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Zach K

Drive Thru - Brookings, OR

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Zach K

I recently had the pleasure of driving through Brookings, OR on my way back home to Portland and decided to snap a few pictures.

Please add some of your own if you also drove through! I unfortunately didn’t have all the time in the world so I didn’t get that many pictures. Hopefully I can go down and give it a thorough inspection.

Feel free to correct my labeling :) 

Enjoy!

 

C3F53E0C-1D92-45D4-A9AE-7754BA8D6123.thumb.jpeg.93b5c3c1e1c312add56e685ef5c89e18.jpeg

Yucca gigantea and CIDPEFCEB5C6-7B32-4735-903B-05A794C56078.thumb.jpeg.38f4539e952efac9d140b3bc749f7674.jpeg

Loquat Tree

53E23836-B715-4050-BB10-B8FEE915F0B6.thumb.jpeg.4ac0197fe32fa2ba2283ead2da5c402a.jpeg
 

Agave

B40C4486-A436-48B3-A62C-830DA5617C83.thumb.jpeg.687d562b8232bb61f8ba855ca51538ec.jpeg

Any idea what kind of this tree is??

8F4EE135-2B97-4665-929B-2DC7359BCBB5.thumb.jpeg.37ffa2a25971b98333cf9f0ef42af84c.jpeg

Little Pindo Palm and some Cannas in the front yard

17BB119C-7E4B-4950-8558-EC7DB4481D93.thumb.jpeg.264c981a0265f9959ca704e3064a9579.jpeg

Some basic Colocasia

3934A997-000E-4A9A-87DD-15A0BA80AAF4.thumb.jpeg.0b69ed2f512b8a5c97a3b56b2681bd76.jpeg

Sturdy looking Washingtonia 

49757DDB-6BDB-4A2B-B600-1D40AD6386AB.thumb.jpeg.fe55d5c2f71d2318d5b58814eb4f6baf.jpeg

Why do Trachy’s always look like this near the coast?? Also hello little Strelitzia reginae

85A9AC50-BDE6-4902-9282-173C074C6FCE.thumb.jpeg.91ff043f11aa74109ad784acb6c44bba.jpeg

Interesting way to prune a CIDP

 

Cant wait to go back and visit!

6C5BFCF5-FCC5-44CD-9D0E-85D4588BA693.jpeg

192D0D88-6C39-43F6-B9C6-7E37265359AF.jpeg

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climate change virginia

nice plants

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DAVEinMB

@Zach K I always enjoy seeing pics of the PNW, really cool place. Thanks for sharing! :shaka-2:

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Zach K

@DAVEinMB My pleasure! This has to be one of, if not THEE coolest B) place in the PNW for Hardy Tropicals.

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Chester B

I know there is even better stuff hidden away.  I have a post from when I went last year and the plants you have shown are pretty common around there.  I have been scoping out Real estate there for a while, but it may be too remote a spot. 

A little further up the coast in Gold Beach you'll see many of the same plants too.  Streetview there is pretty non existent so hard to see what's off the main drag if not there in person.  Recently this palmy house went up for sale in Gold Beach and this is the only Queen palm I've seen in Oregon, but I had a feeling they would grow well down there.

fa4e127835e11441cfd203a949db5269l-m3356767783od-w1024_h768.jpg

 

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Chester B

FYI - in case you didn't know there are many mature loquats sprinkled throughout SE and NE Portland, and tons of medium sized ones.  They do fruit here as well, although I don't think it's every year.

Here's a couple of home for sale in Brookings.

Treeferns, Washies, Trachys and Cordylines

6dec5d0dc2d2394293d2de9ffaaa38fal-m4021812241od-w1024_h768.jpg

 

Washies

2acbf8b65775f3d76973204b6d167fb8l-m0od-w1024_h768.jpg

 

Citrus do well in Brookings, I saw lots of trees there when I visited.

a62d1cb26afb256ff111a2267f184cb5l-m3225854082od-w1024_h768.jpga62d1cb26afb256ff111a2267f184cb5l-m3677661547od-w1024_h768.jpg

Edited by Chester B
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Zach K

I've also been looking at houses in Brookings and Gold Beach. That's pretty crazy that there's a queen that big in Oregon. Im not sure how its doing now but there was a queen growing up in Camas by Lacamas Lake a couple years ago. Id have to go check it out and see if its still even alive.

I've definitely seen a few loquats around town. The largest one I've seen around this area is in Woodburn, growing very tightly next to a grove of mature bananas. 

Thanks for the pictures! I think I remember seeing a post showing an archontophoenix potentially growing in Brookings?? Any truth to that?

 

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Collectorpalms

Trachycarpus are not very salt tolerant. I expect your seeing salt injury on the leaves - if it’s that close to coast. The more rain the better they look. There can be a lot of sodium in some city water, ours is so salty in combination with high ph and high ph clay soil it kills them by killing the roots. 

Edited by Collectorpalms
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Chester B
17 hours ago, Zach K said:

I think I remember seeing a post showing an archontophoenix potentially growing in Brookings?? Any truth to that?

I've not heard that, but they have such a unique climate it wouldn't surprise me.  I think Howea would do well there, plus a whole lot more.  Not a lot of nurseries that way so I would think mail order would be the way to go.

7 hours ago, Collectorpalms said:

Trachycarpus are not very salt tolerant. I expect your seeing salt injury on the leaves - if it’s that close to coast. The more rain the better they look. There can be a lot of sodium in some city water, ours is so salty in combination with high ph and high ph clay soil it kills them by killing the roots. 

I agree.  The ones close to the ocean don't look nearly as good as the ones you see around here.

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Josh20
On 11/19/2020 at 3:25 PM, Zach K said:

I've also been looking at houses in Brookings and Gold Beach. That's pretty crazy that there's a queen that big in Oregon. Im not sure how its doing now but there was a queen growing up in Camas by Lacamas Lake a couple years ago. Id have to go check it out and see if its still even alive.

I've definitely seen a few loquats around town. The largest one I've seen around this area is in Woodburn, growing very tightly next to a grove of mature bananas. 

Thanks for the pictures! I think I remember seeing a post showing an archontophoenix potentially growing in Brookings?? Any truth to that?

 

Do you know where the queen palm was near Lacamas Lake? I live right near Lacamas and I'd love to go check it out! There was a house that was for sale near Lacamas with a couple of queen palms in the backyard that I went to check out a few months ago and they were doing pretty well last I checked. They looked to be around maybe 15 to 20 feet tall (probably imported from California though). Here's a youtube video that the realtor posted of the house: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-wTHFermUk&feature=youtu.be

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Zach K
On 11/24/2020 at 12:41 PM, Josh20 said:

Do you know where the queen palm was near Lacamas Lake? I live right near Lacamas and I'd love to go check it out! There was a house that was for sale near Lacamas with a couple of queen palms in the backyard that I went to check out a few months ago and they were doing pretty well last I checked. They looked to be around maybe 15 to 20 feet tall (probably imported from California though). Here's a youtube video that the realtor posted of the house: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-wTHFermUk&feature=youtu.be

Yup thats the house! I remember asking the real estate agent where the queen came from and it was indeed imported from Cali. I have not been back there in a while, I think I have to go pay it a visit (though it is in a gated community I believe). Pretty amazing if they are able to keep those queens and cycads alive.

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Zach K
On 11/20/2020 at 9:16 AM, Chester B said:

I've not heard that, but they have such a unique climate it wouldn't surprise me.  I think Howea would do well there, plus a whole lot more.  Not a lot of nurseries that way so I would think mail order would be the way to go.

I agree.  The ones close to the ocean don't look nearly as good as the ones you see around here.

Is there anyone on PT from the Brookings area? I would love to see a Howea grow in there.

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Chester B
10 hours ago, Zach K said:

Yup thats the house! I remember asking the real estate agent where the queen came from and it was indeed imported from Cali. I have not been back there in a while, I think I have to go pay it a visit (though it is in a gated community I believe). Pretty amazing if they are able to keep those queens and cycads alive.

For sure those queens are toast, Camas is far too exposed to the gorge winds and the cold ripping through there in winter.  Take a look at how much colder Troutdale is then the rest of the metro area, and its right across the river.

Portions of inner SE Portland is a zone 9 and probably right along the river in Milwaukie too, so that would probably be the best place to give a queen a shot.  Cycas revoluta I'm told by the local palm nursery does well in Milwaukie close to the Willamette.  I do know of a large unprotected one in Johnson City that I drive by regularly.   I've seen this one for a few years so I know it's a survivor.  I'm sure the palms help protect it from frost and more importantly our winter moisture.

https://goo.gl/maps/r3mgDr9f9oqfuZWz7

 

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PalmTreeDude

Nice plants they have there! Brookings has such a nice climate for a lot of palms. I have also heard of king palms growing in Brookings, and thought I saw an old picture posted here once? But I don’t know anymore than that.  

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Zach K
On 12/1/2020 at 9:24 AM, Chester B said:

For sure those queens are toast, Camas is far too exposed to the gorge winds and the cold ripping through there in winter.  Take a look at how much colder Troutdale is then the rest of the metro area, and its right across the river.

Portions of inner SE Portland is a zone 9 and probably right along the river in Milwaukie too, so that would probably be the best place to give a queen a shot.  Cycas revoluta I'm told by the local palm nursery does well in Milwaukie close to the Willamette.  I do know of a large unprotected one in Johnson City that I drive by regularly.   I've seen this one for a few years so I know it's a survivor.  I'm sure the palms help protect it from frost and more importantly our winter moisture.

https://goo.gl/maps/r3mgDr9f9oqfuZWz7

 

Yea I'd have to agree with you there. Granted we did have a mild winter last year, I'm still willing to bet the queen is probably gone by now. 

That's pretty cool that we have z9 areas in SE Portland in general, people should start experimenting more. Also that is an impressive looking Sago! Thanks for the link, I think I'll go take a drive and check it out. Milwaukie might be the move here pretty soon if I want to give growing those a shot :) I've seen a few Large Cycas revoluta growing in Woodburn too and they're going strong! 

I've also noticed a trend in Gresham and the East side in general with people planting bananas a lot more. Interesting considering we get the brunt of the East winds. Check out the link.

Gresham Bananas/ Curved trunk Trachy

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Chester B
3 hours ago, Zach K said:

Yea I'd have to agree with you there. Granted we did have a mild winter last year, I'm still willing to bet the queen is probably gone by now. 

That's pretty cool that we have z9 areas in SE Portland in general, people should start experimenting more. Also that is an impressive looking Sago! Thanks for the link, I think I'll go take a drive and check it out. Milwaukie might be the move here pretty soon if I want to give growing those a shot :) I've seen a few Large Cycas revoluta growing in Woodburn too and they're going strong! 

I've also noticed a trend in Gresham and the East side in general with people planting bananas a lot more. Interesting considering we get the brunt of the East winds. Check out the link.

Gresham Bananas/ Curved trunk Trachy

Bananas are every where these days around here.

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EastCanadaTropicals
On 11/19/2020 at 4:24 PM, Chester B said:

I know there is even better stuff hidden away.  I have a post from when I went last year and the plants you have shown are pretty common around there.  I have been scoping out Real estate there for a while, but it may be too remote a spot. 

A little further up the coast in Gold Beach you'll see many of the same plants too.  Streetview there is pretty non existent so hard to see what's off the main drag if not there in person.  Recently this palmy house went up for sale in Gold Beach and this is the only Queen palm I've seen in Oregon, but I had a feeling they would grow well down there.

fa4e127835e11441cfd203a949db5269l-m3356767783od-w1024_h768.jpg

 

Do they grow palms in Bandon because its also zone 9b there. North Bend and Coos Bay is also around 9a/9b.

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Chester B
7 minutes ago, EastCanadaTropicals said:

Do they grow palms in Bandon because its also zone 9b there. North Bend and Coos Bay is also around 9a/9b

Anywhere in Oregon west of the Cascade mountains you can grow palms.  It's down in places like Gold Beach and Brookings that you are not only limited to cold hardy varieties.

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EastCanadaTropicals
Just now, Chester B said:

Anywhere in Oregon west of the Cascade mountains you can grow palms.  It's down in places like Gold Beach and Brookings that you are not only limited to cold hardy varieties.

I still don't know why they don't grow palms in Bandon too its near the ocean and near gold beach. 

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Chester B
1 hour ago, EastCanadaTropicals said:

I still don't know why they don't grow palms in Bandon too its near the ocean and near gold beach. 

They do - lots of them there

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EastCanadaTropicals
1 hour ago, Chester B said:

They do - lots of them there

I didn't see any in Google street view. Show me some pics of washy there if you can find any.

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Chester B

Google street view through the coast towns is pretty limited to the Coast highway.  The older neighborhoods are where you see big palms and cordylines.

I remember Washingtonia and CIDP in Gold Beach as I stayed there.  I don't think I took any pics in Bandon.

Edited by Chester B
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EastCanadaTropicals
On 12/1/2020 at 2:12 AM, Zach K said:

Is there anyone on PT from the Brookings area? I would love to see a Howea grow in there.

Yeah.

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EastCanadaTropicals
5 minutes ago, Zach K said:

@EastCanadaTropicals Do you live there currently? Have you seen any other Tropicals growing there?

No, but I saw some Palmtalk members from there in another Brookings forum.

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EastCanadaTropicals
5 minutes ago, Zach K said:

@EastCanadaTropicals Do you live there currently? Have you seen any other Tropicals growing there?

I live in 5a/5b Canada.

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NBTX11

How about Medford, OR.  Wouldn't Washingtonia Filifera work there?  I looked at their climate and it looks pretty mild.

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Chester B
53 minutes ago, NBTX11 said:

How about Medford, OR.  Wouldn't Washingtonia Filifera work there?  I looked at their climate and it looks pretty mild.

Yes I think so,  Very dry and hot down there.  I don't remember seeing any but I was basically passing through.

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EastCanadaTropicals

There are many decent size Cidp and Washys in Brookings, but you don't see truly large sized palms till Eureka, Califronia. Here are photos from there:

Screenshot_20210220-161753.jpg

Screenshot_20210220-161112.jpg

Screenshot_20210220-160636.jpg

 

 

Screenshot_20210220-161418.jpg

Edited by EastCanadaTropicals
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EastCanadaTropicals

Also a Queen in brookings:

Screenshot_20210220-163926.jpgWith a curved trunk at that!

Edited by EastCanadaTropicals
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EastCanadaTropicals

A W.Filifera and some agaves:

Screenshot_20210220-174341.jpg

Screenshot_20210220-173912.jpg

Screenshot_20210220-174112.jpg

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EastCanadaTropicals

Most likely a Trachy but could be a W.Robusta: 

Screenshot_20210220-174151.jpg

Screenshot_20210220-174204.jpgI would be impressed if that was a washy.

Edited by EastCanadaTropicals
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Paradise Found

I've heard that Brookings has nice warm ups in January into the 70's and sometimes 80's.  Bird of paradise has to grow there. 

Here is the mother load of Brookings palms and exotics!!!

http://www.hookedonpalms.com/medfordsooregonareas/palmsincurrycounty.html

Edited by Paradise Found
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EastCanadaTropicals
Just now, Paradise Found said:

I've heard that Brookings has nice warm ups in January into the 70's and sometimes 80's.  Bird of paradise has to grow there. 

Maybe a better choice down in Eureka, the overall climate is milder there.

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Paradise Found
6 minutes ago, EastCanadaTropicals said:

Maybe a better choice down in Eureka, the overall climate is milder there.

Check out my post again and look at the website I posted, lots of exotic palms. Queens, shaving brush, jubaea, etc.  I'm not to sure Eureka is warmer.

Edited by Paradise Found
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EastCanadaTropicals
1 minute ago, Paradise Found said:

Check out my post again and look at the website I posted, lots of exotic palms. Queens, shaving brush, jubaea, etc. 

Ok thanks

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EastCanadaTropicals
11 minutes ago, Paradise Found said:

I've heard that Brookings has nice warm ups in January into the 70's and sometimes 80's.  Bird of paradise has to grow there. 

Here is the mother load of Brookings palms and exotics!!!

http://www.hookedonpalms.com/medfordsooregonareas/palmsincurrycounty.html

I think I found the washy i saw on street view:

Both images are a match! Thanks.

594_Mexican_Fan_palm_just_above_Down_Town_Brookings_OR.jpeg

Screenshot_20210220-174151.jpg

Edited by EastCanadaTropicals
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EastCanadaTropicals

Yet another washy:

ce41605434e5a5fce73a8da353d54263l-m2646626247xd-w1020_h770_q80.jpg

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Paradise Found

Chester posted this weather warm up in Brookings a while back.  They do have those odd warm ups from time to time. 

image.png.fb4a912663f4eb78d6970f2035129b3f.png

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