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MASOALA JASON

Sabal uresana in Austin, Texas

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MASOALA JASON

The recent polar vortex nuclear winter event caused immense destruction in many ways and I lost about 25% of my landscape. I had a low of 8F on morning of February 15th and 7F on morning of February 16th. Starting on previous Thursday there was freezing rain that was followed by a large snowfall event then freezing rain then more snow. Temperatures remained below freezing for a consecutive 144 hours. The Sabal uresana individuals in my yard had to remain uncovered as I ran out of freeze covers since I had put them on all my more sensitive plants. I have two forms of Sabal uresana in my yard. One is a faster growing lighter blue variety that purportedly was collected at slightly lower elevations in Sonora state Mexico. This variety sustained about 25% leaf burn. The other variety of Sabal uresana in my yard are from seeds collected from large individuals north of Houston at John Fairey Garden. The leaves of latter variety are much stiffer and the two individuals of this variety I have in my garden grow about 50% slower than former variety I mention. The latter variety came out unscathed!

I will attach photo of the former variety I mention first then will attach photos of two individuals I have of latter variety 

 

 

1.pdf 2.pdf 3.pdf

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MASOALA JASON

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MASOALA JASON

Latter variety/form 

 

 

 

2.jpg

3.jpg

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ahosey01

This kind of stuff adds a little sweet to the bitterness of this disaster. So much cold hardiness information, particularly in regard to native Sabal spp, is already being collected.

Like I said in another thread about a totally unphased group of Sabal minor... this is bonkers.

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amh

Interesting observations, where did you acquire the faster growing form from.

Also, is that a debaoensis hybrid I see.

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TexasColdHardyPalms

It's too soon to get an accurate leaf burn report. Another week with these 70s and sun will speed damage up a lot.  More and more live oaks are browing out up here.

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amh
1 hour ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

It's too soon to get an accurate leaf burn report. Another week with these 70s and sun will speed damage up a lot.  More and more live oaks are browing out up here.

Oaks are browning here too, I just hope the zone 6 rating is accurate. Good thing they will naturally loose their leaves soon.

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Xenon

Got halfway to College Station from Houston on SH 6 when I noticed all the brown live oaks. Robusta in CS look very very very dead. 

Edited by Xenon
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GoatLockerGuns
11 hours ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

More and more live oaks are browing out up here.

Noticed that here too.  I am seeing damage to many native species for this area.  Went for a run on the Leon Creek Greenway yesterday (more like "Brownway" right now), and every Vachellia farnesiana (Huisache) I saw had brown/burnt leaves.  I expect them to become completely defoliated within the next few weeks.  The Dermatophyllum secundiflorum (Texas Mountain Laurel) in my yard looks like it took some cold damage too.  Not sure about the current status of the local Prosopis glandulosa (Honey Mesquite), since they are still defoliated for winter; however, many of the trees I saw had started to bud prior to this Arctic Blast.  I can't imagine those buds survived.  The leaves on my Quercus virginiana (Southern Live Oak) are starting to darken in the warm weather.  I haven't seen the status of the native Quercus fusiformis (Plateau Live Oak) yet, but I would image they are fairing similarly.  Most of the Agave americana (Century Plant) around here do not look good either.

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Silas_Sancona
14 minutes ago, GoatLockerGuns said:

Noticed that here too.  I am seeing damage to many native species for this area.  Went for a run on the Leon Creek Greenway yesterday (more like "Brownway" right now), and every Vachellia farnesiana (Huisache) I saw had brown/burnt leaves.  I expect them to become completely defoliated within the next few weeks.  The Dermatophyllum secundiflorum (Texas Mountain Laurel) in my yard looks like it took some cold damage too.  Not sure about the current status of the local Prosopis glandulosa (Honey Mesquite), since they are still defoliated for winter; however, many of the trees I saw had started to bud prior to this Arctic Blast.  I can't imagine those buds survived.  The leaves on my Quercus virginiana (Southern Live Oak) are starting to darken in the warm weather.  I haven't seen the status of the native Quercus fusiformis (Plateau Live Oak) yet, but I would image they are fairing similarly.  Most of the Agave americana (Century Plant) around here do not look good either.

I'd be quite surprised to see a high kill rate among any of the native trees there.. ( since they evolved w/ the region's climate ) Vachellia farnesiana ( and others like rigidula, schaffneri ) will defoliate ( to some degree ) here some years. Imagine Southern Live Oak will slough off any damage and push new foliage vigorously as it warms up.  It's Coastal/near -coastal cousin in CA. will come back if torched in lower-mid intensity fires ( although they look like crappola right afterwards ) Imagine S. Live Oak are about as tough.. Older trees anyway.

Prosopis glandulosa will likely be fine.. though maybe suffer some degree of finer- sized twig/stem die back. As i'm sure you know, almost impossible to kill Mesquites lol. Same general thought regarding Texas Mtn. Laurel/ Olive, Sandpaper Tree ( Ehretia anacua ) and Leucanea retusa..

Much more curious about how things like Arroyo Sweetwood ( Myrospermum sousanum ), Monterey and Royal Oak ( among other Mex. Oak species being grown in various gardens there ).. and younger Montezuma Cypress specimens  planted around San Antonio/ Austin / elsewhere fare after this event.

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amh
5 hours ago, GoatLockerGuns said:

Noticed that here too.  I am seeing damage to many native species for this area.  Went for a run on the Leon Creek Greenway yesterday (more like "Brownway" right now), and every Vachellia farnesiana (Huisache) I saw had brown/burnt leaves.  I expect them to become completely defoliated within the next few weeks.  The Dermatophyllum secundiflorum (Texas Mountain Laurel) in my yard looks like it took some cold damage too.  Not sure about the current status of the local Prosopis glandulosa (Honey Mesquite), since they are still defoliated for winter; however, many of the trees I saw had started to bud prior to this Arctic Blast.  I can't imagine those buds survived.  The leaves on my Quercus virginiana (Southern Live Oak) are starting to darken in the warm weather.  I haven't seen the status of the native Quercus fusiformis (Plateau Live Oak) yet, but I would image they are fairing similarly.  Most of the Agave americana (Century Plant) around here do not look good either.

In my area the Dermatophyllum secundiflorum (Texas Mountain Laurel), Rhus virens (evergreen sumac) and Mahonia trifoliolata (agarita) are doing great, the Diospyros texana (Texas persimmon) have defoliated and the Quercus fusiformis (escarpment live oak) have browning leaves. Ulmus crassifolia (cedar elm) and Celtis laevigata (sugar hackberry) are zone 6 decidous, so they should be fine.

My area doesnt bloom till the end of march, but I imagine there has been damage.

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Swolte
10 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Prosopis glandulosa will likely be fine.. though maybe suffer some degree of finer- sized twig/stem die back. As i'm sure you know, almost impossible to kill Mesquites lol. Same general thought regarding Texas Mtn. Laurel/ Olive, Sandpaper Tree ( Ehretia anacua ) and Leucanea retusa..

Much more curious about how things like Arroyo Sweetwood ( Myrospermum sousanum ), Monterey and Royal Oak ( among other Mex. Oak species being grown in various gardens there ).. and younger Montezuma Cypress specimens  planted around San Antonio/ Austin / elsewhere fare after this event.

I protected most of these (frostblanket or a bucket with some hay) and they look they'll make it. I don't think the sandpaper tree would have made it through 3F as I get damage to the leaves at far higher temps. It's still young, though.

I did not protect Leucaena retusa so I am curious how that would fare as well. Scratch test does reveal some life but I'll be relieved when I see some buds grow. I also didn't protect the Monterey oak and, although it lost all leaves, it does look very much alive and I expect it to be budding out next month. I'll check on the young Montezuma (haven't looked).

I do have a rare weeping-branch variety of Montezuma that I did protect (as much as possible) but it did lose all new leaves (they were just coming out!). It better make it!

Edited by Swolte
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Silas_Sancona
4 minutes ago, Swolte said:

I protected most of these (frostblanket or a bucket with some hay) and they look they'll make it. I don't think the sandpaper tree would have made it through 3F as I get damage to the leaves at far lower temps. It's still young, though.

I did not protect Leucaena retusa so I am curious how that would fare as well. Scratch test does reveal some life but I'll be relieved when I see some buds grow. I also didn't protect the Monterey oak and, although it lost all leaves, it does look very much alive and I expect it to be budding out next month. I'll check on the young Montezuma (haven't looked).

I do have a rare weeping-branch variety of Montezuma that I did protect (as much as possible) but it did lose all new leaves (they were just coming out!). It better make it!

Surprisingly, Leucaena retusa is supposedly hardy to 5F, maybe lower so hopefully yours will survive... Hope the Weeping Montezuma does as well.

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Swolte
1 minute ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Surprisingly, Leucaena retusa is supposedly hardy to 5F, maybe lower so hopefully yours will survive... Hope the Weeping Montezuma does as well.

The golden leadball was surprisingly hard to find but would be replaceable. I had it grow 6 feet in a year (amazing) so it will fill up quick. Love the new foliage on these.

That type of weeping montezuma (it does not have a straight trunk) is practically irreplaceable so I'll be disappointed if it dies!

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Silas_Sancona
5 minutes ago, Swolte said:

The golden leadball was surprisingly hard to find but would be replaceable. I had it grow 6 feet in a year (amazing) so it will fill up quick. Love the new foliage on these.

That type of weeping montezuma (it does not have a straight trunk) is practically irreplaceable so I'll be disappointed if it dies!

Have to say, really nervous about the Mexican Oaks in Peckerwood's/ JF garden's collection.. Most are hardy.. Question is.. are hardy enough to survive this kind of event.. Stinks this had to happen the first year Houston Botanical is up and going too..

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Swolte

I am receiving the Houston Botanical Garden newletters and follow them on Facebook sometimes and I don't get the impression they were very concerned. In fact, they're opening the gardens up to the public already to enjoy. They were still able to tap into hordes of volunteer databases to help protect the plants and that was quite the operation. I wish I could say the same for JFGardens but they are less, how do you say... resilient, when it comes to manpower. I haven't heard much about the mexican oak collection yet but I did hear their Magnolia collection may have some casualties. I didn't even realize that as most of the magnolias that are commonly planted in residential areas look fine (mostly southern magnolia variants) but they had some rare specimens there from asia.

 

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Collectorpalms
On 2/22/2021 at 11:03 PM, Xenon said:

Got halfway to College Station from Houston on SH 6 when I noticed all the brown live oaks. Robusta in CS look very very very dead. 

They looked dead all the way to San Antonio.

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Matt N- Dallas
On 2/24/2021 at 9:34 PM, Swolte said:

I am receiving the Houston Botanical Garden newletters and follow them on Facebook sometimes and I don't get the impression they were very concerned. In fact, they're opening the gardens up to the public already to enjoy. They were still able to tap into hordes of volunteer databases to help protect the plants and that was quite the operation. I wish I could say the same for JFGardens but they are less, how do you say... resilient, when it comes to manpower. I haven't heard much about the mexican oak collection yet but I did hear their Magnolia collection may have some casualties. I didn't even realize that as most of the magnolias that are commonly planted in residential areas look fine (mostly southern magnolia variants) but they had some rare specimens there from asia.

 

I can’t speak for the state of any of the plants at the JF garden, but my magnolia Tamaulipas (originally from Peckerwood) survived the brutal cold in Dallas.  

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OC2Texaspalmlvr
5 minutes ago, Matt N- Dallas said:

I can’t speak for the state of any of the plants at the JF garden, but my magnolia Tamaulipas (originally from Peckerwood) survived the brutal cold in Dallas.

Matt how did your garden fare ?

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MASOALA JASON

Photos of most of my in ground palms 2 + weeks post SNOVID here in Austin, Texas 

 

See original comments of recorded low and hours below freezing. I wrapped frost covers around most palms, over them on some and on others just around growing point region. The only palms I did not cover were Sabal uresana. The photos of these two individuals attached are from seeds collected from individuals at John Fairey Garden north of Houston. This form has much stiffer leaves than another form I have and only had small amount of leaf burn.

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MASOALA JASON

This form of Sabal uresana is from North Texas Cold Hardy Palms and has less stiff leaves but grows about 50% faster than form on above post. It seems to be slightly less cold hardy but looks like it will survive and newest leaves and central growing region already pushing a new leaf. 

IMG-3325.jpg

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MASOALA JASON

I have collected and planted many forms of Sabal minor and all just shrugged at arctic blast, even the ones I had just planted last fall as juveniles. 

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MASOALA JASON

I have two individuals of Brahea decumbens and both responded a little different to cold. The smaller individual is closer to house and had less damage. The larger individual that was more exposed burnt more but central growing region still holding tight without signs of rot. 

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MASOALA JASON

I have or maybe had two individuals of Phoenix loureiroi var. humilis 'Kashmir'

The larger one next to house has green on rachis of newest leafs and newest leafs and strong and without rot. The smaller individual had all newest leafs rot and were easily pulled out. The latter will be replaced by something else. 

 

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MASOALA JASON

What had been a most beautiful individual of Brahea 'clara' just a few weeks ago looks absolutely melted but central growing region and newest leafs holding tight. 

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MASOALA JASON

What was sold to me as Sabal 'lisa' but morphed back into original Sabal palmetto form looks about perfect. 

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MASOALA JASON

Trachycarpus princeps without appreciable damage

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MASOALA JASON

Two individuals of Trachycarpus fortunei 'Wagnerianus' with slight burning at ends of some leaves 

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MASOALA JASON

Two different individuals of Brahea moorei. The larger individual which has been in ground for 3 years had more damage but some green left on newest leaf and central growing region holding tight. The younger individual planted last year and in more exposed location had less damage and looks like it will survive

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MASOALA JASON

Chamaerops humilis var. argentea with slight damage 

 

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Swolte
1 hour ago, MASOALA JASON said:

What had been a most beautiful individual of Brahea 'clara' just a few weeks ago looks absolutely melted but central growing region and newest leafs holding tight. 

I am in a similar boat as you with this one. I had protected it with frost cloth AND a large amount of hay but I am not sure it will make it (mine is smaller). In fact, it may be one of the few I cared about a lot that will die on me. 

Thanks for posting these updates! Impressive collection. I hope they will pull through.

Edited by Swolte

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