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DAVEinMB

Does this look like Cordyline Australis? 

Surfside Beach, SC - Zone 8b

20201231_154340.jpg

20201231_154403.jpg

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Silas_Sancona
3 hours ago, DAVEinMB said:

Does this look like Cordyline Australis? 

Surfside Beach, SC - Zone 8b

20201231_154340.jpg

20201231_154403.jpg

Think so.. Looks good too.

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GDLWyverex

Looks a whole lot like mine with the only difference being that mine is purple. The folks from Down Under tell me that the purple one isn't seen in the wild there, only the green one like yours.

 

Richard

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necturus

Yup. Cordyline australis is pretty hardy.  There's tons of big specimens in the UK in zone 9A areas. The green ones are hardier than the red ones and other colors.

Curiously, you don't see a lot of big ones here, despite the fact they're fairly common in nurseries. I've always wondered if they aren't as hardy in humid southeast. 

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Matthew92

Nice plants. Underused in the US Southeast zone 8 areas from what I've seen.

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GDLWyverex
8 hours ago, necturus said:

Curiously, you don't see a lot of big ones here, despite the fact they're fairly common in nurseries. I've always wondered if they aren't as hardy in humid southeast. 

 I killed 3 of them before finding the magic spot in my garden. I have read that they do NOT like competition for the sunlight... Who knows... I have mine in a 150 Liter tub along with a Zamia erosa and a Euphorbia pulcherrima var winter rose. Since they all seem to be happy, I don't touch them as I really don't know why it's happy there and not in other locations which are not that different from where it is now. I've decided that it's temperamental and expensive to keep replacing

 

Richard

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PalmTreeDude

Do these handle hot summer temperatures well? That one looks like it is doing great. 

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Laaz

Yes they are, I had three I bought as spikes from Lowes. They grew to 12+ feet tall, but were all killed in the 2018 freeze.

cordy03.jpg

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DAVEinMB

Thanks for the confirmation everyone.

@Laaz what kind of growth rate did you see with yours?

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DAVEinMB
On 1/1/2021 at 5:56 PM, GDLWyverex said:

 I killed 3 of them before finding the magic spot in my garden. I have read that they do NOT like competition for the sunlight... Who knows... I have mine in a 150 Liter tub along with a Zamia erosa and a Euphorbia pulcherrima var winter rose. Since they all seem to be happy, I don't touch them as I really don't know why it's happy there and not in other locations which are not that different from where it is now. I've decided that it's temperamental and expensive to keep replacing

 

Richard

I have two sited in areas that are beginning to see less and less sun. I'm worried it's going to prove detrimental for them. On the upside they both have considerable canopy 

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, DAVEinMB said:

I have two sited in areas that are beginning to see less and less sun. I'm worried it's going to prove detrimental for them. On the upside they both have considerable canopy 

Spending a couple months where yours might get a bit less sun than the rest of the year should be fine.. Back in California,  7 out of 10 of the best looking specimens i'd see sat somewhere where they received some degree of daily shade where they're placed..   Planting somewhere that is constantly wet can be more of a problem, though older ones don't seem to mind a little extra moisture as much as smaller ones.. 

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Laaz

Dave, they were very fast growers but couldn't take the 16F...

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Matthew92
9 hours ago, Laaz said:

Dave, they were very fast growers but couldn't take the 16F...

Huh, I had thought they are fully zone 8b hardy. My grandparents have some in pots that have taken upper 8b temps just fine. I wonder if there is a fine line in hardiness within the 8b range. Or maybe there are regional variants that are more or less cold hardy than others?

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Laaz

I doubt it was just the 16F, but also the nasty freezing rain & then snow in the crown for like a week.

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DAVEinMB
12 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Spending a couple months where yours might get a bit less sun than the rest of the year should be fine.. Back in California,  7 out of 10 of the best looking specimens i'd see sat somewhere where they received some degree of daily shade where they're placed..   Planting somewhere that is constantly wet can be more of a problem, though older ones don't seem to mind a little extra moisture as much as smaller ones.. 

Excessive moisture definitely won't be a problem, I have a French drain system running all through the area where it's planted. The problem is it's beginning to get less light because of the larger trees planted around it. I'm not going to try moving it at this point so I guess we'll see how it goes. Trial and error and error and error and more trials lol

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Laaz

First it was the ice...

OLYMPUS-DIGITAL-CAMERA.jpg

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Laaz

And then the snow...

OLYMPUS-DIGITAL-CAMERA.jpg

 

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Laaz

And almost a week of freezing temps. The pure robusta on the left did not survive.

OLYMPUS-DIGITAL-CAMERA.jpg

 

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DAVEinMB

Damn Todd that's a shame, that was a beaut... both of them

Edited by DAVEinMB

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Laaz

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Laaz
2 minutes ago, DAVEinMB said:

Damn Todd that's a shame, that was a beaut... both of them

The one on the right is a filibusta & made a full recovery.

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DAVEinMB

I haven't had any luck finding filibusta here

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Laaz

I'll give you a couple seedlings when you stop by. This one flowers & drops seed everywhere.

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DAVEinMB

Right on man thanks!

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Matthew92

Ok I was wondering if those other factors may have contributed. Although I've seen in places like the UK where I've seen them grow they get very extended periods of cold/below freezing temps with snow. However, I know the cold there is more gradual and not as sudden (and sometimes as severe as the event you experienced) as we get in the Southeast. 

I have a couple in pots and one in ground (still quite small). Will continue to monitor how they do this winter. May be put to the test with a possible big cold event in mid/late January that looks to be on the horizon. I had experimented with various Red colored cordyline australis over the years here and they either croaked in the summer heat/sun or cold. However, I think I had the "red sensation" cultivar which from what I've read is less hardy than others. From what I researched, the "red star" variety is the one to get.

Still, I think your event in 2018 was quite rare and otherwise it's worth growing in 8b and underutilized. 

Edited by Matthew92

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DAVEinMB
7 minutes ago, Matthew92 said:

Still, I think your event in 2018 was quite rare and otherwise it's worth growing in 8b and underutilized. 

Completely agree. The fact that they got to 12' would suggest 2018 was an outlier winter

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Matthew92

This nice red and green Cordyline Australis planting near my neighborhood has been in ground for something like a couple years from what I recall. Not sure if it was there for January 2018 (18 deg F and a light sleet/freezing rain event). The other last two winters only got to around 25 degrees F. 

IMG_3605.thumb.JPG.c121ce15a08dabbd7fb94bf17e344d16.JPG

 

Edited by Matthew92
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Bazza

I have used C. australis on various projects including these I planted at my Mom's house on the side bed where I wanted something with a vertical growth habit as a stand alone and I think it really created an unusual design effect. This is the variety known as 'Dark Star'. These have been here for about 9 years.

Mom is going to be 98 years old next month, and is still living on her own. She's a WWII Navy vet. Bottom pic is Mom with a 7 gallon 'Mammy' Croton I bought that had reverted back to one of it's parents.

 

IMG_2702.thumb.JPG.336ced871aee10793cfa0d81cf0b24f7.JPG

 

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IMG_8872.thumb.JPG.3f723992afe71c0db24619b11fc46ee9.JPG

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Manalto

Looks really nice, Barry. I like the "grove" effect of varying heights; I like when it's done with trunking palms, too.

Mom is doing well - you've got some good genetics, my friend.

What is the botanical name of the ubiquitous "spike" that they sell in the garden centers for container arrangements of annuals? I think they're considered to be disposable at the end of the season in cold-winter climates, but when I was in Connecticut, I overwintered one in the house for a few years until I didn't have room for it and then gave it away to someone with a greenhouse. They're usually offered in red and green varieties.  Dracaena?

Edited by Manalto
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Bazza
9 hours ago, Manalto said:

Looks really nice, Barry. I like the "grove" effect of varying heights; I like when it's done with trunking palms, too.

Mom is doing well - you've got some good genetics, my friend.

What is the botanical name of the ubiquitous "spike" that they sell in the garden centers for container arrangements of annuals? I think they're considered to be disposable at the end of the season in cold-winter climates, but when I was in Connecticut, I overwintered one in the house for a few years until I didn't have room for it and then gave it away to someone with a greenhouse. They're usually offered in red and green varieties.  Dracaena?

Thank you Manalto - appreciate the compliments. Will pass along to Mom!

The ones I have seen referred to as "Spikes" are the Cordyline indivisa - and I've only seen them in green. The red ones could be another variety of C. australis such as 'Red Sensation' or 'Red Star".

I have some here I'm trying to grow into larger specimens for the yard somewhere. If you do a Google search - they get quite large and very jurrasic in form.

They are also referred to as Dracaenas but I think Cordyline is the correct genus.

Big game tonight...unless you're a War Eagle. ;)

 

 

 

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Chester B
2 hours ago, Bazza said:

The ones I have seen referred to as "Spikes" are the Cordyline indivisa

I don't know why they keep doing this.  Indivisa are pretty hard to find and have much larger strappier leaves.  This is a rare plant for collectors not a mass market item.

All the spikes, dracaenas whatever they want to call them are all Cordyline australis.  They come in a variety of colors aside from the standard green.  The most common varieties are the red star, cherry sensation, torbay dazzler and sundance.  Anecdotal evidence suggests the standard green form is slightly hardier.

This is a zone 9A long term plant.  They will survive colder, but in climates like mine (8B) they get knocked back every 5-10 years, so you can consider them root hardy but not stem hardy.  It isn't until you get out to the Ocean in zone 9A that you will see mature ones.

Cordyline australis - The University of Auckland

Edited by Chester B
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Bazza
12 minutes ago, Chester B said:

I don't know why they keep doing this.  Indivisa are pretty hard to find and have much larger strappier leaves.  This is a rare plant for collectors not a mass market item.

All the spikes, dracaenas whatever they want to call them are all Cordyline australis.  They come in a variety of colors aside from the standard green.  The most common varieties are the red star, cherry sensation, torbay dazzler and sundance.  Anecdotal evidence suggests the standard green form is slightly hardier.

This is a zone 9A long term plant.  They will survive colder, but in climates like mine (8B) they get knocked back every 5-10 years, so you can consider them root hardy but not stem hardy.  It isn't until you get out to the Ocean in zone 9A that you will see mature ones.

Cordyline australis - The University of Auckland

That explains why I'm looking at my "Spikes" and then Googling C. indivisa and licking my lips but also in the back of my mind wondering how my little plants are going to grow into those behemoths I'm seeing on the Internet! :P

So my "Spikes" are actually C. australis - the green variety.  I'm OK with that.

Thanks for the info, Chester!

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Chester B

No problem.  Usually when they get knocked back by cold they come back multi headed.

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Paradise Found
On 12/31/2020 at 12:53 PM, DAVEinMB said:

Does this look like Cordyline Australis? 

Surfside Beach, SC - Zone 8b

20201231_154340.jpg

20201231_154403.jpg

Nice looking Cordyline Australis, looks to be around 7'-8' tall; when the trunk get taller it will grow fatter making them even more hardy.  Fairly tall for the S.E. Nice!

Edited by Paradise Found
height
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Paradise Found
On 1/10/2021 at 2:09 PM, Bazza said:

I have used C. australis on various projects including these I planted at my Mom's house on the side bed where I wanted something with a vertical growth habit as a stand alone and I think it really created an unusual design effect. This is the variety known as 'Dark Star'. These have been here for about 9 years.

Mom is going to be 98 years old next month, and is still living on her own. She's a WWII Navy vet. Bottom pic is Mom with a 7 gallon 'Mammy' Croton I bought that had reverted back to one of it's parents.

 

IMG_2702.thumb.JPG.336ced871aee10793cfa0d81cf0b24f7.JPG

 

IMG_0724.thumb.JPG.9a3a6ce8ba2f38ac35cba90c5987815e.JPG

 

IMG_9768.thumb.JPG.b345acb3b8bfc81c5cf17c7901e4ef06.JPG

 

IMG_8872.thumb.JPG.3f723992afe71c0db24619b11fc46ee9.JPG

Bazza, nice tall cordylines, the leave have gotten shorter and thicker, which is a sport of 'red star' which like more subtropical climates but can grow in "warmer" z8 as long as the winter are not to wet.  It also looks a lot like C. baurii whick is also a little more tender and hates very wet winters. Both are good cordylines for subtropical climates.  Good Job! 

Edited by Paradise Found
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