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Manalto

Will My Cycas debaoensis Pull Through?

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Manalto

We got temperatures down into the upper twenties a couple of times recently. Also, the winds from hurricane Sally partially broke the fronds, hence the wire fence supporting it. (They stayed green for a couple of months afterwards.) Will it resprout? Any advice?

 

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Edited by Manalto

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Manalto

*crickets*

It's a goner, isn't it? And nobody wants to tell me.

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DAVEinMB

@Manalto i think I read that these will act like a perennial if the foliage gets fried because the growing point stays subterranean. I'll have to double check. Didn't think upper twenties would be cold enough to do that tho 

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krishnaraoji88

It will probably be fine. They keep their caudex subterranean and it keeps them warm. Make sure to mark where it is though. I had 3 go through like high teens and their leaves all were toast. I only lost one and its because I didn't mark where it was and I think it got trampled or planted on top of. The other two survive to this day. Their leaves seem to get hardier with age, or at least that has been my experience.

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Manalto

Thanks. I hope its caudex is at the right depth; I just planted it this spring. I didn't think upper 20s was cold enough to damage it either; it may have finally succumbed to the damage to the petioles.

My coal-mine canary is Philodendron hederaceum 'Brasil' you see in the background on the tree trunk. It's rated Zone 10 or 11 and doing fine. (I don't expect it to survive the winter without protection but it's an experiment to see if I can get it to grow large leaves - and I have plenty more indoors.)

Oh, it's properly marked. In fact, the whole bed is designed with this as its focal point. I was seduced by the online photos of C. debaoensis that were probably photoshopped to maximize the plumose effect. We'll see if it flushes in the spring.

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Merlyn

I planted a couple of slightly larger Debaoensis in the ground in December, they survived 28F with frost with no issues.  I'd guess the dead frond may have been from the earlier petiole damage?  I've read of these doing ok in the middle 20s with no damage, and low 20s at Broome's @cycadjungle with canopy.  Tom, any thoughts on damage/survival/protecting it for the rest of the winter?

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Keys6505
13 hours ago, Manalto said:

My coal-mine canary is Philodendron hederaceum 'Brasil' you see in the background on the tree trunk. It's rated Zone 10 or 11 and doing fine. (I don't expect it to survive the winter without protection but it's an experiment to see if I can get it to grow large leaves - and I have plenty more indoors.)

This is my second winter with Brasil in ground but the lowest it's seen is only 29.8 degrees in my 9a.  A lot of the newer growth lost its variegation over the summer and the leaves were 100% green.  I have it in 2 spots and neither one does exceptionally well for whatever reason despite how willing they are to grow as houseplants.  I did a lot of research on Philo's when I moved here but it doesn't seem that people zone push with them much.  I have the standard issue P. Bipinnatifidum but am also trying M. Adasonii and P. Subincusim which is one of the few I read about with rumored cold tolerance.  They're all under pretty dense canopy growing up an oak tree so the few frosts haven't touched them.  If all goes well this summer I plan on looking for a P. Evansii next which supposedly has some Bipinnatifidum in it's lineage and as a result is pretty tough by Philo standards.

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Manalto
1 hour ago, Keys6505 said:

This is my second winter with Brasil in ground but the lowest it's seen is only 29.8 degrees in my 9a.  A lot of the newer growth lost its variegation over the summer and the leaves were 100% green.  I have it in 2 spots and neither one does exceptionally well for whatever reason despite how willing they are to grow as houseplants.  I did a lot of research on Philo's when I moved here but it doesn't seem that people zone push with them much.  I have the standard issue P. Bipinnatifidum but am also trying M. Adasonii and P. Subincusim which is one of the few I read about with rumored cold tolerance.  They're all under pretty dense canopy growing up an oak tree so the few frosts haven't touched them.  If all goes well this summer I plan on looking for a P. Evansii next which supposedly has some Bipinnatifidum in it's lineage and as a result is pretty tough by Philo standards.

Is your Brasil in deep shade? I've seen that cause a loss of variegation. I would think it gets adequate rain in League City. Mine took off pretty quickly but it's stalled now in the cold.

P. bipinnatifidum is sold here everywhere.  I guess it occasionally gets knocked back in a harsher winter, but it's reliable enough to be commonplace. I like them all; I think they strike a nice tropical note in the landscape. When I was living in Zone  10-11, I saw how the leaves on some philodendron would get massive when climbing trees. It's particularly striking with the variegated forms. Someone here in town has one; whether it has wintered over or not I don't know. (Forgot what street it was on and now I can't find it - grrrr...)

 

8 hours ago, Merlyn said:

I planted a couple of slightly larger Debaoensis in the ground in December, they survived 28F with frost with no issues.  I'd guess the dead frond may have been from the earlier petiole damage?  I've read of these doing ok in the middle 20s with no damage, and low 20s at Broome's @cycadjungle with canopy.  Tom, any thoughts on damage/survival/protecting it for the rest of the winter?

Joseph from Texas Cold Hardy told me to add some soil over the caudex the last time I publicly fretted about this plant. I didn't want to overdo it but I may not have buried it enough. I'll add a little more soil and mound some pine straw (can you tell I've got a free source?) which a new flush can easily push through.

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krishnaraoji88

Just a note they do vary widely in their plumosity. My two from the same source have very different looking leaves

 

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Manalto
35 minutes ago, krishnaraoji88 said:

Just a note they do vary widely in their plumosity. 

 

 

At this point, I'd be happy with 'not dead.'

 Yours also seem to vary in growth habit, the one in the screen house appearing much more upright.  You've got a couple of beautiful specimens there, and have positioned them well.

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Swolte

My prediction would be that its not dead (yet) but that you'll see slow growth until the next winter knocks it down again. By year 3 you may wonder whether you should have planted it at all. If I could do it again, I would give it strong protection (anything close to freezing) and fertilize the hell out of it during the growing season until the caudex has really bulked up. I agree its a beautiful Cycad! 

The only Debaoensis I have left is a young-ish hybrid (with a more hardy cycad - too comfortable now to go check the tags now but let me know if you're curious) and I still get foliar damage in the high 20s.
:)

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amh

It'll probably be fine, Has the color changed any since you took the picture?

I think Swolte is right about next years growth rate, but from my limited experience, I've notice that Cycas debaoensis is a very fast grower. Almost taitungensis fast.

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Manalto
2 hours ago, amh said:

Has the color changed any since you took the picture?

No, but we're expecting temperatures in the high 20s again this weekend and there are even murmurings of snow. 

I've got a taitungensis hybrid (forgot the other parent) under the same oak. It's still green.

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amh
9 minutes ago, Manalto said:

No, but we're expecting temperatures in the high 20s again this weekend and there are even murmurings of snow. 

I've got a taitungensis hybrid (forgot the other parent) under the same oak. It's still green.

Add more mulch, leaves or straw and hope for the best, but everything should survive.

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krishnaraoji88
On 1/7/2021 at 5:19 AM, Manalto said:

At this point, I'd be happy with 'not dead.'

 Yours also seem to vary in growth habit, the one in the screen house appearing much more upright.  You've got a couple of beautiful specimens there, and have positioned them well.

I agree, and the upright form works out well around the pool where it gives clearance for walking. I had grown them both outdoors before transplanting this one to this spot.

I also agree about mulching heavily, just be careful not to let it rot.

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SailorBold

It will pull through the weeds... but I'd advise against it.

 

:)

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Manalto
4 hours ago, SailorBold said:

It will pull through the weeds... but I'd advise against it.

 

:)

Not sure what you mean by this.

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RaleighNC

It should be fine. I have grown a couple in the ground for several winters, and they have died back every winter and recovered each time. One that was in a very shady site did seem to be getting a little smaller each year, so this spring I potted it back up again.

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Manalto

Thanks, Bill. The fact that you're a full zone colder than me puts my mind at ease.  I didn't think I was zone-pushing when I planted it but my memory has a sly habit of substituting wishful thinking for facts. I'll have to revisit hardiness ratings for the debs. Yesterday I mounded some pinestraw over the caudex. It's fluffy so it should stay dry and I hope it will offer some winter protection this week because temperatures are predicted to dip into the high 20s.

 

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