Jump to content
ahosey01

Palmageddon Aftermath Photo Thread

Recommended Posts

Xenon
9 hours ago, Axel Amsterdam said:

Hi Texans, 

Did any of the queens regrow a full set of fronds after complete defoliation?

I mean, is 5 new fronds possible after such a devastating winter event? 

 

Even a few of the tiny percent of queen palms in Houston that survived are at 5 leaves or past that. The first few leaves are deformed/stunted however. 

If you go far enough south towards the border, most queens did not defoliate and many already look like nothing happened. Even some royals and foxtails are past 5 leaves and looking half decent. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte

My queen was completely defoliated (protected, though, by blankets) after the freeze. Definitely came out worse than my Filibusta or Filifera which reinforced the idea that it really was a pure-ish queen. The first pic is the dwarf growth it was pushing by the end of May. Looks  more like a Washingtonia Wagnerianus, no? :P The other picture is what it looks like now (just went out to take a night shoot). I counted 9 fronds (excluding spear, including one dwarf petiole that turned brown). 

IMG_8191.jpg

Queen.jpg

 

Edited by Swolte
  • Like 4
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Axel Amsterdam

Streetview updated some larger streets in Corpus Christi in April 2021.

Here are 2 large queens and a large yucca elephantipes. The queen on the left already pushed out new growth by April 2021.  

https://goo.gl/maps/oFt14hBRnKffthWZ7

Edited by Axel Amsterdam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MesquiteRetreat

FYI, I’m eight miles southeast of San Benito and all our Foxtails (all 20) and Royals (all 4) perished. We watched and waited and hoped...but we lost them all...in fact, they smelled pretty harsh when we finally gave up and cut them down. We had one larger Royal that was even pushing green for a while, but then by late August it turned and died. Same with all our neighbors...no Foxtails and Royals, that I know of, made it in my immediate area. All our Washies (4), Queens (2), Chinese (1), Sabal (1), Mediterranean (1) and Sylvesters (2) did fine. Bismarcks (2) looked a tad harsh and we wound up cutting off a dozen or more fronds from the “big” one, but now they look fine. Our two Cardboards “palms” looked dead, but bounced back fast. Both Arecas died to the ground, but one is making a comeback, albeit very slowly. Our little Lady Finger, which died to the ground, is coming back, too. We had three groups of Pygmy’s...all of which looked horrid. Several centers pulled out immediately...and all fronds were brown. After applying lots of copper fungicide, one group that was a four is now a two and two groups that were both threes are now ones...these were all slow deaths.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
8 minutes ago, MesquiteRetreat said:

FYI, I’m eight miles southeast of San Benito and all our Foxtails (all 20) and Royals (all 4) perished. We watched and waited and hoped...but we lost them all...in fact, they smelled pretty harsh when we finally gave up and cut them down. We had one larger Royal that was even pushing green for a while, but then by late August it turned and died. Same with all our neighbors...no Foxtails and Royals, that I know of, made it in my immediate area. All our Washies (4), Queens (2), Chinese (1), Sabal (1), Mediterranean (1) and Sylvesters (2) did fine. Bismarcks (2) looked a tad harsh and we wound up cutting off a dozen or more fronds from the “big” one, but now they look fine. Our two Cardboards “palms” looked dead, but bounced back fast. Both Arecas died to the ground, but one is making a comeback, albeit very slowly. Our little Lady Finger, which died to the ground, is coming back, too. We had three groups of Pygmy’s...all of which looked horrid. Several centers pulled out immediately...and all fronds were brown. After applying lots of copper fungicide, one group that was a four is now a two and two groups that were both threes are now ones...these were all slow deaths.

Wow you must be in a cold spot. Survival is a lot higher in Brownsville (the warmest spot) and to a lesser extent the coast and the built up corridor along US-83 in Hidalgo county. 

image.png.bbde9e7239fe284c631e1a321a531c36.png

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MesquiteRetreat

Maybe so. Lots of lost Foxtails and Royals in San Benito proper, too. Just a few miles can make a great difference. Your photo makes me even sadder for my lost Royals.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Axel Amsterdam

This picture shows the damage on Roebelini? and on the robusta's.  A large armata is completely unscathed.

Schermafbeelding 2021-09-30 om 21.59.57.png

Edited by Axel Amsterdam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oliver

Brownsville Royal Palm update. If you had asked me in June how many of the large Royals in Brownsville survived, I would have said 80%. However now, it seems lije a huge amount have dropped their crowns after showing new green fronds. I think it's down to less than 10%. I think that aggressively removing dead fronds early was a mistake. I have 9 at my house and seven at my office to which I did nothing. All alive. My neighbours on both sides at my house trimmed theirs as a new green frond emerged and all died. We have exactly the same exposure so I see no other variables.

20210930_152940.jpg

20210930_153005.jpg

20210930_153030.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MesquiteRetreat
1 hour ago, oliver said:

Brownsville Royal Palm update. If you had asked me in June how many of the large Royals in Brownsville survived, I would have said 80%. However now, it seems lije a huge amount have dropped their crowns after showing new green fronds. I think it's down to less than 10%. I think that aggressively removing dead fronds early was a mistake. I have 9 at my house and seven at my office to which I did nothing. All alive. My neighbours on both sides at my house trimmed theirs as a new green frond emerged and all died. We have exactly the same exposure so I see no other variables.

20210930_152940.jpg

20210930_153005.jpg

20210930_153030.jpg

We left our Royals totally alone...didn't trim them or remove dead fronds. But all four of ours were much smaller than what you have in your photos. Three gave up the ghost pretty early, although we still held off cutting them down until the trunks were actually mushy. Yes, we were hoping beyond hope. Our fourth won gave us great promise. He was the largest and everyone that saw it, even some "professionals", said, "Wow...that one will make it." But, alas, at the end of August any green it had pushed, rapidly turned to brown. It really went so fast...we were surprised at the speed. Guess it was dying all along...although the trunk was still solid. Stunk badly when we had it removed. We may be crazy, but we planted another baby Royal in its place.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xerarch
18 hours ago, Axel Amsterdam said:

Streetview updated some larger streets in Corpus Christi in April 2021.

Here are 2 large queens and a large yucca elephantipes. The queen on the left already pushed out new growth by April 2021.  

https://goo.gl/maps/oFt14hBRnKffthWZ7

I was going to make a joke right after the freeze that Google Street View needs to hurry and go photograph everything while it looks terrible. That’s what they do after every cold year it seems. 2011 photos were on there forever with everything looking like trash. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reyes Vargas
3 hours ago, MesquiteRetreat said:

We may be crazy, but we planted another baby Royal in its place.

Not crazy at all.  The good thing about royals is that they grow so fast.  Water the heck out of it and fertilize and you will have a large palm in no time.  I planted one myself as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
54 minutes ago, Xerarch said:

I was going to make a joke right after the freeze that Google Street View needs to hurry and go photograph everything while it looks terrible. That’s what they do after every cold year it seems. 2011 photos were on there forever with everything looking like trash. 

Yeah it's crazy how they pick the absolute worst time to do streetview. April 2021 after the worst freeze since 1989 and March 2011 after the second worst freeze since 1989:rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DallasPalms

Here are a few that made it through nicely. Again we spent a week below freezing and almost half that time below 20F... lowest point was 2F...

I saw some Brazoria types that were taken down. I just passed this one with another palm nearby. Its doing something funny with a spear growing from the base

 

20211001_112118.jpg

20211001_112139.jpg

20211001_112103.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DallasPalms

This is one of the Bank of America palms that I posted for an i.d. it had a palmetto look but large seeds. Recovered nicely. The other boa palm was removed 

20210930_104439.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DallasPalms

This is a giant Mexicana I think, the one I call Texana.  maybe a cross... I passed by yesterday and looks like she recovered nicely though the petioles are not as long as they were before. Also short seed stalks last year they were about as long as the super long leaves. The trunk meets leaves at around 6 feet.

Third pic is last year when I could not see much of the trunk. 

A median palm in between 6 lanes

20210930_102732.jpg

20210930_103008.jpg

20201117_132648.jpg

Edited by DallasPalms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Austinpalm
20 hours ago, oliver said:

Brownsville Royal Palm update. If you had asked me in June how many of the large Royals in Brownsville survived, I would have said 80%. However now, it seems lije a huge amount have dropped their crowns after showing new green fronds. I think it's down to less than 10%. I think that aggressively removing dead fronds early was a mistake. I have 9 at my house and seven at my office to which I did nothing. All alive. My neighbours on both sides at my house trimmed theirs as a new green frond emerged and all died. We have exactly the same exposure so I see no other variables.

20210930_152940.jpg

20210930_153005.jpg

20210930_153030.jpg

Sorry to hear that.  I think we had about 80% die off of royals under 20ft.  Above that, I would say at least 40% survived.

 

On a good note, the Veitchia in my neighbors backyard is finally starting to put on a new frond.  Until this point, it only had a green crownshaft.  Tough palm I guess.  The frond has gone from not visible to about 6-9 inches tall in 2 days. This is the only Veithchia on the island I know of that has survived til this point.  Still looks rough.  But, if we can get an average winter, I bet it will be ok.

 

 

Veitchia.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
28 minutes ago, Austinpalm said:

 

On a good note, the Veitchia in my neighbors backyard is finally starting to put on a new frond.  Until this point, it only had a green crownshaft.  Tough palm I guess.  The frond has gone from not visible to about 6-9 inches tall in 2 days. This is the only Veithchia on the island I know of that has survived til this point.  Still looks rough.  But, if we can get an average winter, I bet it will be ok.

 

 

 

 

Wow that’s amazing. Are all of the SPI coconuts dead? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Austinpalm

I have looked for some time to find a coconut palm that survived February 2021.  I have heard of plants in Brownsville but have not been able to check on them yet.  To my knowledge, the only coconut palm that survived this past winter at SPI is a seedling I planted and tried to protect.  The small greenhouse I built around it was quickly blown away by the 35+ mph winds we had for about 1 and a half weeks around the event.   However, the nut and growing point were low enough to be protected in the ground.  I recently sold that house/yard but it is still alive to date.  The palm was acquired on ebay as a germinated nut.  I have since planted 4 more coconuts at my new home.  We'll see what happens.  :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon

Here's an update from Katy:

Found some freaks of nature. Bad news is that a lot of robusta, date palms, and L. chinensis that initially recovered are dropping dead. Drive by/zoom photos

Bismarckia survives 12-13 degrees??? Am I dreaming?

20211001_153655.thumb.jpg.040e39fd8dccb2578fca168b0e9a3f06.jpg

Mutant queen palm

20211001_165122.thumb.jpg.6e18285cbb1341013de9d59f1a0a7385.jpg

20211001_163640.thumb.jpg.d4089d9f11a2ce183843bec49cc8bacc.jpg

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xerarch
4 hours ago, Xenon said:

Here's an update from Katy:

Found some freaks of nature. Bad news is that a lot of robusta, date palms, and L. chinensis that initially recovered are dropping dead. Drive by/zoom photos

Bismarckia survives 12-13 degrees??? Am I dreaming?

20211001_153655.thumb.jpg.040e39fd8dccb2578fca168b0e9a3f06.jpg

 

How is that Bizzy alive?, very large specimens are dead all over town here, and at higher temps than that ~18 degrees. Oddly enough there is a nursery here with a number of them in pots that survived, with significant damage. A worker there was unable to tell me that they had any protection. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
1 hour ago, Xerarch said:

How is that Bizzy alive?, very large specimens are dead all over town here, and at higher temps than that ~18 degrees. Oddly enough there is a nursery here with a number of them in pots that survived, with significant damage. A worker there was unable to tell me that they had any protection. 

Must be some kind of voodoo. This is at an apartment complex and I personally photographed these palms a few hours before the cold front arrived. There were originally 5, only this one is "alive". 

I think there may be some more alive closer to town too. Need to go check on them 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
philinsydney
On 10/1/2021 at 12:20 PM, Xenon said:

Yeah it's crazy how they pick the absolute worst time to do streetview. April 2021 after the worst freeze since 1989 and March 2011 after the second worst freeze since 1989:rolleyes:

I noticed a lot of dead Cook pines in the latest pictures, even in the RGV. I thought they might have done better. The similar looking Norfolk island pines have been rated Zone 8 I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
12 hours ago, philinsydney said:

I noticed a lot of dead Cook pines in the latest pictures, even in the RGV. I thought they might have done better. The similar looking Norfolk island pines have been rated Zone 8 I think.

Yeah they did horribly across the board. There are a few shorter trees in warmer areas that are maybe half green +/-.

The delayed death of the Cook pines was pretty bizarre. They looked fine until about sometime in March/April then promptly crisped up. 

Lots of more "tropical" trees did a lot better. There are some large Ficus microcarpa that only froze back to the lower main branches. Some Delonix regia and mangos froze back above the main trunk. Bombax ceiba did surprisingly well and only froze back to the lower main branches. 

By the look of things now, there will be plenty of royals and foxtails left in the RGV. Survival is about 50/50 in Brownsville and far southern Hidalgo county. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xerarch
4 hours ago, Xenon said:

Yeah they did horribly across the board. There are a few shorter trees in warmer areas that are maybe half green +/-.

The delayed death of the Cook pines was pretty bizarre. They looked fine until about sometime in March/April then promptly crisped up. 

Lots of more "tropical" trees did a lot better. There are some large Ficus microcarpa that only froze back to the lower main branches. Some Delonix regia and mangos froze back above the main trunk. Bombax ceiba did surprisingly well and only froze back to the lower main branches. 

By the look of things now, there will be plenty of royals and foxtails left in the RGV. Survival is about 50/50 in Brownsville and far southern Hidalgo county. 

Agreed, I've seen a number of Ficus, large and small that have at least resprouted from the base, even saw a mango regrowing the other day, ceiba have quite a bit of regrowth already.  But Cook pine/any araucaria I've seen are completely dead, no regrowth at all, and many of these are good size 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oliver

As far as Royals go in Brownsville. My estimate is that only 10% survived. I have not seen a single foxtail that survived. My 2 at the office just dropped their crowns last month after spouting 3 or 4 green leaves. I do have 2 clumps of Norfolk Pines which are showing new green growth all the way to the top, although I have not seen any others that are alive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Austinpalm
1 hour ago, oliver said:

As far as Royals go in Brownsville. My estimate is that only 10% survived. I have not seen a single foxtail that survived. My 2 at the office just dropped their crowns last month after spouting 3 or 4 green leaves. I do have 2 clumps of Norfolk Pines which are showing new green growth all the way to the top, although I have not seen any others that are alive.

Very unfortunate about the foxtails in Brownsville.  Here at SPI, I feel that the foxtails outperformed the royals by a slight margin. I would say that 40-50% survived and most are on their 3rd or 4th frond now.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oliver

I'm not sure what happened to the foxtails here. I had 5 about 20 ft of trunk, producing fruit for 10 yrs. 2 died immediately and 3 seemed to recover but all suddenly died 7 months post freeze. The crowns fell with 3 or 4 green normal looking fronds still attached?????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Reyes Vargas
2 hours ago, oliver said:

As far as Royals go in Brownsville. My estimate is that only 10% survived. I have not seen a single foxtail that survived. My 2 at the office just dropped their crowns last month after spouting 3 or 4 green leaves. I do have 2 clumps of Norfolk Pines which are showing new green growth all the way to the top, although I have not seen any others that are alive.

That is weird that no Foxtails survived in Brownsville.  I have seen about 3 in Weslaco that have made it.  They were planted close to a concrete wall so that helped a lot.

Edited by Reyes Vargas
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DallasPalms

We saw one side of Palmageddon, by freezing and ice. But Palmageddon continues around the world. Here is a video of Canary Island which is currently seeing Palmageddon by Fire and Brimstone...

Gory stuff.

Meanwhile Florida is planning an artificial government managed  Palmageddon https://miami.cbslocal.com/2021/10/23/florida-is-ditching-palm-trees-to-fight-the-climate-crisis/

Here is another video of La Palma showing some lava crawling into a pool just before burning up some beautiful palms.  Alot of people have been displaced. Alot of homes turned to ash already and some number over 10,000 evacuated

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DreaminAboutPalms

Robusta hybrid flowering after this years weather.... In North Austin btw. This one's built different 

thumbnail_image1-1.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gottagrowemall
On 9/30/2021 at 2:02 PM, Xenon said:

Wow you must be in a cold spot. Survival is a lot higher in Brownsville (the warmest spot) and to a lesser extent the coast and the built up corridor along US-83 in Hidalgo county. 

image.png.bbde9e7239fe284c631e1a321a531c36.png

 

What kind of temps did you experience in this area?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
19 minutes ago, Gottagrowemall said:

What kind of temps did you experience in this area?

Friend sent me that pic taken in central Brownsville which saw a low of 24F. From what he tells me, 30-50% of the trunking royals in southern Cameron county and southernmost Hidalgo county (along and south of US-83) survived. The highest % are in central/se Brownsville and hugging the border in Hidalgo county (south Mission, Hidalgo, etc). Large trunking foxtails performed similarly.

I know of two confirmed living coconuts in the Brownsville Area but both are rather small (just beginning to trunk) and probably benefited from ground heat and less wind. I haven't been able to confirm the status of some of the largest coconuts in the state but they are probably dead. 

@mgmccabe

 

Edited by Xenon
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gottagrowemall
21 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Friend sent me that pic taken in central Brownsville which saw a low of 24F. From what he tells me, 30-50% of the trunking royals in southern Cameron county and southernmost Hidalgo county (along and south of US-83) survived. The highest % are in central/se Brownsville and hugging the border in Hidalgo county (south Mission, Hidalgo, etc). Large trunking foxtails performed similarly.

I know of two confirmed living coconuts in the Brownsville Area but both are rather small (just beginning to trunk) and probably benefited from ground heat and less wind. I haven't been able to confirm the status of some of the largest coconuts in the state but they are probably dead. 

@mgmccabe

 

That’s pretty freaking amazing thanks for sharing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Arecaceae78743
On 9/30/2021 at 3:37 PM, oliver said:

Brownsville Royal Palm update. If you had asked me in June how many of the large Royals in Brownsville survived, I would have said 80%. However now, it seems lije a huge amount have dropped their crowns after showing new green fronds. I think it's down to less than 10%. I think that aggressively removing dead fronds early was a mistake. I have 9 at my house and seven at my office to which I did nothing. All alive. My neighbours on both sides at my house trimmed theirs as a new green frond emerged and all died. We have exactly the same exposure so I see no other variables.

20210930_152940.jpg

20210930_153005.jpg

20210930_153030.jpg

LIVE AND LEARN !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MesquiteRetreat

I'd add that Foxtails seem to have suffered the same fate as the Royals. Many held on for a while, but then perished. We lost 20 Foxtails. All our neighbors lost their Foxtails, too. As I drive around the San Benito/Harlingen area, I don't see any Royals or Foxtails that survived. Of course, there could be a few scattered around, but I've not seen any. All I see are new replacements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowNight030

Updates from Louisiana 

here in central LA (I’m 40ish minutes from Alexandria), we hit around 12/13. All of the livistonia in my area are pushing lots of new growth. Many of the Washingtonia are alive (all survivors of 2018), although a handful didnt make it. Sabal, butia, and windmills were untouched. Chamaerops initially looked just mildly burned, although many now are dying. My clump of 3 only had one trunk survive. CIDP all survived. Medjools are iffy. Only one Sylvester survived. No surviving queens, pygmies, or majesties (although I replanted my majesty). All my Cajun hibiscus survived without protection, and are coming back from the roots. Same with bougainvillea, ficus elestica, pink guava, Barbados cherry, and most citrus. Satsumas defoliated, but all came back with minor tip damage. Older Oranges and grapefruit had major damage, but survived. Lemons and limes are gone.  My bottlebrush are in full bloom at the moment. Sagos have flushed back out. Some large oleander leafed back out, some died to the ground. Japanese blueberries have spotty growth on old wood. My orange bird of paradise bloomed 4 times in July/August. 
 

in Lafayette (they hit around 15), all but a few Washingtonia survived. No surviving queens. My aunt had a few around her pool and all were replaced in June. A woman I know has her jacaranda resprouting from the roots. 
 

Baton Rouge (high teens), most Washingtonia survived. I got lost there back in June, and found a living bismarckia in a neighborhood. Didnt grab a photo. No living queens to my knowledge. The few I knew of were removed this spring. 
 

New Orleans (high to mid 20s), most everything seems fine. Haven’t seen anything on the few royals around the city. The large majesties seem fine. Queens and bismarkia were untouched. In a Facebook group I’m in, someone posted a photo recently of their fruiting mango in Kenner I believe. On magazine Street, theres a huge jacaranda behind a bed and breakfast that seems to have made it with little damage. I saw a photo of a rainbow eucalyptus that seemed to have survived, however the recent hurricane knocked it down in an update. 
 

Shreveport (low single digits), all washingtonia, chamaerops, and butia have died to my knowledge. Windmills damaged but seem ok. People were shocked earlier this spring with damage to their cold hardy gardenias, azaleas, Indian hawthorn, and cast iron plants. Tallow trees had significant damage. 
 

my father lives in north Little Rock, and most of the windmills in his neighborhood survived (below 0). I saw sabals pushing growth in Hot Springs. I’ve seen some younger live oaks (under 10 years old) in Little Rock that seem fine. 

Edited by ShadowNight030
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Meangreen94z

Found a Phoenix Dactylifera that survived in Austin. All others that I previously was aware of perished.

00CC83A9-0611-4F4E-B452-377816E12934.jpeg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon

Update on west side and heading into town. Survival rate inside the black circle is halved while east of the blue line towards town remains about the same. The area in between is transitional. 

It almost feels like an entire USDA zone jump within 10 miles heading into town on I-10 imo.  610 around Uptown and Bellaire looks amazing and the heat island warmth is most apparent past 610 to about halfway to BW8. Many of the robusta in this area (the very skinny, lime green, super weepy tropical looking ones) are nearing a full recovery and look much better than some of the stragglers out west toward Katy Area. 

llalalaa.jpg.77469a782deb88fe221ede3f012f0d73.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms

I had about 6 big washingtonia ( hybrid, filifera thin and fat, come back but died over the summer. Also a tall Livistonia Chinese’s and Brahea Armata. Even my 35Ft tall Phoenix sylvestris started back but died within 6 weeks.

anyone else have this issue?

Edited by Collectorpalms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon
27 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

I had about 6 big washingtonia ( hybrid, filifera thin and fat, come back but died over the summer. Also a tall Livistonia Chinese’s and Brahea Armata. Even my 35Ft tall Phoenix sylvestris started back but died within 6 weeks.

anyone else have this issue?

Yes massive die off in Katy Area. Half or more of the robusta and chinensis that initially pushed are now dead. Nearly all of the Phoenix dactyfilera are dead despite initially throwing several leaves. 

Two 20 year old chinensis in the yard initially pushed. One is looking great and has several full sized leaves and the other rolled over 2 months ago and had tons of trunk bleeding. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...