).  I will likely keep this one support strapped for an indefinite while as a safety check.  They'll move up as it grows.

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John hovancsek

I have one planted in a wet spot and it seems like the more water the faster they grow. Mine is close to 3 yr from seed and is ready to put on trunk

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realarch

I used to have five of these, astounding growers. Within seven or eight years they must have gotten close to fifty feet tall. Well, three were uprooted in a tropical wind storm, that must have been spectacular. Now you see them, now you don’t. I had the other two cut down due to their proximity to the garden and the possible damage these monsters could inflict. The five were planted in the open space behind the property due to the massive and frequent frond drop from rocket ship growth. Plan well for these palms.

Tim

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Palmarum

May the cold never find it. If the genus was just a bit more cold tolerant, this palm and its cousin species would be so much more common in S. Florida. It would be a regular landscape palm in the situations the spines can be tolerated, until the leaves are elevated into the sky by a super-fast growth rate.

Ryan

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waykoolplantz

i really loved  mine...cold killed it.

good luck up there

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palmfriend

I had a young one grown from seed, very fast growth - but a typhoon shook it up heavily, it 

didn't make it. I guess wind is the greatest threat for this species, so all the best for it! 

Lars

 

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