Jump to content
Swolte

Trachycarpus Taylor form

Recommended Posts

Swolte

I just ordered a Trachycarpus Fortunei "Taylor" from Plant Delights Nursery. They are listed for 7b but reports are that these palms can endure much lower (official low has been -8F, yes, that's minus...). 
https://www.plantdelights.com/products/trachycarpus-fortunei-taylor-windmill-palm

Does anyone here have experience with it?

Pic from a PDN FB post.

TaylorTr.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Allen

Nice looking palm but if you are in 8b why does cold tolerance matter.  It's my opinion that all fortunei are fairly similar in cold tolerance and the different low temps reported are due to various explainable reasons.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte
8 minutes ago, Allen said:

Nice looking palm but if you are in 8b why does cold tolerance matter. 

Freak events!

(and the collector's bug)

Edited by Swolte
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm D

Never heard of it, I think these names are more for celebrity than any usefulness....Even Bulgaria variant, its debatable if its any hardier than any other fortunei...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

PDN lists Trachycarpus fortunei 'Bulgaria' hardiness as 7b to 10b

But it lists Trachycarpus fortunei 'Wagnerius' as 7a to 9b.

What I do know is that PDN trials its plants at its botanical garden in NC to ascertain an estimate cold hardiness. And it often adds the proviso, "may be even cold hardier" to its descriptions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palm D
38 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

PDN lists Trachycarpus fortunei 'Bulgaria' hardiness as 7b to 10b

But it lists Trachycarpus fortunei 'Wagnerius' as 7a to 9b.

What I do know is that PDN trials its plants at its botanical garden in NC to ascertain an estimate cold hardiness. And it often adds the proviso, "may be even cold hardier" to its descriptions. 

I think its well know Wagnerianus is a touch less hardy than regular fortunei.....although it makes up for it in wind and snow weight resistance/tolerance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RaleighNC

Curiously, during our super cold event in 2018 (5 degrees F two nights in a row, and 8 days in which the temperature never went above freezing), I lost a T. fortunei "Taylor form", but I did not lose my "Bulgaria" nor my Waggie, all of which were similar in size, and non-trunking.  The Taylor form and Bulgaria were in nearly identical sites and the Waggie was in a much more exposed location. All were covered with plastic garbage cans. Though I would not make much of this; chance has a role in which plants are killed and which survive.

I have never heard that Waggies are less hardy than regular fortunei. I have always thought that Waggies are hardier, but I might have been influenced by PDN, where I purchased mine (I am lucky to live only a couple of miles away from them).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chester B
4 hours ago, PalmatierMeg said:

PDN lists Trachycarpus fortunei 'Bulgaria' hardiness as 7b to 10b

But it lists Trachycarpus fortunei 'Wagnerius' as 7a to 9b.

What I do know is that PDN trials its plants at its botanical garden in NC to ascertain an estimate cold hardiness. And it often adds the proviso, "may be even cold hardier" to its descriptions. 

Personally I think their cold hardiness ratings are a little optimistic in general.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

I would hesitate to place any Trachy in 9b much less 10b anywhere in the eastern US. Summer nights are not cool enough for their comfort. Very little in PDN's catalog is of interest to me - their stuff is almost totally temperate. That's great and to be expected for a nursery in NC but not much use to me in a near tropical climate. Oregon suits them very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
climate change virginia
39 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

I would hesitate to place any Trachy in 9b much less 10b anywhere in the eastern US. Summer nights are not cool enough for their comfort. Very little in PDN's catalog is of interest to me - their stuff is almost totally temperate. That's great and to be expected for a nursery in NC but not much use to me in a near tropical climate. Oregon suits them very well.

I have seen some trachys in sfl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte
On 1/19/2021 at 11:00 PM, Swolte said:

Freak events!

(and the collector's bug)

Haha, this aged well... 

Edited by Swolte
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Allen
2 hours ago, Swolte said:

Haha, this aged well... 

This event would have still killed a unprotected Trachy at your 6F probably with the duration.  But I bet a lot more will be planted now in TX!

Edited by Allen
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte

Agreed, more windmills in Texas!

At least it gives some hope since the seed was collected from a palm that reportedly endured -9F. Looks like they sold out, btw... hah! I did order one but I had scheduled the PDN shipment for March. I normally NEVER do that but I was so busy with other (work and garden) projects that I needed a forced planting break. Now I am glad I did that as that would have saved me having to move even more plants inside! I had also ordered the Sabal Bald Head variety which is reportedly hardier than the typical species (listed for 7b). A mature one may even have survived this event here, unprotected (5F). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DCA_Palm_Fan
On 1/20/2021 at 4:04 PM, climate change virginia said:

I have seen some trachys in sfl

They are used in 10A here in the Tampa Bay area, and I have seen them in Fort Lauderdale and Miami both.  Closer to zone 11A.   I will say the seem to look the best in zones 9B-8A. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms
7 hours ago, Swolte said:

Agreed, more windmills in Texas!

At least it gives some hope since the seed was collected from a palm that reportedly endured -9F. Looks like they sold out, btw... hah! I did order one but I had scheduled the PDN shipment for March. I normally NEVER do that but I was so busy with other (work and garden) projects that I needed a forced planting break. Now I am glad I did that as that would have saved me having to move even more plants inside! I had also ordered the Sabal Bald Head variety which is reportedly hardier than the typical species (listed for 7b). A mature one may even have survived this event here, unprotected (5F). 

Most Trachycarpus look bad in Texas unless you’re fortunate to have the right soil and Low sodium water. You may have better soil than me. It varies locally. I have 15ft of clay and my next door neighbor has sandy loam fill dirt. They can grow plants I can’t, But if you have watched Trachycarpus planted they eventually almost all die here. 
The first palms I landscaped with were Trachycarpus. As soon as I started watering them they went downhill. Even a Wagy at peckerwood gardens that has good soil and water succumbed to Texas even in shady understory. 
longest living Trachycarpus I know of is on the Riverwalk near a couple Braheas. I have no idea how that one lives. There are older ones in Houston, but it’s weather is more marine influenced, and neutral to acidic soil. There is near a ph of 6-7 while mine is 8.5 ( both soil and water). I collect rainwater but some spells there is not enough to go around. I can go through 100 gallons a day.

If Sabals live through this that might be a better idea, at least for me.

Edited by Collectorpalms
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
necturus

I can never figure out why some Trachycarpus survive and grow in Houston but others die. I tried two decent sized plants from HGC a few years ago and they promptly died planted in a shady area. It's worth noting they are widely sold by Houston Garden Center yet relatively few good specimens exist in the area. Probably exceptional genetics/conditions in those cases.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte
10 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

Most Trachycarpus look bad in Texas unless you’re fortunate to have the right soil and Low sodium water. You may have better soil than me. It varies locally. I have 15ft of clay and my next door neighbor has sandy loam fill dirt. They can grow plants I can’t, But if you have watched Trachycarpus planted they eventually almost all die here. 
The first palms I landscaped with were Trachycarpus. As soon as I started watering them they went downhill. Even a Wagy at peckerwood gardens that has good soil and water succumbed to Texas even in shady understory. 
longest living Trachycarpus I know of is on the Riverwalk near a couple Braheas. I have no idea how that one lives. There are older ones in Houston, but it’s weather is more marine influenced, and neutral to acidic soil. There is near a ph of 6-7 while mine is 8.5 ( both soil and water). I collect rainwater but some spells there is not enough to go around. I can go through 100 gallons a day.

If Sabals live through this that might be a better idea, at least for me

Here's my Fortunei last Saturday (bought at Lowes). I did mound it 6 inches or so with cheap commercial topsoil mixed in with the native sandy-loam soil. The latter runs at least 2/3 feet deep at that spot (the clay is closer to the surface in other areas). I have had it for 5 years and NEVER watered it, even during the hottest of summers. It has 3/4 feet of trunk and is sited in a shady spot under a canopy of post oaks. I actually feel it grows too fast as I like it smaller in the spot I had it. For those reasons I stopped fertilizing it for the past 3 years.

A friend of mine, a mile from here, has been growing palms for over 15 years there and has Trachys with over 6 feet of trunk (if not more, I'll have to take another look). They all look good too. I'll ask what soil prep, watering conditions (he's got a great setup for that), and fertilizer he uses on them (he did swear by a certain type) so we can try to narrow down the culprit. You're probably spot on about the water conditions and clay. Our Ph levels are the same.

I do hope mine survives this winter storm. I took a look yesterday and have never seen the leaves this battered. Other than the palms I deliberately left unprotected, I only stuffed leftover protection material on this one (hay and some plastic bags on top to prevent crown from getting wet). You (or anyone for that matter!) are welcome to drop by for further inspection anytime!

Trachy.jpg

Edited by Swolte
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NCFM
19 hours ago, Swolte said:

Agreed, more windmills in Texas!

At least it gives some hope since the seed was collected from a palm that reportedly endured -9F. Looks like they sold out, btw... hah! I did order one but I had scheduled the PDN shipment for March. I normally NEVER do that but I was so busy with other (work and garden) projects that I needed a forced planting break. Now I am glad I did that as that would have saved me having to move even more plants inside! I had also ordered the Sabal Bald Head variety which is reportedly hardier than the typical species (listed for 7b). A mature one may even have survived this event here, unprotected (5F). 

Bald head island varieties have survived 0 degree lows in central NC, so definitely worth a shot.  They generally have fatter trunks and are overall more robust and impressive than your typical palmetto.  Here's a specimen that survived the 100 year cold event back in 2018 (seven days below freezing) at Gary's Nursery in New Bern, NC:

bigBHIpalmetto.jpg.2ffc1fe2d2b69187df8145b409c71b84.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte

Wow, what a beast. That's the best pic I've seen of one!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chester B
4 hours ago, Swolte said:

Wow, what a beast. That's the best pic I've seen of one!

Agreed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Flow
On 1/20/2021 at 4:53 PM, Palm D said:

Never heard of it, I think these names are more for celebrity than any usefulness....Even Bulgaria variant, its debatable if its any hardier than any other fortunei...

100% agreed. Leaf damage on unprotected T. fortunei starts to occur at around -12C (depending on the duration of the freeze, of course). Anything else is wishful thinkin or marketing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vic

It's quite interesting reading this thread, I had assumed that Trachycarpus would do really well in Texas? They thrive is pretty much any soil here in the UK and in just aout every situation with the exception of areas that experience strong winds, so I will only assume that its the summer heat that troubles them there? I have to say I am a little sceptical when it comes to all these different names for the forms that have alleged super cold hardiness, I've not personally come across the 'Taylor' form so will assume this is a US strain? The 'Bulgaria' form is an interesting one, I'd never grow one on it's hardiness merits alone as it doesn't get cold enough here (US Z8b I think?) to test them, but to me it's an attractive looking variant of fortunei and I guess has some waggie blood in it due to its leaf shape and stiffness, so a worthwhile palm to grow regardless of hardiness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jimhardy

Yep

also

Taylor form has been around for quite a while.

My hardiest Trachys are the ones that have lived..lots of varience

even in the same seed batch....I believe the Bulgarian tracheas survived -20F so 

thats your hardiest one right there.;)....They are pretty,I had a small one in the yard

tough as nails.

 

ieVJ0wm.jpg?1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms
On 2/18/2021 at 10:20 AM, Swolte said:

Here's my Fortunei last Saturday (bought at Lowes). I did mound it 6 inches or so with cheap commercial topsoil mixed in with the native sandy-loam soil. The latter runs at least 2/3 feet deep at that spot (the clay is closer to the surface in other areas). I have had it for 5 years and NEVER watered it, even during the hottest of summers. It has 3/4 feet of trunk and is sited in a shady spot under a canopy of post oaks. I actually feel it grows too fast as I like it smaller in the spot I had it. For those reasons I stopped fertilizing it for the past 3 years.

A friend of mine, a mile from here, has been growing palms for over 15 years there and has Trachys with over 6 feet of trunk (if not more, I'll have to take another look). They all look good too. I'll ask what soil prep, watering conditions (he's got a great setup for that), and fertilizer he uses on them (he did swear by a certain type) so we can try to narrow down the culprit. You're probably spot on about the water conditions and clay. Our Ph levels are the same.

I do hope mine survives this winter storm. I took a look yesterday and have never seen the leaves this battered. Other than the palms I deliberately left unprotected, I only stuffed leftover protection material on this one (hay and some plastic bags on top to prevent crown from getting wet). You (or anyone for that matter!) are welcome to drop by for further inspection anytime!

Trachy.jpg

Was this windmill protected at all? How does it look now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte

Just went outside to take some pics with the headlight. 

First pic is how it was protected and what it looked like after the storm last Saturday. It was literally the last unprotected palm left and all frost cloth was used up. I just stuffed it with leftover hay and, to keep the center dry, I placed some old plastic bags (punched a small hole) in circles around the spear held in place by some clips (this worked as all the hay underneath was dry). As you can see in the second and third pic, the leaves are still green but it does look battered.  The 'inside' of the palms still looks fine. The main spear is firm with no sign of discoloring (see pic 4). So far, I am expecting a recovery!

Trachy2.jpg

Trachy 3.jpg

Trachy 4.jpg

Trachy 5.jpg

Edited by Swolte
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms
7 hours ago, Swolte said:

Just went outside to take some pics with the headlight. 

First pic is how it was protected and what it looked like after the storm last Saturday. It was literally the last unprotected palm left and all frost cloth was used up. I just stuffed it with leftover hay and, to keep the center dry, I placed some old plastic bags (punched a small hole) in circles around the spear held in place by some clips (this worked as all the hay underneath was dry). As you can see in the second and third pic, the leaves are still green but it does look battered.  The 'inside' of the palms still looks fine. The main spear is firm with no sign of discoloring (see pic 4). So far, I am expecting a recovery!

Trachy2.jpg

Trachy 3.jpg

Trachy 4.jpg

Trachy 5.jpg

Thanks. It gives me a mixed feeling for them. Mine would never have a crown that full in the first place. So to regrow it would likely be impossible and they may just go into decline. But your location looks good and gets my approval. There is was T Nanus on texas A&M Property that may still be there. I found it 15 years ago and was going to seed already. Curious if it lived neglected. Their fortunei around a fish pond got up to about 15 feet before they died of disease.

Edited by Collectorpalms
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas
On 2/18/2021 at 7:17 AM, Collectorpalms said:

Most Trachycarpus look bad in Texas unless you’re fortunate to have the right soil and Low sodium water. You may have better soil than me. It varies locally. I have 15ft of clay and my next door neighbor has sandy loam fill dirt. They can grow plants I can’t, But if you have watched Trachycarpus planted they eventually almost all die here. 
The first palms I landscaped with were Trachycarpus. As soon as I started watering them they went downhill. Even a Wagy at peckerwood gardens that has good soil and water succumbed to Texas even in shady understory. 
longest living Trachycarpus I know of is on the Riverwalk near a couple Braheas. I have no idea how that one lives. There are older ones in Houston, but it’s weather is more marine influenced, and neutral to acidic soil. There is near a ph of 6-7 while mine is 8.5 ( both soil and water). I collect rainwater but some spells there is not enough to go around. I can go through 100 gallons a day.

If Sabals live through this that might be a better idea, at least for me.

Soil in my garden is alkaline. Summers are hot during the day and night and Trachycarpus grows without any problem. 

They just need a lot of water. They love water. 

Edited by Cikas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms
5 minutes ago, Cikas said:

Soil in my garden is alkaline. Summers are hot during the day and night and Trachycarpus grow without any problem. 

They just need a lot of water. They love water. 

I have been to Croatia, for 4 years, and it is nothing like the Heat and Humidity of the Gulf Coast of Texas. Also in regards to lots of water, lets see your water report. sodium level, alkalinity?? Alkaline clay ( low oxygen) or rocky say like the Hill Country of TX... I know the answers already.

Edited by Collectorpalms
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas
Just now, Collectorpalms said:

I have been to Croatia, and its is nothing like the Heat and Humidity of the Gulf Coast of Texas.

Depends were you have been in Croatia and when. Summers here in Dubrovnik are very hot during the day and night. Night temperatures can go over 30C (86F). 

We have hot summer Mediterranean climate. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas
17 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

Also in regards to lots of water, lets see your water report. sodium level, alkalinity?? Alkaline clay ( low oxygen) or rocky say like the Hill Country of TX... I know the answers already.

Soil here in Dalmatia region of Croatia is rocky. Similar as in California for example or Greece, Italy, Spain ect... 

Soil is alkaline. Water is also very hard. 

We have various soil types, but most common soil type in Dalmatia region is clay and "Terra Rosa". 

Climate is hot summer Mediterranean (Csa).  Night temperatures during summer can go over 30C (86F).

Trachycarpus species grow here without any problem. They absolutely love water. They hate dry soil. They also hate sand soil. 

Trachycarpus species are native in Asia were soil is rocky and alkaline. They actually prefer alkaline soil. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms

Your Mediterranean is wonderful, But your does CLIMATE does not apply to College Station, Texas. Your WATER quality does not apply to College Station. Your SOIL type does not apply to here, except the Hill County. Your LATITUDE at 42 degree north does not apply to 30N.

This is a West coast vs Florida thing in the USA. You can grow a Trachy in Southern California, but not Southern Florida. Etc Jubaea etc..

Also, I dated someone for 4 years from Croatia, Y'all sound alike.

The perfect PH to grow Trachy commercially is not alkaline. Try acidic 5.5 and you will have beauties.

Edited by Collectorpalms
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas
1 minute ago, Collectorpalms said:

Your Mediterranean is wonderful, But your does CLIMATE does not apply to College Station, Texas. Your WATER quality does not apply to College Station. Your SOIL type does not apply to here, except the Hill County. Your LATITUDE at 42 degree north does not apply to 30N.

This is a West coast vs Florida thing in the USA.

Also, I dated someone for 4 years from Croatia, Y'all sound alike.

Europe is much, much warmer on same latitude than North America. 

This is how Dalmatia region soil looks like. crvenica.jpg

30C (86F) is 30C (86F) no matter is it in Europe or North America. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms

This is a flawed comment: 30C (86F) is 30C (86F) no matter is it in Europe or North America. Your forgetting that the dewpoint is a major factor here, we are not arid like a Mediterranean climate, with have very high dewpoints several months in a row, so that 86F at night is more like 100F.

Persistent Humid conditions result in root or crown rot and soil diseases in low oxygen soil.

 

PRELIMINARY LOCAL CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA (WS FORM: F-6)

                                          STATION:   DALLAS FORT WORTH
                                          MONTH:     JULY
                                          YEAR:      2011
                                          LATITUDE:   32 54 N                   
                                          LONGITUDE:  97  2 W                   

  TEMPERATURE IN F:       :PCPN:    SNOW:  WIND      :SUNSHINE: SKY     :PK WND 
================================================================================
1   2   3   4   5  6A  6B    7    8   9   10  11  12  13   14  15   16   17  18
                                     12Z  AVG MX 2MIN
DY MAX MIN AVG DEP HDD CDD  WTR  SNW DPTH SPD SPD DIR MIN PSBL S-S WX    SPD DR
================================================================================

 1  98  75  87   3   0  22 0.00  0.0    0  6.9 17 170   M    M   2 8      22 160
 2 101  76  89   5   0  24 0.00  0.0    0  4.9 12 140   M    M   2        17 210
 3 101  77  89   5   0  24 0.00  0.0    0  6.8 18 210   M    M   3        23 170
 4 100  78  89   5   0  24 0.00  0.0    0  8.0 15 210   M    M   4        17 200
 5 102  79  91   7   0  26 0.00  0.0    0  7.0 17 160   M    M   6        23 240
 6 102  77  90   6   0  25 0.00  0.0    0  8.1 18 160   M    M   3        22 150
 7 102  80  91   6   0  26 0.00  0.0    0  8.7 18 200   M    M   4        23 210
 8 105  83  94   9   0  29 0.00  0.0    0 10.1 18 170   M    M   6        23 170
 9 101  84  93   8   0  28    T  0.0    0 11.7 18 160   M    M   6        23 160
10 100  82  91   6   0  26 0.00  0.0    0 12.3 20 190   M    M   3        23 170
11 100  80  90   5   0  25 0.00  0.0    0 10.7 18 160   M    M   3        26 180
12 100  83  92   7   0  27 0.00  0.0    0 10.2 18 170   M    M   4        25 150
13 103  83  93   8   0  28 0.00  0.0    0 10.0 18 160   M    M   3        23 170
14 103  84  94   9   0  29 0.00  0.0    0 10.2 17 200   M    M   5        23 200
15 105  82  94   9   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  7.5 17 170   M    M   4        21 150
16 101  80  91   6   0  26 0.09  0.0    0  7.0 15  80   M    M   6        18  80
17 101  80  91   5   0  26 0.00  0.0    0  5.3 13  90   M    M   4         M  M 
18 101  82  92   6   0  27 0.00  0.0    0  5.8 14 100   M    M   5         M  M 
19 101  80  91   5   0  26 0.00  0.0    0  8.5 18 160   M    M   5        23 160
20 100  79  90   4   0  25 0.00  0.0    0  9.1 16 170   M    M   3        21 140
21 102  83  93   7   0  28 0.00  0.0    0 11.4 18 160   M    M   2        26 140
22 101  82  92   6   0  27 0.00  0.0    0 12.9 22 180   M    M   3        36 200
23 102  81  92   6   0  27 0.00  0.0    0 12.9 24 200   M    M   2        31 160
24 104  82  93   7   0  28 0.00  0.0    0 10.2 20 200   M    M   3        24 200
25 106  85  96  10   0  31 0.00  0.0    0  9.6 24 180   M    M   5        29 170
26 102  86  94   8   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  9.2 16 130   M    M   7        24 120
27 104  83  94   8   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  9.3 22 140   M    M   3        28 140
28 101  81  91   5   0  26 0.00  0.0    0  9.0 22 160   M    M   4        28 160
29 101  82  92   6   0  27 0.00  0.0    0 10.1 26 160   M    M   4        36 150
30 100  79  90   4   0  25 0.00  0.0    0 10.6 20 170   M    M   6        30 190
31 103  84  94   8   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  7.4 17 190   M    M   4        23 190

 

PRELIMINARY LOCAL CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA (WS FORM: F-6)

                                          STATION:   DALLAS FORT WORTH
                                          MONTH:     AUGUST
                                          YEAR:      2011
                                          LATITUDE:   32 54 N                   
                                          LONGITUDE:  97  2 W                   

  TEMPERATURE IN F:       :PCPN:    SNOW:  WIND      :SUNSHINE: SKY     :PK WND 
================================================================================
1   2   3   4   5  6A  6B    7    8   9   10  11  12  13   14  15   16   17  18
                                     12Z  AVG MX 2MIN
DY MAX MIN AVG DEP HDD CDD  WTR  SNW DPTH SPD SPD DIR MIN PSBL S-S WX    SPD DR
================================================================================

 1 107  82  95   9   0  30 0.00  0.0    0  6.6 14 160   M    M   2        20 260
 2 110  83  97  11   0  32 0.00  0.0    0  6.6 14 150   M    M   2        18 130
 3 109  86  98  12   0  33 0.00  0.0    0 10.0 17 170   M    M   2        23 220
 4 108  86  97  11   0  32 0.00  0.0    0  8.9 20 180   M    M   1        24 180
 5 107  83  95   9   0  30 0.00  0.0    0 10.2 18 160   M    M   M        22 160
 6 105  84  95   9   0  30 0.00  0.0    0 11.2 22 200   M    M   M        30 210
 7 104  85  95   9   0  30 0.00  0.0    0 11.2 17 150   M    M   M        22 180
 8 105  84  95   9   0  30 0.00  0.0    0 13.0 21 200   M    M   M        25 200
 9 107  84  96  10   0  31 0.00  0.0    0 12.3 25 190   M    M   M        32 190
10 104  83  94   8   0  29 0.00  0.0    0 12.8 22 200   M    M   M        26 150
11  97  83  90   4   0  25    T  0.0    0 11.5 31  10   M    M   M        43  10
12 103  81  92   6   0  27 0.00  0.0    0 10.2 20 260   M    M   M        26 160
13  89  75  82  -4   0  17 0.86  0.0    0  5.4 29 360   M    M   M 13     35 350
14  99  76  88   2   0  23 0.00  0.0    0  3.8 10  40   M    M   M        16  30
15 103  79  91   5   0  26 0.00  0.0    0  7.9 18 210   M    M   M        24 200
16 104  86  95   9   0  30 0.00  0.0    0 11.4 23 200   M    M   6        26 150
17 104  85  95   9   0  30 0.00  0.0    0  8.0 16 200   M    M   6        22 140
18 106  81  94   8   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  9.0 18 190   M    M   2        23 200
19 107  81  94   8   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  8.9 17 220   M    M   3        23 230
20 107  85  96  10   0  31 0.00  0.0    0  8.7 18 190   M    M   4        23 190
21 102  84  93   8   0  28 0.00  0.0    0  9.5 17 200   M    M   2        23 120
22 104  85  95  10   0  30 0.00  0.0    0  6.5 15 160   M    M   4        21 130
23 104  83  94   9   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  8.8 15 190   M    M   2        26 200
24 106  82  94   9   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  9.1 28 130   M    M   3        36 120
25 103  77  90   5   0  25 0.07  0.0    0  7.3 16 200   M    M   4 3      20 200
26 106  81  94  10   0  29 0.00  0.0    0  5.3 14 200   M    M   2        17 210
27 106  80  93   9   0  28 0.00  0.0    0  4.9 14 360   M    M   1        20  10
28 107  84  96  12   0  31 0.00  0.0    0  4.6 14 150   M    M   5        18  50
29 102  80  91   7   0  26 0.02  0.0    0 11.2 23 120   M    M   7        28 120
30 103  83  93   9   0  28 0.01  0.0    0 13.2 24 190   M    M   7 3      30 190
31 104  85  95  12   0  30 0.00  0.0    0 12.1 18 200   M    M   4        23 170

 

Edited by Collectorpalms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas
6 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

This is a flawed comment: 30C (86F) is 30C (86F) no matter is it in Europe or North America. Your forgetting that the dewpoint is a major factor here, we are not arid like a Mediterranean climate, with have very high dewpoints several months in a row, so that 86F at night is more like 100F.

When conditions are too humid, it may promote the growth of mold and bacteria that cause plants to die and crops to fail, as well as conditions like root or crown rot. Humid conditions also invite the presence of pests, such as fungus gnats, whose larva feed on plant roots and thrive in moist soil.

We have Trachycarpus that literaly grows partially in water stream. They absolutely love moist or even wet soil during summer. 

Here they look awful only on sandy soil and if not watered during summer. 

Also as you can see coastal parts of Dalmatia region are near Adriatic sea (which is part of Mediterranean sea). Summer heat is equel sea evaporation. Which in turn increase air humidity in coastal areas. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms

Running water creates oxygen which is good for plants! Washintonia Filifera grow along streams in the arid desert. But again... This does not apply to low oxygen stagnant alkaline compacted soil. Then try watering it with one of the highest city water sodium levels, known to mankind. You cant leach it out with this soil. You just kill it the more salt water you put on it. its a death cycle.

Edited by Collectorpalms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Will Simpson

I have 3 Taylor Form Trachys ( and a number of seedlings that are all Taylor Forms or half Taylor Forms )  . When I got them from PDN in  tiny pots they had spear pull for at least 4 years in the ground . Once they matured they outgrew spear pull completely and have survived 4F here in Winston-Salem . 

The Taylor form on the left  is a male  . The Trachy to its right is an unknown  female , and the small plant in the pot ,  in the picture below that ,   is  most likely half Taylor Form and half that unknown female .

The below those pictures are pictures  of a female Taylor Form with inflorescences and below that is a picture of a   small Trachy that is  from  that Taylor Form  female and probably a Taylor Form male from the backyard . 

 

DSC05079.thumb.JPG.5173f4deef0fce627377281b479aaafb.JPG DSC05106.thumb.JPG.cdaebb4ff531d01778aa73c032b048a0.JPGDSC05212.thumb.JPG.d94676cc5b0245edfe337f5d664280c7.JPGIMG_0060.thumb.JPG.c6a37fdd86eb803c856d29cacbedf1e2.JPG

Edited by Will Simpson
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swolte
5 hours ago, Will Simpson said:

When I got them from PDN in  tiny pots

Yes, spears on young trachy do tend to pull easily. How long ago did you get these? They look very happy!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas
12 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

Running water creates oxygen which is good for plants! Washintonia Filifera grow along streams in the arid desert. But again... This does not apply to low oxygen stagnant alkaline compacted soil. Then try watering it with one of the highest city water sodium levels, known to mankind. You cant leach it out with this soil. You just kill it the more salt water you put on it. its a death cycle.

Soil here is also very alkine and water is very hard. Because of the limestone rocks, which are everywere here. 

Trachycarpus species are native to areas with limestone rocks. They do not mind alkine/hard water or soil at all. 

Edited by Cikas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms
24 minutes ago, Cikas said:

Soil here is also very alkine and water is very hard. Because of the limestone rocks, which are everywere here. 

Trachycarpus species are native to areas with limestone rocks. They do not mind alkine/hard water or soil at all. 

Your set of conditions work for you. My set of conditions do not work for me. Why beat a dead horse.

Edited by Collectorpalms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas
4 minutes ago, Collectorpalms said:

Your set of conditions work for you. My set of conditions do not work for me. why beat a dead horse. 

My point is alkine soil, hard water (and moist/wet soil) and hot summer night temperatures are not reason why it does not work for you. 

Maybe you have some pathogen in soil or water. Or high Chlorine content in water. Chlorine is toxic for plants. 

Edited by Cikas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...