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chocolatethunda

Euterpe Oleracea, Açai Palm, Germination

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chocolatethunda

Hi all,

I finally received seeds I ordered from rarepalmseeds.com here in Aruba (small island in the Dutch Caribbean).
I would very much appreciate some suggestions on methods for germinating and care after the germination. I will keep updating the thread as they grow for future references.

Below are the suggestions I'm most eager to learn about of the seed type (Euterpe Oleracea, Açai Palm)

  1. Soil Medium for germination? (perlite, peat moss, coco coir?)
  2. Soak in water? (how many days, fungicide bath?)
  3. Does the sinker/floater test apply to these seeds too?
  4. Heat mat?
  5. Depth of Pots and soul medium after germination?

 

IMG_1638.JPG

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NatureGirl

Like this....

all my seeds are moved inside on heating mat now that the weather is a bit cooler.

F5F0A968-4B9B-419D-817A-339C114ECF2D.jpeg

D005F1D8-50FC-482F-A1FE-B341CAFFEB7C.jpeg

7D9A1DA8-2A20-42F5-A91C-D35F7D54C5FE.jpeg

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chocolatethunda
3 minutes ago, NatureGirl said:

Like this....

all my seeds are moved inside on heating mat now that the weather is a bit cooler.

 

Thanks @NatureGirl, what is the medium you have them in? 

 

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NatureGirl

Spaghum moss. 

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Jan Jo

I'm a relative novice with germination, but this year I'm trying out several species.. 

I bought some Euterpe Edulis x Euterpe Oleracea seeds from RPS. I tried 3 in small pots in a tupperware tray on heating mats indoors, 3 in small pots outdoors on a south facing wall and 3 in a bag on a heating mat indoors. All covered to keep them dark. 

The first and only to germinate of the 9 seeds so far is one of the ones kept in a pot indoors... The medium is potting soil heavily ammended with perlite.. 

IMG_20201121_200956_copy_750x1000.jpg.3064208a8e4a2d44843123bc2925274e.jpg

Crossing my fingers it survives and the hybrid is more hardy than pure Oleracea which would be a waste of time in my climate... 

Good luck with yours, keep us updated! 

J

 

Edited by Jan Jo
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Jan Jo
On 11/19/2020 at 11:17 PM, NatureGirl said:

Spaghum moss. 

Is that always your medium of choice? I haven't really found a favourite yet, I tried coco coir but didn't like it as it didn't seem to hold moisture evenly throughout the bag.. 

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