Jump to content
Palm Lord

Majesty Palms In Zone 7b

Recommended Posts

Palm Lord

I was wondering if anyone has a good success story with growing Majesty Palm Trees in Zone 7. I decided to find out here. I live in the Chaussee neighborhood on Cedar Point which is an Island 2 kilometers north of Sandusky, Ohio's Battery Park Marina. All the USDA hardiness zone maps online say it is 6b or 7a but when I look where they collect the data I see it comes from the mainland. When I look at the weather it gives me Sandusky weather which is colder during the winter and warmer during the summer. Cedar Point, being an island surrounded by water, is a little different than the mainland. So of course that is a little inaccurate. This summer, I met a man named Tom who says he has been recording the temperature on Cedar Point for over 40 years and it hasn't got below five. USDA hardiness zone is calculated and determined by taking the average minimum low temperature over the course of 30 years. If the average minimum low was 5 degrees Fahrenheit it would be 7b. But that was for lowest temperature ever recorded. That wasn't even the average! I decided to experiment by planting Majesty Palms and seeing how they do seems how all my neighbors have some. Almost all of them are okay but I have one majesty palm that had some problems. I am trying to revive it but I'm pretty sure it is going to die. As usual, the Majesty Palm leaves all died but new green Spears push out during the Spring. There are new green Spears coming out of many of my Majesty Palms but a lot of them are doing spear pull. Some of them lived though. That is enough to keep me going. I will continue experimenting with palm trees. But yes, I just wanted to know if anybody else has Majesty Palms in zone 7 or zone 8? Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm Lord

Here is a video of my Majesty Palm var "Cedar Point" staying green despite being in snow. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JLM

Majesty Palms are not good for Zone 7. Their fronds get damaged at the freezing mark, but their bud is hardy down to 22F. Anything 22F or below will probably be the end for your Majesty. They do best in Zone 10-11.
Majesty Palms are good indoor palms for Zone 7 though!

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Allen

Nice effort there but they won't live unprotected.   Your best bet is to plant in pots and bring in a garage during winter.  Every Lowes and Home Depot will have large ones for $20-$30nad you can plant them as a annual if you want.  Why don't you grow a few palms you can grow and maybe protect like minor, needle, Trachy?  The zone map I looked at shows you at zone 6a/6b.  I looked at Sandusky weather and it's super cold.

Edited by Allen
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben in Norcal
1 hour ago, JLM said:

Majesty Palms are not good for Zone 7. Their fronds get damaged at the freezing mark, but their bud is hardy down to 22F. Anything 22F or below will probably be the end for your Majesty. They do best in Zone 10-11.
Majesty Palms are good indoor palms for Zone 7 though!

Agree they are a no go for 7 - not even remotely good here. 

But fronds can take a pretty good freeze w/o damage.  I don't get very cold, but certainly unblemished with 12+ hours of freezing temps down to 29/30.  They laugh at that.  My guess is there will be no frond damage until you start getting below 25-26.  But that's a guess!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DAVEinMB

24f completely defoliated the majesty I'm trialing here. Very protected spot, pretty dense natural canopy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paradise Found

Palm Lord, don't let those green leaves fool you, once the temps go back to normal they will turn brown.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josue Diaz

I wasn't expecting a baby ravenea! I've got to say I'm surprised it's alive, but I agree with the rest of the group. Won't stand a chance below 28/29. I cottled one along in zone 9b in California for several years before a freeze damaged its trunk and eventually led to the spread of rot. I'm in a zone 9b/10a location now and even here they are not exactly long-term. They may thrive a few years, then a hard frost takes them out. Frost directly on the leaves will burn them also. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr.SamuraiSword
8 hours ago, JLM said:

Majesty Palms are not good for Zone 7. Their fronds get damaged at the freezing mark, but their bud is hardy down to 22F. Anything 22F or below will probably be the end for your Majesty. They do best in Zone 10-11.
Majesty Palms are good indoor palms for Zone 7 though!

49 minutes ago, Josue Diaz said:

I wasn't expecting a baby ravenea! I've got to say I'm surprised it's alive, but I agree with the rest of the group. Won't stand a chance below 28/29. I cottled one along in zone 9b in California for several years before a freeze damaged its trunk and eventually led to the spread of rot. I'm in a zone 9b/10a location now and even here they are not exactly long-term. They may thrive a few years, then a hard frost takes them out. Frost directly on the leaves will burn them also. 

Theres some in some 9a areas that have survived lows of 26 - 24, heres one of the most northern on the east coast in Saint Simons Georgia...  Saw a few bigger ones in Crystal River Fl, also zone 9a.

86969456_1497548427070016_2706812651933007872_o.thumb.jpg.bf897534e5f47bee1f9be9927840c262.jpg

Edited by Mr.SamuraiSword
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Cold-killed palms can take weeks, even months, to show they are dead. Ravenea rivularis is not coldhardy beyond z9b.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Josue Diaz
18 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Theres some in some 9a areas that have survived lows of 26 - 24, heres one of the most northern on the east coast in Saint Simons Georgia...  Saw a few bigger ones in Crystal River Fl, also zone 9a.

 

Yeah, mine looks like that and finally succumbed to rot from the damage on the trunk. The trunk on this one looks pretty heavily damaged - I'd suspect from cold. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EastCanadaTropicals

I don't think that's even a majesty palm seedling, they wouldn't open a fully pinnate frond at that size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr.SamuraiSword
On 2/5/2021 at 1:21 PM, Josue Diaz said:

Yeah, mine looks like that and finally succumbed to rot from the damage on the trunk. The trunk on this one looks pretty heavily damaged - I'd suspect from cold. 

Yeah, its been there over 10 years apparently, quite the survivor, reminds me of that old photo of that CIDP that lost a big chunk of trunk in the 89 freeze 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Topiary
      By Topiary
      Hi,
      First time posting, been reading the forum for almost a year and loving the community. 
       
      Found this palm on the side of the road - it was used to stage a house and discarded- it’s now inside, humidifier running as I have other tropical plants, and is raised up out of cat reach next to a North facing window due to space
      Apartment has 12’ high ceilings, I’ve also got large windows facing West and potentially a South facing window (if I move my tropics and succulents). 
       
      The fronds are browning quite severely and I’m slowly increasing my watering as I don’t want to shock it. It has a new frond coming up and it’s still growing well despite the ice cold temps the night I rescued it (-1 degrees C). 
       
      I don’t want to repot it - and have read up on the dangers, but is there a way to dump out the soil and replace is with a well draining tropical mix with orchid bark without disturbing the roots? 
       
      The soil isn’t holding any moisture, and drains slower than I’d like. It’s probably dirt cheap from a garden centre. 
       
      Please let me know what you guys see in this one, I know it’s essentially doomed because of the climate here but if I can get it to next summer I can use a friend’s greenhouse all summer. 
       
      Pictures are a couple weeks old, I drilled new holes into the pot for drainage, added a large mixing bowl inside the decorative pot to elevate the inner pot out of any water. 






    • ElaineB
      By ElaineB
      My cousin gave me her majesty palm because she couldn’t keep it happy. I wouldn’t have gotten one myself because I know they are difficult, but now here I am. I live in upstate NY, USA, so the climate isn’t great. Summers are good but that’s the only ideal season.
      I repotted the palm in semihydro/leca, and I pruned off a bunch of bad areas. I placed in between a West and an East facing window with a grow light on it, about 12 inches above it. I have a humidifier on it all day. And am about to do my fourth and last spidermite treatment (water, peppermint castile soap, and a little cooking oil.)
      it is growing new water roots, so it seems to be happy with the semihydro. It came with three new spikes, one of which is beginning to open. The other fronds are beginning to look dry however. I don’t think it is possible that it is getting too much light from the grow bulb as the area directly under that looks ok. Is this part of the normal cycle? Should I prune it back more, or would that be detrimental to the plant? Any advice or suggestions of other things I could do for it would be greatly appreciated. 
      Thanks!
      Elaine


    • donofriojim1
      By donofriojim1
      For this post, I want to highlight a wonderful Sabal Minor Mc Curtain specimen. This palm is not in Cincinnati. It is actually east of town in a southern Ohio town on the Ohio river. The grower of this palm has had this palm for a total of six years. It has never had any special protection of any kind. The first picture was taken after a snow in February, 2020. The second picture was taken early this month.  Happy palm growing!


    • donofriojim1
      By donofriojim1
      For my next post, I want to highlight some of the palms that I've come across in the Cincinnati suburbs outside of the ones in my yard. The first picture is of a windmill palm (trachycapus fortunei) on the eastern side of town. According to the grower, this specimen has endured three winters in the ground with minimal protective measures. His protection for this palm is only a heating cable around the trunk and a frost cloth. This picture was taken in late spring, 2019. It had completely defoliated during January,2019 when temps did drop below zero. The palm started to rebound very quickly. The second picture is the same palm this spring shared to me by the grower with the heating cable still on the trunk and a fully recovered crown.
       
      The next several pictures are from a grower just a stones' throw away from me in the northern Cincinnati suburbs. This grower has some truly wonderful exotics that most nursery staff would say are a waste of time and money in his yard that have proven to be as reliable as tulips simply from protection for wind, placing in the sunniest spots, and extra mulch. The first of these pictures from his yard is a rare true trachycarpus takil that he raised for seed. It has also been in the ground for three years and is only protected by being covered with a mound of straw, no added heat. The other pictures are winter time pictures of his needle palm and sabal minor, He unlike me, does take some protective measures. His protective measures are just covering the trunk of the plant with straw while leaving all leaves exposed. these needle palms and sabal minor have been in the ground since 2006 and laughed off the vortex years.





    • donofriojim1
      By donofriojim1
      In my previous post, I shared some pictures of some established needle palms that were planted at a Cincinnati restaurant in about 2009 that never get any special protection of any kind. Here are some pictures that were taken by another local palm enthusiast and shared with me. These pics show the needle palms during the freeze of January, 2019.



×
×
  • Create New...