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jfrye01@live.com

Native Dallas County, TX Sabal minor in habitat

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jfrye01@live.com

This past week, I escaped the frozen tundra formerly known as Sedgwick County, Kansas...now known as New Siberia...;) I spent a few days with friends in Dallas, which wasn't much better.  Temperatures hit near zero.  Despite the cold, one of my friends and I, also a palm nut, decided to go look for Sabal minor SE of Dallas, in the Seagoville area. Tony (I believe an active member here) pointed us in the right direction, and wouldn't ya know, we found them! I'm not too sure I was supposed to be walking where I was, but I just had to take some pictures...these things are absolutely massive! I'd compare them to the native Sabals I saw in south Louisiana several years ago. I love seeing these things in the wild.  Hopeful to propagate these and plant them around up here in the Wichita area! 

May be an image of tree and nature

May be an image of tree and nature

May be an image of Jacob Frye, nature and tree

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chinandega81

I hope they survive this artic invasion. They look great in your pics...definantly worth paying a visit to that park again in a few months to see how they are doing once it warms up.

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Palmaceae

It will be interesting to see how they handled the freeze.

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jfrye01@live.com
2 hours ago, chinandega81 said:

I hope they survive this artic invasion. They look great in your pics...definantly worth paying a visit to that park again in a few months to see how they are doing once it warms up.

I'm not even slightly worried about them, they've been through this many times over the last several hundred years ;) I have personally seen Sabal minor here in Kansas survive -11F with surprisingly little damage, they sure are tough! 

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jfrye01@live.com
1 hour ago, Palmaceae said:

It will be interesting to see how they handled the freeze.

They will no doubt be fine. The DFW area experienced temperatures anywhere from -1F to 5F. I have never seen that kill or even heavily damage S. minor.

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Xerarch

Incredible that any palm could be native to such a place that can see temps below 0.  We have an interesting scenario in the southern US, high average winter temps but still subject to extreme cold on occasion.  I guess nature doesn't want to waste the high average temps so it gave us palms like Sabal minor, Sabal Palmetto, Sabal Mexicana, and Rhapidophyllum hystrix.  All these are among the most cold tolerant in the world. 

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palmnut-fry

Xerarch- it's  a not typical to have it get that cold in maybe once a generation so by then a plant can become fully entrenched. And these grow in mucky heavy clay which affords even more "cold protection", as if they need it. I suspect the minors native all through the Gulf South (from Ark to the Carolinas) have seen there stands increase as we have come out of the most recent ice age. Believe it's the natural border to where the permanent ice shelf was located, or damned close!  still cannot believe they can be sustained up in Kansas without protection! Amazing

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Xerarch
7 minutes ago, palmnut-fry said:

Xerarch- it's  a not typical to have it get that cold in maybe once a generation so by then a plant can become fully entrenched. And these grow in mucky heavy clay which affords even more "cold protection", as if they need it. I suspect the minors native all through the Gulf South (from Ark to the Carolinas) have seen there stands increase as we have come out of the most recent ice age. Believe it's the natural border to where the permanent ice shelf was located, or damned close!  still cannot believe they can be sustained up in Kansas without protection! Amazing

Exactly, but if it gets that cold ever, no matter how rare, the native flora must either be able to tolerate it or will be eliminated from that part of their range.  In this case, they just tolerate it.

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Collectorpalms
On 2/18/2021 at 9:50 AM, jfrye01@live.com said:

This past week, I escaped the frozen tundra formerly known as Sedgwick County, Kansas...now known as New Siberia...;) I spent a few days with friends in Dallas, which wasn't much better.  Temperatures hit near zero.  Despite the cold, one of my friends and I, also a palm nut, decided to go look for Sabal minor SE of Dallas, in the Seagoville area. Tony (I believe an active member here) pointed us in the right direction, and wouldn't ya know, we found them! I'm not too sure I was supposed to be walking where I was, but I just had to take some pictures...these things are absolutely massive! I'd compare them to the native Sabals I saw in south Louisiana several years ago. I love seeing these things in the wild.  Hopeful to propagate these and plant them around up here in the Wichita area! 

May be an image of tree and nature

May be an image of tree and nature

May be an image of Jacob Frye, nature and tree

What date were this pictures taken? Did any have a trunk or evidence of being more than 31 years old.

Edited by Collectorpalms

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