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PsyPalm

Separating/repotting Areca palm cluster

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PsyPalm

Hey guys!  Last night I separated a few small Areca palms from a larger cluster and potted them individually.  I really like it when my palms aren't super overgrown/clumped together, I keep them very trimmed back and am trying to thin out clumps so you can really appreciate the delicate individual trunks as they start to form. 

Pics of palm before, after, and of the three smaller seedlings individually potted :)

Let me know what you guys think! Cheers :D

Loch

 

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JohnAndSancho

I love the vibe of the lighting in your home, man. 

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Steve Mac

Loch, I am with you, I usually like them separated but at that size they still look ok together. But at some stage since they are a clustering palm I think that had to be done sometime. Clustering palms can get messy especially when they are multi planted to start with.

And one other thing since you are in 'the states' it would be a good idea to start referring to plants by their 'up to date' specific or local common name. I think those plants are specifically known as Dypsis lutescens or commonly 'Golden cane palm'. In some parts of the world they are still known as Areca palms due to a previous classification. However there is still another current genus of Areca to which this plant probably does not belong. Using 'common' names' is sometimes confusing since common is not universal but the specific name is.

I know that you can post a pic of the label that says 'Areca palm,  Dypsis lutescens', but Areca is still not a good description to use.

In Australia and Mexico and other places we (some) still call Queen palms 'Cocos palms', and on an international forum like this that can be confusing too.

But mate they look good.

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PsyPalm
30 minutes ago, gtsteve said:

Loch, I am with you, I usually like them separated but at that size they still look ok together. But at some stage since they are a clustering palm I think that had to be done sometime. Clustering palms can get messy especially when they are multi planted to start with.

And one other thing since you are in 'the states' it would be a good idea to start referring to plants by their 'up to date' specific or local common name. I think those plants are specifically known as Dypsis lutescens or commonly 'Golden cane palm'. In some parts of the world they are still known as Areca palms due to a previous classification. However there is still another current genus of Areca to which this plant probably does not belong. Using 'common' names' is sometimes confusing since common is not universal but the specific name is.

I know that you can post a pic of the label that says 'Areca palm,  Dypsis lutescens', but Areca is still not a good description to use.

In Australia and Mexico and other places we (some) still call Queen palms 'Cocos palms', and on an international forum like this that can be confusing too.

But mate they look good.

Thanks Steve!  That's good to know about correctly naming everything, I'll be sure to do that from now on :)

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PsyPalm
2 hours ago, JohnAndSancho said:

I love the vibe of the lighting in your home, man. 

Thanks guys! :D

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sashaeffer

I just did the same but with much smaller clusters that Walmart was selling for under $7(and the nursery in Florida they came from called them Areca palms as well, but I get the significance of specifics)

I wanted a bunch of singles, not just clumps.  I've discovered I have to water them twice a week as shock hit them pretty good along with ultra fast draining soil as I was able to use most of what they came in, almost like a Orchid mix. Since I increased the watering the downfall is subsided. I just had to cut away the fronds that died off, but can now see new spears pushing.

Good luck!  It's nice to split clumps and get more palms for your money.

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PsyPalm
6 hours ago, sashaeffer said:

I just did the same but with much smaller clusters that Walmart was selling for under $7(and the nursery in Florida they came from called them Areca palms as well, but I get the significance of specifics)

I wanted a bunch of singles, not just clumps.  I've discovered I have to water them twice a week as shock hit them pretty good along with ultra fast draining soil as I was able to use most of what they came in, almost like a Orchid mix. Since I increased the watering the downfall is subsided. I just had to cut away the fronds that died off, but can now see new spears pushing.

Good luck!  It's nice to split clumps and get more palms for your money.

Good tips for watering following the repotting, I'll make sure they stay nice and hydrated! 

I attached some pics of a few of my smaller clusters of d. lutescans that I'm going to further separate out as they get bigger:)  I just love how delicate their leaves and petioles become as they mature past this stage, I'm planning on filling every corner of my place with them haha.

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PalmatierMeg

That's the way they should be grown so each individual palm clusters the way it wishes. Artificially clustering them causes them to outcompete one another. BTW, "areca palm" is a common name for Dypsis lutescens from Madagascar. True Arecas are from an Asian genus of tropical palms. Welcome to PalmTalk.

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PsyPalm
20 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

That's the way they should be grown so each individual palm clusters the way it wishes. Artificially clustering them causes them to outcompete one another. BTW, "areca palm" is a common name for Dypsis lutescens from Madagascar. True Arecas are from an Asian genus of tropical palms. Welcome to PalmTalk.

Thanks Meg! :D

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