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NOT A TA

Ravenala madagascariensis Travelers palm seed for sale

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NOT A TA

Although they're not actually a palm, I'd been trying to source Ravenala madagascariensis seeds for a long time and recently had the opportunity to collect some seed from some big mature trees. Unlike a lot of the other sources I collect seed from I probably won't be able to get more from these for two years or longer.  I have them listed on Ebay and my website at the links below. When they're gone they'll be gone for a while. They're not an easy germination from what I've read (never tried myself) and scarification techniques is probably the best method. Website and Ebay both securely take all the usual forms of online payment. Anyone still using the old school system of writing checks and sending in the mail can PM me. USA SHIPPING ONLY

If you're interested in other common S FL palm and other seeds my website is set up to easily combine shipping so it keeps your cost very low when buying small quantities of seed. You can buy a bunch of different types of seed and only spend $3.50-4.00 shipping. Ebay doesn't combine automatically but I go back through paypal later and refund for combined purchases. Lab-14 catalog pages 3-7 have palmy stuff.

10 seeds for $8.00 plus $3.50 shipping

https://lab-14.myshopify.com/products/z-z21-10-ravenala-madagascariensis-seeds-travellers-palm

Ebay https://www.ebay.com/itm/233838641393

50 seeds for $30.00 plus $4.00 shipping

https://lab-14.myshopify.com/products/copy-of-z-z22-10-ravenala-madagascariensis-seeds-travellers-palm

Ebay https://www.ebay.com/itm/265006928898

100 seeds for $50.00 plus $4.00 shipping

https://lab-14.myshopify.com/products/copy-of-copy-of-z-z22-50-ravenala-madagascariensis-seeds-travellers-palm

Ebay https://www.ebay.com/itm/265023817848

Other fresh seed collected the past couple weeks on the Lab-14 website and Ebay or will be on Ebay as soon as I get them listed.

Adonidia Merrillii Christmas palm

Veitchia arecina Montgomery palm

Chamaedorea cataractarum Cat palm

Sabal palmetto Cabbage palm

Zamia furfuracea cardboard palm

Roystonea regia Royal palm

Wodyetia bifurcata Foxtail palm

Caryota mitis Fishtail palm

Acoelorrhaphe wrightii Everglades palm

 

 

 

 

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Zach K

Thanks NOT A TA! I ordered some off eBay and they just arrived on a rainy February 1st in Portland, OR.

 

My plan to germinate is to submerge the seeds in water in a tin foil covered cup, on a heat pad at 85°F making sure to change the water every day, for 3 days.

As I reach the 3rd day, I will pack my ventilated seed trays (Ventilated Seed Tray) with moist organic seed starting soil.

After the 3 day soak....I'll take the seeds out of the cup, de-skin the blue "fluff" off the seeds, and place them in their own slots (I have enough trays to allow each seed its own slot).

I heard that nicking the seed with a knife helps? Can anyone confirm?

Lastly, I'll just have to be patient and wait, making sure to monitor the soil moisture. Last time I used this method I got germination within a month n half.

 

Please add any tips for faster germination!

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Bazza

That's pretty cool!  I have a mature tree behind my house and it has formed flowers but I never thought to look inside of one.

Sorry for the slight thread drift.

:shaka-2:

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NOT A TA
1 hour ago, Bazza said:

Sorry for the slight thread drift.

Happy to drift as it puts my "for sale" post up to the top of active threads which is good for sales! ahahaha

I don't know how big yours is but I've tried collecting from ones under 25-30 foot tall and been disappointed. It's a time consuming process. The flowers are solid like wood and slowly open as they dry out exposing the seeds.  The ones in the pics below have taken well over a month to slowly complete the drying process even though they already looked dry when removed and so every week I go through them with a pair of thin needle nose pliers to pick them out as a bird would. There's no way to pick them out with your fingers really.

@Silas_Sancona re-educated me on the blue "aril" in another thread when he wrote the quote below. I then remembered hearing the term in one of my classes some 40+ years ago in AG school. On the smaller trees the aril is present but very few if any seeds and the aril looks like some in the pics below where you see the blue aril with just little dots where a seed would form.

"Is what is called an "Aril"  ...a Fleshy covering that covers the part of/ entire seed of some plants to aid in being dispersed by Birds/ other animals..  The bright colors attract more attention. 
Did not realize these were bright Blue, cool..  Aril coverings that are Red or Orange are much more common in other things. "

20210109_135843.jpg?width=1920&height=10

20210108_163209.jpg?width=1920&height=10

20210108_171533.jpg?width=1920&height=10

 

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Silas_Sancona
2 hours ago, Zach K said:

Thanks NOT A TA! I ordered some off eBay and they just arrived on a rainy February 1st in Portland, OR.

 

My plan to germinate is to submerge the seeds in water in a tin foil covered cup, on a heat pad at 85°F making sure to change the water every day, for 3 days.

As I reach the 3rd day, I will pack my ventilated seed trays (Ventilated Seed Tray) with moist organic seed starting soil.

After the 3 day soak....I'll take the seeds out of the cup, de-skin the blue "fluff" off the seeds, and place them in their own slots (I have enough trays to allow each seed its own slot).

I heard that nicking the seed with a knife helps? Can anyone confirm?

Lastly, I'll just have to be patient and wait, making sure to monitor the soil moisture. Last time I used this method I got germination within a month n half.

 

Please add any tips for faster germination!

If the link works,  this may help w/ germinating these.. Think nicking the seed would work in place of chemical scarification.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263676911_Germination_of_Ravenala_madagascariensis_Strelitziaceae_seeds_submitted_to_chemical_scarification

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JohnAndSancho

Bump for a cool science lesson. 

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NOT A TA
2 hours ago, Zach K said:

Thanks NOT A TA! I ordered some off eBay and they just arrived on a rainy February 1st in Portland, OR.

Thank you for your purchase! I've been slowly building up a seed sales business the past couple years and most of the sales have been on Ebay. I'm going to continue expanding the variety of seeds I carry and hopefully dedicate an online store just to seed sales. During 2020 I sold about 50,000 seeds and I'm hoping to double that during 2021 and hit 100,000 seeds. While I've been selling small quantities to collector/backyard nursery types (many are members here) I've also been selling more and more larger quantity orders to commercial growers and some of them are also members here.

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Bazza
On 2/2/2021 at 9:29 PM, NOT A TA said:

Happy to drift as it puts my "for sale" post up to the top of active threads which is good for sales! ahahaha

I don't know how big yours is but I've tried collecting from ones under 25-30 foot tall and been disappointed. It's a time consuming process. The flowers are solid like wood and slowly open as they dry out exposing the seeds.  The ones in the pics below have taken well over a month to slowly complete the drying process even though they already looked dry when removed and so every week I go through them with a pair of thin needle nose pliers to pick them out as a bird would. There's no way to pick them out with your fingers really.

@Silas_Sancona re-educated me on the blue "aril" in another thread when he wrote the quote below. I then remembered hearing the term in one of my classes some 40+ years ago in AG school. On the smaller trees the aril is present but very few if any seeds and the aril looks like some in the pics below where you see the blue aril with just little dots where a seed would form.

"Is what is called an "Aril"  ...a Fleshy covering that covers the part of/ entire seed of some plants to aid in being dispersed by Birds/ other animals..  The bright colors attract more attention. 
Did not realize these were bright Blue, cool..  Aril coverings that are Red or Orange are much more common in other things. "

OK thanks for the info...and happy to bump your post back to the top....:lol:

But the REAL reason I'm posting is to mention I noticed today my tree has another big inflorescence. This tree has a clear trunk of about 12' so overall about 25' in height. Here's a pic I took today. I guess I will cut this off and poke around a little looking for the blue aril. Will post my findings. :shaka-2:

 

 

IMG_0774.thumb.JPG.a5a0a09314706ccc1ce92a017d819378.JPG

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NOT A TA
On 2/22/2021 at 10:32 PM, Bazza said:

I guess I will cut this off and poke around a little looking for the blue aril. Will post my findings.

Cut this down yet? Any seeds?

I collected the last of the seeds for this season a couple days ago and so have fresh seed available.

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Tjohnson

So far I’ve got about 10% germination from the 50 seeds I bought. I expect more in the coming weeks.

13159302-EE9E-4525-BFAC-DB2FEB338720.jpeg

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Tjohnson

Achieved almost 100% germination from this lot. They are coming along.

A46A97D1-4E66-4660-8F13-DCD56633DF4C.jpeg

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NOT A TA
5 hours ago, Tjohnson said:

Achieved almost 100% germination from this lot.

Excellent results! Can they survive in ground where you are?

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Tjohnson
16 hours ago, NOT A TA said:

Excellent results! Can they survive in ground where you are?

Yes, they aren’t the most popular plant around, but I’ve seen them planted at homes and hotels in San Diego. I’d suspect wind protection is the biggest requirement here, to keep the leaves from shredding. I have 1 potential planting spot left, every other unplanted area is too small. My yard is very densely planted. 

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