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MASOALA JASON

Sabal uresana in Austin, Texas

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MASOALA JASON

Brahea moorei

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MASOALA JASON

Trachycarpus princeps 

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MASOALA JASON

Trachycarpus wagnerianus. The original post showed minimal damage initially after snowstorm. It eventually fully defoliated but came back well. There are two individuals in the garden both have had full restored health 

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MASOALA JASON

Cycas panzhihuaensis. Never really flinched apart from cosmetic leaf damage 

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MASOALA JASON

Dioon edule var. angustifolium on right and Dioon edule on left 

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MASOALA JASON

Dioon edule 

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MASOALA JASON

Dioon edule var. angustifolium

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MASOALA JASON

Chamaerops humilis var cerifera. I am aware of the most updated variety designation but I do not really care as I prefer the old :)

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MASOALA JASON

The Phoenix palms and Brahea armata did not make it due to post recovery fungal issues 

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MASOALA JASON

Forgot to add the smaller Brahea moorei. Right on center, foreground 

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Meangreen94z

You didn’t protect your Dioon at all? Did they burn at all? The Angustfolium at Zilker looked great, and the Edule under a tree at Barton Springs Nursery took almost no damage.

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Collectorpalms

I like your garden a lot. I think I started liking palms for their height and neglected the shorter ones. Now I want to go the other way if I have a chance to do it over again. Tall palms too much to deal with if they die.

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Fusca

Nice recoveries @MASOALA JASON  Here is my uresana that was also unprotected last February in San Antonio.  Mine is more likely the coastal variety and pushed 4 new leaves since the freeze with a 5th on the way.  It's just starting to produce large fronds.

Jon

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Collectorpalms

The old Hort Gardens at A&M had two Sabal Uresanas planted next to each other. Back in 2010-2011, I could tell there was a growth difference and hardiness difference. I think going into 2021 the bigger must have been one of the largest in Texas, besides peckerwoods. Its now closed, but I snuck in to take a look, both were fried this time. So those at Peckerwood that look unscathed at 6F may have looked a lot different at 4F with heavy ice and snow. My largest coastal one, looked ok for awhile, but then wasnt able to push out its dead fronds. I trunk trunk cut it, and it looks good as new now. So even though its not that silver slate color, its still a great palm different from Palmetto. I was so dissipointed with it that it never looked like Peckerwoods I wanted to get rid of it. Glad I was too lazy!

Edited by Collectorpalms
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Jesse PNW

I bought a uresana knowing nothing about it, then later discovered it's not as hardy as a lot of Sabals.  How low of temps did these things see? 

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Fusca
5 minutes ago, Jesse PNW said:

I bought a uresana knowing nothing about it, then later discovered it's not as hardy as a lot of Sabals.  How low of temps did these things see? 

My coastal variety saw 9° and 13° on consecutive nights along with some ice and snow.  All existing fronds had some freeze damage and left on the palm but I trimmed off the dead tissue.

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MASOALA JASON

Photo from today of Sabal uresana lowland, faster-growing form 

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Meangreen94z
2 hours ago, Jesse PNW said:

I bought a uresana knowing nothing about it, then later discovered it's not as hardy as a lot of Sabals.  How low of temps did these things see? 

It’s among the hardiest of Sabals?

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MASOALA JASON

Dioon were covered in freeze cloth and all leaves burnt but no damage to stem 

I had a low of 8F on morning of February 15th and 7F on morning of February 16th. Starting on previous Thursday there was freezing rain that was followed by a large snowfall event then freezing rain then more snow. Temperatures remained below freezing for a consecutive 144 hours. 

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Jesse PNW
5 minutes ago, Meangreen94z said:

It’s among the hardiest of Sabals?

I guess I read it in the freeze damage data here, that it was being damaged in the mid teens.  I thought palmettos and minors were more hardy than that I guess. 

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Meangreen94z
3 minutes ago, Jesse PNW said:

I guess I read it in the freeze damage data here, that it was being damaged in the mid teens.  I thought palmettos and minors were more hardy than that I guess. 

The lowland green/grey form may start to burn at mid teens, but came back from low single digits and 5 days straight below freezing. I posted pictures in the freeze damage data for the highland silver/blue form that barely tip burned from 6*F at John Fairey Garden.

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Jesse PNW
Just now, Meangreen94z said:

The lowland green/grey form may start to burn at mid teens, but came back from low single digits and 5 days straight below freezing. I posted pictures in the freeze damage data for the highland silver/blue form that barely burned from 6*F.

What!  Anything that can take single digits is a real winner.  That's a truly cold hardy palm. 

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Meangreen94z
7 minutes ago, Jesse PNW said:

What!  Anything that can take single digits is a real winner.  That's a truly cold hardy palm. 

805CA62B-195E-4698-8E61-1E30245EE68F.thumb.jpeg.8c3e5eb82e8c0bfe12f1d6185508bb67.jpeg82E7D282-DA33-4394-9558-8BC523F8ACBA.thumb.jpeg.e312761089091349fcc55c7c63ab6d2a.jpegCAE2EEB5-38A1-4DC3-B398-E1E5DB5DCE21.thumb.jpeg.00fae6208d509634d67280b9e9aee68b.jpeg2669F1F5-4C74-43B9-9C48-C73B233D35FC.thumb.jpeg.60a4073bacc4ba896ce8396b3673813e.jpeg

^^above photos are after the freeze

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Meangreen94z

Here they are before the February 2021 freeze889FAF5B-31FB-4446-A737-D740F8C9A527.jpeg.23ea3d738634a22cdedafcdb249d8a2b.jpegA6BF7867-462A-4965-B10E-CAE61B82A9D5.jpeg.7e743168072840cffd0a70a13cdc1694.jpeg2B8C5EBF-FDC2-48F7-B5D3-2C234DD980EF.jpeg.c5da9f46fe56ae1da6d8317af9a143f8.jpeg

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Jesse PNW

What a MASSIVE Sabal!

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Xerarch

Those look awesome!

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Collectorpalms

Sabal Uresana 35 miles north at the neglected A&M Hort Gardens. 

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Collectorpalms

Nanno

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Edited by Collectorpalms
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Collectorpalms

Another better Brahea, Silver Med, and Siver Nanno.

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Swolte
On 3/7/2021 at 7:25 AM, MASOALA JASON said:

Trachycarpus princeps without appreciable damage

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What are those sticks for?

Thanks for all the updates! Spectacular yard, love to see those mature cycads!

I can confirm the observations regarding Urusana. We went down to 4F and the lowland form had some leaf damage whereas the highland form appeared unscathed.
:)

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MASOALA JASON

The sticks are for young plant protection against armadillos 

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Jesse PNW

I do the same thing.  But to protect against my chickens.  

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D Palm
6 hours ago, Jesse PNW said:

I bought a uresana knowing nothing about it, then later discovered it's not as hardy as a lot of Sabals.  How low of temps did these things see? 

I sprouted one from seed spring 2020 placed directly in ground. It’s fine after our wet low 22 F degree winter last year. Something chewed the straps to about 3 inches from the ground. Has like 7 strap leafs now. Sabals are slow, this one appears to be slower than avg. native Florida Sabal.

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Jesse PNW

Slugs chew a little bit at a time, but rats can demolish an entire seedling in like 30 seconds.  Those are the only 2 palm predators that I've dealt with here.  

If that's slower than the average Sabal, that gives me a little hope.  I've got a couple seedlings but would like to get more.  And some day, I'd love to have a handful of mature Sabal palmettos around my property.  I love the tall, cross-hatched trunks more than the fronds, but with Uresana's, the fronds are mesmerizing.  

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Chester B
12 hours ago, Jesse PNW said:

Slugs chew a little bit at a time, but rats can demolish an entire seedling in like 30 seconds.  Those are the only 2 palm predators that I've dealt with here.  

If that's slower than the average Sabal, that gives me a little hope.  I've got a couple seedlings but would like to get more.  And some day, I'd love to have a handful of mature Sabal palmettos around my property.  I love the tall, cross-hatched trunks more than the fronds, but with Uresana's, the fronds are mesmerizing.  

I have two down here, I know one for sure is the highlands form, the other looks identical being quite blue so have to assume they are the same type.  They've never shown damage but the coldest they've seen has only been 24F, and around 24 hours below freezing.  They seem to do fine with our wet winters, which is great.  However they are slow as molasses, if they continue to grow as they do now I'll be long gone before they reach my height.  I'm hoping they are working on their roots and start to take off next year (year 3).

Edited by Chester B

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SailorBold
On 12/12/2021 at 5:14 PM, Meangreen94z said:

The lowland green/grey form may start to burn at mid teens, but came back from low single digits and 5 days straight below freezing. I posted pictures in the freeze damage data for the highland silver/blue form that barely tip burned from 6*F at John Fairey Garden.

This may have been answered before... but are these the sabals that North Texas Cold Hardy Palms got the seeds from?  I wonder which variety mine is?

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Jimhardy

Nice Waggie and Princeps

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Chester B
10 hours ago, SailorBold said:

This may have been answered before... but are these the sabals that North Texas Cold Hardy Palms got the seeds from?  I wonder which variety mine is?

I’d like to know too. One of mine came from him as well. 

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Meangreen94z
11 hours ago, SailorBold said:

This may have been answered before... but are these the sabals that North Texas Cold Hardy Palms got the seeds from?  I wonder which variety mine is?

His were the “highlands” blue/silver form, but the seed were not from John Fairey Garden. Obviously this species is variable and I read one claim his weren’t quite as hardy. That could depend on size, location etc. but it seems most Uresana survived last February regardless of form or if they burned or not.

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