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Tracy

Sometimes we plant a clumping palm and for whatever reason only one stem survives.  In this case it was a Dypsis onilahensis which I kept in a pot forever and became root bound.  At one point it had 3 stems but two died before I finally got around to planting it in the ground after several years in the same 3 gallon pot.  It does make for a nice solitary palm for a small space though.  It's not the only clumper I've abused and ended up with just one trunk.  Anyone else guilty of my sin?

20210119-BH3I2265.jpg

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climate change virginia

that looks like the weeping willow of palms I like it

Edited by climate change virginia
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gtsteve

Does this old Cat count? After about 25yrs wind snapped off most of them, another one of my 'past it's prime' plants.

20210120_110341.thumb.jpg.5ae6401d8de59295a32257df8509697f.jpg

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SEPalm

Cool palms. I have a European fan palm that I bought as a single trunk specimen. It never did produce any off shoots. I went ahead and planted several more smaller already clumping Europeans around it. After planting I realized I liked the clumped look better. 

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realarch

Well Tracy, of all the sins one could commit, yours is way down on the list. At least the palm survived and looks pretty dang good!

I’ve neglected potted stuff, more than I’m willing to admit, and wouldn’t have been surprised to receive a call from Palm Protective Services. 

Tim

 

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PalmTreeDude

It looks pretty cool like that!

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joe_OC

Don't be surprised when it starts to put out suckers again.

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Tracy
48 minutes ago, joe_OC said:

Don't be surprised when it starts to put out suckers again.

After about 5 years in the ground now as a solo, I will be shocked if this D onilahensis puts out any new suckers.  Not that it couldn't happen.  I have a Dypsis pembana that was abused during our 2013/14 remodel year; painters thought the well around it was a great place to wash their brushes, followed by the tile workers using the depression around it to wash the grout off their tools.  It was a triple sucker when I planted it in 2010, but only one survived the paint and grout.  Today the one remaining D pembana trunk remains healthy but there is no indication that it will ever put out a sucker either. 

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Palm Tree Jim
27 minutes ago, Tracy said:

After about 5 years in the ground now as a solo, I will be shocked if this D onilahensis puts out any new suckers.  Not that it couldn't happen.  I have a Dypsis pembana that was abused during our 2013/14 remodel year; painters thought the well around it was a great place to wash their brushes, followed by the tile workers using the depression around it to wash the grout off their tools.  It was a triple sucker when I planted it in 2010, but only one survived the paint and grout.  Today the one remaining D pembana trunk remains healthy but there is no indication that it will ever put out a sucker either. 

I have had my fair share of contractors washing off tools and such into my garden. Years ago, I decided to let them it was not a good idea.....that I would charge them for clean up!

It's only happened once since then. Also, I show them all of my cameras recording them. :D

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joe_OC
2 hours ago, Tracy said:

After about 5 years in the ground now as a solo, I will be shocked if this D onilahensis puts out any new suckers.  Not that it couldn't happen.  I have a Dypsis pembana that was abused during our 2013/14 remodel year; painters thought the well around it was a great place to wash their brushes, followed by the tile workers using the depression around it to wash the grout off their tools.  It was a triple sucker when I planted it in 2010, but only one survived the paint and grout.  Today the one remaining D pembana trunk remains healthy but there is no indication that it will ever put out a sucker either. 

Weeping onilahensis take a while before they sucker.   My friend's just started suckering now, after like 7 years in the ground.

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Tracy
On 1/22/2021 at 6:21 PM, joe_OC said:

Weeping onilahensis take a while before they sucker.   My friend's just started suckering now, after like 7 years in the ground.

I guess the difference is that mine was clumping in the pot and then after leaving it in there the suckers died before I put this one in the ground. 

 

On 1/22/2021 at 3:45 PM, Tracy said:

I have a Dypsis pembana that was abused during our 2013/14 remodel year; painters thought the well around it was a great place to wash their brushes, followed by the tile workers using the depression around it to wash the grout off their tools.  It was a triple sucker when I planted it in 2010, but only one survived the paint and grout.  Today the one remaining D pembana trunk remains healthy but there is no indication that it will ever put out a sucker either. 

The now solitary Dypsis pembana is above and behind the Burretiokentia in photo below.

20210124-BH3I2420.jpg

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