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Palmageddon Aftermath Photo Thread

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Fusca

Here is an update with my trunk-cut palm recovery.  First, Livistona chinensis:

 

rsz_lchinensis.jpg

My smallest mule starting to show normal-looking fronds:

rsz_mule_may02.jpg

Butia odorata doing the same:

rsz_butia_may02.jpg

Chamaerops.  Trunk cut was done 2 weeks ago but it is just now starting to show movement.  Six of the suckers are already pushing new growth.  My unprotected solitary Chamaerops almost looks normal.  I just trimmed off the dead fronds.

rsz_chamaerops_may02.jpg

Edited by Fusca
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Collectorpalms
19 minutes ago, SLTX21 said:

Recently took a trip down to the RGV from Houston. Robustas/filibustas look burned damaged all the way down to Corpus, although most look like they'll survive.  

There was a HUGE difference going from Kingsville to Raymondsville. In the actual valley, pure Robusta and Sagos looked like nothing happened. What surprised me was how well the Royals are doing.  Almost all were coming back. What also surprised me was the queens looked burned (some weren't that bad), but are clearly coming back - they Royals didn't look that much worse. Also the Norfolk Island Pines and Cook Pines looked terrible - that surprised me with the clear Royal recovery.  Maybe Royals can be tried in Galveston? 

Royals were in Galveston, specifically only were remaining at Moody Gardens. They became massive.

RGV was lows 20s. Galveston was upper 10s, as was Corpus near the Bay.

Below were not the ultimate lows In some locations, just gives you an idea. 
Some areas saw the lowest on morning of 15th during the highest cold advection, areas under the heaviest snow saw the coldest morning on the 16th when the skies cleared and wind relaxed. 

D0C0E83C-92BE-4AA3-A7FE-3FE37B216EEC.png

FFA4BB77-7378-41D1-9CE9-C98D4A43851E.png

66F9CCAD-EB43-4D4E-A660-FE9FA8F391F2.png

Edited by Collectorpalms
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Fusca

And a couple of pics of recovering Chamaedorea radicalis.  So far 6 of 10 have shown significant new growth and are starting to look normal again.  Companion plants (variegated ginger, elephant ears) also coming back.  :)rsz_c_radicalis.thumb.jpg.0f05848ebfcb09854bed97cdfeed2a12.jpgrsz_cradicalis.thumb.jpg.22cd9b45cc2fcea65685de027f556d30.jpg

 

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SLTX21
10 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

Royals were in Galveston, specifically only were remaining at Moody Gardens. They became massive. 

I haven't been down to Galveston yet. The geography of that island may have protected it better than most places Corpus and north.  The "devastation" line seems to parallel 59 southward from Houston all the way to just north of Corpus.  In Sugar Land area, many skyduster robustas look like toast, but shorter ones seem to be faring better.  Filibustas doing much much better. 

Edited by SLTX21

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Xenon

Adonidia against a south facing wall in Port Isabel that might squeak by

received_146345794059447.thumb.jpeg.18b13fee97de1eff6a2428616932d039.jpeg

 

Jury is still out on the coconuts...we just need one to survive in order to build a monument 

received_1699427346920450.thumb.jpeg.248ab008b556201c004ff5a0477083c9.jpeg

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Xenon
1 hour ago, Collectorpalms said:

Royals were in Galveston, specifically only were remaining at Moody Gardens. They became massive.

There was at least one royal in a private garden. A few foxtail and triangle palms that squeaked by earlier freezes. I looked at some recent Galveston footage and even hardy stuff there looks a bit behind (vs Houston), growth will probably pick up with more heat. 

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boaterboat
5 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

They don’t grow pure Filifera in the Valley. I have seen what Adams Nursery puts out in the past.

at least they grow Texas Sabals. 

We will see, but appreciate the insight. Of the group I purchased and planted, only 4 are “filifera”, so we will see. Even if they are hybrids, which I’m sure you’re correct about as most are, I’m just going to hope they make it through the next freeze.
 

I’ve had great results with Adam’s Gardens in the past. 
 

The bottom line in Central Texas is this; zero palms have made it unscathed other than sabal minors.  Everything else has defoliated and many people are talking about cutting palms down prematurely. In my neighborhood, which I specifically chose to build a home in because of all the existing palms, everything is toast.  I want to see them replanted or given the proper chance to recover.  I’ve had countless neighbors encouraged by my replanting and they now want to either attempt to save theirs, or plant new palms if theirs are goners. My goal (other than to replenish my own garden) was to encourage others.  I don’t want to see people give up on palms.

My personal decision was to plant more (hope some make it; see attached), because I’m not going to be discouraged by a once in a 100 year event.
 

Butia Capiata from Adam’s Gardens which were moderately protected in the top two photos now pushing green. 
 

New Chinese Fan Palms and one new Sabal amongst several Chinese Fan Palms (two of four I think will definitely make it) in the last photo. 
 

Good luck to all and I hope everyone has palms that will continue to push green after all this!

Keep Positive!

EB931CE6-8790-47AE-956B-7F689EBE35B9.jpeg

38B8917F-FE26-4433-8D8D-F526421CA380.jpeg

168ACB53-B6B8-4432-9952-E76A11226A3C.jpeg

Edited by boaterboat
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boaterboat
4 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

They don’t grow pure Filifera in the Valley. I have seen what Adams Nursery puts out in the past.

at least they grow Texas Sabals. 

We will see, but appreciate the insight. Of the group I purchased and planted, only 4 are “filifera”, so we will see. Even if they are hybrids, which I’m sure you’re correct about as most are, I’m just going to hope they make it through the next freeze.
 

I’ve had great results with Adam’s Gardens in the past. 
 

The bottom line in Central Texas is this; zero palms have made it unscathed other than sandal minors.  Everything else has defoliated and many people are talking about cutting palms down prematurely. In my neighborhood, which I specifically chose to build a home in because of all the existing palms, everything is toast.  I want to see them replanted or given the proper chance to recover.  I’ve had countless neighbors encouraged by my replanting and they now want to either attempt to save theirs, or plant new palms if theirs are goners. My goal (other than to replenish my own garden) was to encourage others.  I don’t want to see people give up on palms.

My personal decision was to plant more (hope some make it; see attached), because I’m not going to be discouraged by a once in a 100 year event.
 

Butia Capiata from Adam’s Gardens which were moderately protected in the top two photos now pushing green. 
 

New Chinese Fan Palms and one new Sabal amongst several Chinese Fan Palms (two of four I think will definitely make it) in the last photo. 
 

Good luck to all and I hope everyone has palms that will continue to push green after all this!

Keep Positive!

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boaterboat
5 hours ago, MesquiteRetreat said:

Oh! Those were your photos earlier?! I’m green with envy. Your neighbors might think you are crazy, but I certainly don’t think that! And we do the same regarding photos...whenever we have a palm delivered, a large mesquite taken down, or any “big work” done, we take oodles of photos...always fun to see them later. I am not familiar with Adams Nursery, but will certainly check it out. Did they deliver? And did they actually plant them? Thanks for the tip!

It was quite a project but I’m finally wrapping it up!
 

Yep, I had to take plenty of photos because it was quite an undertaking!

They do not deliver, but they did arrange for a shipping company to deliver them.  I arranged for my crew to unload, and then had a crane company come out the next day to help plant them all with my crew.

It was a doozy, but I can’t imagine what it would have cost if I were to hire a company to do this turnkey!  
 

 

 

1EE4BA50-C1BF-46D6-A533-016B502FC71E.jpeg

Edited by boaterboat

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palmsOrl
45 minutes ago, Xenon said:

Adonidia against a south facing wall in Port Isabel that might squeak by

received_146345794059447.thumb.jpeg.18b13fee97de1eff6a2428616932d039.jpeg

 

Jury is still out on the coconuts...we just need one to survive in order to build a monument 

received_1699427346920450.thumb.jpeg.248ab008b556201c004ff5a0477083c9.jpeg

I'd say that Cocos is gone.  If a single survivor is found in the whole of Texas, I would vote for a monument!

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AnTonY
2 hours ago, SLTX21 said:

 

It's possible we may never see anything like this again in our lifetimes. This was a once in a generation all the stars align event 

The strong vortex was predicted, and the US Midwest East coast was supposed to be in the deep freeze and we'd get a cold snap and freeze, well within our zone rating, even with the strong vortex. This was an all the stars align event, with bad timing on ice, snow, cloudy days, clear nights, and uniquely set up high pressure zones on both sides sending the jet deep south.

I will plant based on the 2018 freeze event, which is about our zone minimum, not this freak event, that we may honestly never see again.  With climate change, when the stars do align again, it may be 5 degrees warmer, or possibly more due to urban heat island. 

With climate change, I read USDA is actually predicting half zone up for many of us in the next 20-30 years. 

Height patterns in the SW US are what ruin the Texas climate. When constant low pressure systems keep happening in that area, that leads to prolonged wet weather in Texas. In winter, with strong Arctic cold fronts, you have the wintry event that happened this past Feb, whereas the same patterns in later spring bring heavy rain events (i.e. Memorial Day 2015, the recent rain event in areas of Texas the past few days, etc).

Edited by AnTonY

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AnTonY

Overall, I've also learned that date palms seem quite hardier than I expected. I've always believed that washintonia robusta were hardier than CIDPs, for instance, because I've seen the former more often across Houston - but the opposite actually seems to be true, based on the recoveries documented throughout this thread.

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SLTX21
13 minutes ago, AnTonY said:

Overall, I've also learned that date palms seem quite hardier than I expected. I've always believed that washintonia robusta were hardier than CIDPs, for instance, because I've seen the former more often across Houston - but the opposite actually seems to be true, based on the recoveries documented throughout this thread.

Washingtonia robusta are cheap and grow fast in the Houston climate.  The cold snap was rare.  Robustas are Zone 8b palms.  They are normally hardy for Houston and should be fine in the future. 

For the RGV, I was surprised that Royals were hardier than expected and was also surprised that Norfolk Island Pines died or were severely disfigured to not be aesthetically pleasing even if they were to survive. 

Cocos probably dead.  

Has anyone tried to grow this in the RGV? Heard it looks like a coconut but should normally be hardy enough for that area - probably on par with Royals/Foxtails:

Beccariophoenix alfredii

Edited by SLTX21

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Xenon
52 minutes ago, AnTonY said:

Overall, I've also learned that date palms seem quite hardier than I expected. I've always believed that washintonia robusta were hardier than CIDPs, for instance, because I've seen the former more often across Houston - but the opposite actually seems to be true, based on the recoveries documented throughout this thread.

It has always been true, CIDP survived the 80s while robusta did not. Only reason you don't CIDP more often is because most inevitably die to lethal bronzing and large specimens are $$$

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PricklyPearSATC
11 hours ago, SLTX21 said:

Washingtonia robusta are cheap and grow fast in the Houston climate.  The cold snap was rare.  Robustas are Zone 8b palms.  They are normally hardy for Houston and should be fine in the future. 

For the RGV, I was surprised that Royals were hardier than expected and was also surprised that Norfolk Island Pines died or were severely disfigured to not be aesthetically pleasing even if they were to survive. 

Cocos probably dead.  

Has anyone tried to grow this in the RGV? Heard it looks like a coconut but should normally be hardy enough for that area - probably on par with Royals/Foxtails:

Beccariophoenix alfredii

Robusta is 9a, not 8b. 
They survived for years in South Central Texas due to luck and mild winters. 

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NBTX11
19 minutes ago, PricklyPearSATC said:

Robusta is 9a, not 8b. 
They survived for years in South Central Texas due to luck and mild winters. 

Robusta can survive 8b winters pretty easily. Usually 8a and below zaps them. But they can survive 17-19 in a hot climate like San Antonio quite frequently actually.  Now if you’re talking about what won’t damage them, then yes they need 20 or above (9a). 

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Paradise Found
30 minutes ago, PricklyPearSATC said:

Robusta is 9a, not 8b. 
They survived for years in South Central Texas due to luck and mild winters. 

In my book called  'Landscape Plants For Subtropical Climates' for Florida list Wash. Robusta hardy to 8b. It all depends on where your 8b is at. Subtropical 8b verse Cool 8b is a way to look at it.

Edited by Paradise Found

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NBTX11

Agree, Robusta can tolerate 8b in a hot subtropical climate. They go down fast in an 8a winter, though. 7b...toast. 

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Xerarch
15 hours ago, Xenon said:

It has always been true, CIDP survived the 80s while robusta did not. Only reason you don't CIDP more often is because most inevitably die to lethal bronzing and large specimens are $$$

Another thing worth mentioning about hardiness of CIDP vs W robusta,  though I would say CIDP can ultimately survive lower lows.   The washy is a better choice in climates where you can expect it to be damaged every year.  A washy can grow back so fast, and can afford to replace a lost canopy every year while a CIDP will just decline slowly until it dies if it gets damage on a regular basis.  This is why in 8b areas of the arid west you'll see quite a few robustas, even large ones, while CIDP's are a rare sight.

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Xerarch
18 hours ago, Xenon said:

Adonidia against a south facing wall in Port Isabel that might squeak by

received_146345794059447.thumb.jpeg.18b13fee97de1eff6a2428616932d039.jpeg

 

Jury is still out on the coconuts...we just need one to survive in order to build a monument 

 

Man that's hard to look at that Adonidia, basically that's nearly the most ideal spot it could be in whole state of Texas.  Port Isabel, south side of a building that is taller than the palm, and it still looks like trash.  Fingers crossed it will pull through, but dog gone..........

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Collectorpalms
On 5/2/2021 at 10:22 PM, boaterboat said:

It was quite a project but I’m finally wrapping it up!
 

Yep, I had to take plenty of photos because it was quite an undertaking!

They do not deliver, but they did arrange for a shipping company to deliver them.  I arranged for my crew to unload, and then had a crane company come out the next day to help plant them all with my crew.

It was a doozy, but I can’t imagine what it would have cost if I were to hire a company to do this turnkey!  
 

 

 

1EE4BA50-C1BF-46D6-A533-016B502FC71E.jpeg

I do like the idea of showing off new palms, hopefully giving neighbors incentive to replant to. 
I think you should start your own thread, as it gets lost around the other threads.

updates on recovery in your area of Austin and how your old and new palms do.

great info, it’s just gets lost in these longer threads.

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NBTX11

New Braunfels Phoenix Dactylifera recovering. 

0521BB3D-D57B-4830-B472-AA70BFD1A580.jpeg

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NBTX11

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Collectorpalms
56 minutes ago, NBTX11 said:

E8F185AE-0E6A-494D-87FE-779095F3708B.png

I’m the Dominion they had dozens, none had green as of last week on the ones on the entrance. Prior to this they were stunning.

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NBTX11
5 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

I’m the Dominion they had dozens, none had green as of last week on the ones on the entrance. Prior to this they were stunning.

New Braunfels is warmer than the Dominion area.  The elevation of that area is much higher.  New Braunfels is warmer than North and Northwest Bexar.

A lot of things have perked up just recently also.  I checked on this Phoenix a couple weeks ago and nothing.

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PricklyPearSATC
On 5/4/2021 at 7:04 PM, NBTX11 said:

New Braunfels is warmer than the Dominion area.  The elevation of that area is much higher.  New Braunfels is warmer than North and Northwest Bexar.

A lot of things have perked up just recently also.  I checked on this Phoenix a couple weeks ago and nothing.

A Phoenix (true date or sylvester)... Chuys 1604 and I10 is recovering. 

Have not been out to the Rim. 

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Fukuoka Scott
On 5/3/2021 at 2:07 PM, SLTX21 said:

to grow this in the RGV? Heard it looks like a coconut but should normally be hardy enough for that area - probably on par with Royals/Foxtails:

Beccariophoenix alfredii

I'm in a somewhat cool zone 9b in Japan, and from what I've read it's borderline in 9b, with severe damage or death at about 28F, but that was fairly small plants. The only rather sizable ones I've seen in the US are in south Florida and even those don't have much trunk. My hunch is they'd be OK in the RGV near a south facing wall, protected when temps go below 30 - get it big enough and it might have some resilience. It's still a pretty new palm in landscapes. I have two 2-year-old Beccario seedlings in pots that I don't know what to do with because I don't have a big enough and sunny enough spot in my garden to plant them. 

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HtownPalms
On 5/2/2021 at 5:37 PM, Collectorpalms said:

Freeport which is south of angelton  saw 15* on the coast. 

I don't know how cold it got in Angleton as my power was out and with 3 small kids I had bigger things to worry about than palm trees. All I know is that the picture I am posting is 1 of about 5 Pygmy Date Palms at a office building in downtown Angleton that are pushing out new growth. Other than being along a south facing wall they got no protection. As you can see in the background there are many dead Pygmy Date Palms but it still doesn't take away from the fact that there are some that did survive unprotected. 

Another palm that shouldn't have survived was the Queen Palm at my old house. I thought it was dead but right before I moved out I saw a small bit of green coming out of the crownshaft. I will try to get more pictures today and post them. 

20210503_113241.jpg

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HtownPalms
On 5/2/2021 at 5:27 PM, Xenon said:

Angleton is a bit further south (which made all of the difference in this freeze) and saw something closer to 17F so it does seem possible for established pygmy to survive in a protected spot, south facing wall, etc. Some old established pygmies in central Houston did survive 18-19F a few years back.

Not sure of Angletons temps. But everyone in Houston assures me we get colder than the city even though we're 10 miles from the coast. See my post above showing established Pygmy that survived with no protection. I will take more pictures to post. Either we have some tough palms or Angleton didn't get as cold as people think. 

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HtownPalms
On 5/2/2021 at 4:05 PM, Collectorpalms said:

Pygmy unprotected surviving 14*, Impossible. I guess it would have had to been closer to 23* somehow. 

Also, there are already donzens of new Pygmy plantings. 

Sorry, quoted you in the wrong post for my reply. These are definitely not new plantings. A picture pre freeze for reference. 

20191207_130355.jpg

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Xenon
7 hours ago, Fukuoka Scott said:

I'm in a somewhat cool zone 9b in Japan, and from what I've read it's borderline in 9b, with severe damage or death at about 28F, but that was fairly small plants. The only rather sizable ones I've seen in the US are in south Florida and even those don't have much trunk. My hunch is they'd be OK in the RGV near a south facing wall, protected when temps go below 30 - get it big enough and it might have some resilience. It's still a pretty new palm in landscapes. I have two 2-year-old Beccario seedlings in pots that I don't know what to do with because I don't have a big enough and sunny enough spot in my garden to plant them. 

 

On 3/6/2021 at 6:24 PM, oliver said:

Beccariophoenix alfredii and Medemia around both looking a little burnt but I think will make it20210306_150327.thumb.jpg.5ab09cbedf6d34166a3d27ec230144f2.jpg

20210306_150432.jpg

 

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Fukuoka Scott

Wow that’s great! And in the Houston area! Good sized specimen!

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Xenon
1 minute ago, Fukuoka Scott said:

Wow that’s great! And in the Houston area! Good sized specimen!

That one is growing in Brownsville. I don't think they are a viable landscape plant for most of Houston beyond being a curiosity in a very protected spot or microclimate. 

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Fukuoka Scott
9 minutes ago, Xenon said:

That one is growing in Brownsville. I don't think they are a viable landscape plant for most of Houston beyond being a curiosity in a very protected spot or microclimate. 

Ahhh that makes more sense! Was replying based on your profile location. Do you have a place in the RGV?

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Xenon
3 minutes ago, Fukuoka Scott said:

Ahhh that makes more sense! Was replying based on your profile location. Do you have a place in the RGV?

I quoted another member's post (not my palm). He has many rare palms in Brownsville. 

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NBTX11

San Antonio palm update May 6th. I went downtown and the great palm recovery is well underway. I was actually amazed at the recovery. The Robusta recovery rate is now around 50 percent inside Loop 410 and around 70 percent downtown and south of downtown along Hwy 90. And I’m not talking all hybrids either. Some super tall, pencil thin, old Robusta are recovering downtown. Could end up being 80 percent recovery before all is done. Sorry no photos, I was driving down freeway. But here is one photo of some Hybrids along Weidner. These aren’t even downtown, they are on the far northeast side, outside of Loop 410. The ones recovering downtown were taller and thinner than these. By far in some cases. 

540AF76D-9C3A-4D84-826D-0B244A1CF137.jpeg

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NBTX11

I do not think downtown SA dropped below 12 based on what I saw. 

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NBTX11

Random Robusta in Universal City TX (Northeast of San Antonio). 

6D36696C-983D-4F5C-A8A3-9F1F5349BC7A.png

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Collectorpalms
7 minutes ago, NBTX11 said:

Random Robusta in Universal City TX (Northeast of San Antonio). 

6D36696C-983D-4F5C-A8A3-9F1F5349BC7A.png

I recall bees doing a lot of the pollinating of Washingtonia. Just swarms of happy bees. It’s no wonder there are so many hybrids in your areas.
 

So far I see only 1 really classic old Robusta alive here.

Edited by Collectorpalms

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NBTX11
23 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

I recall bees doing a lot of the pollinating of Washingtonia. Just swarms of happy bees. It’s no wonder there are so many hybrids in your areas.
 

So far I see only 1 really classic old Robusta alive here.

Go downtown SA and southside of SA.  I forgot how tall some of the Robusta are there.  Some of them look LA-lite.  And some of those are recovering.

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