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LouisvillePalmer

Evergreen Tropical Looking Plants for Zone 6b

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LouisvillePalmer

Getting inspiration from this thread.

 

All I know right now would be the following:

Evergreen:

- Needle Palm

- Sabal Minor

- Yucca Rostrata

- Bamboo Leaf Oak Tree

- Magnolia

Non-Evergreen:

- Hardy Banana Tree

- Elephant Ears

 

Anyone have any other ideas?

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Keys6505

Have you ever checked out Brian's Botanicals?  I believe he's in Louisville as well.  He usually has a lot of different stuff.

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ColdBonsai

Acuba japonica - Gold Dust is a favorite of mine (hardy in zone 6 or 7 depending on the website you read)

Can't go wrong with evergreen ferns either. Three of my favorites:

Cytomium fortunei - Hardy japanese holly fern

Polysticum munitum - Western Sword Fern

Asplenium scolopendrium - Hart's Tongue Fern

And some kinds of rhodendron have a nice tropical look as well. Gomer Waterer is a favorite for me with big deep green leaves.

Edited by ColdBonsai
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newtopalmsMD

Evergreen: Bright edge yucca, color guard yucca are non-trunking yuccas, with flat long leaves. Texas Red Yucca  (Hesperaloe parviflora) with thin cylindrical "leaves."  I grow these thee in 7a with no winter protection at all.   Agave Harvardiana will withstand zone 5 temperature, but may have trouble in wet winters.  I've heard of these being left in the ground during winter in the east coast with a dome over them to keep them dry.  prefer very sandy or rocky soil. 

Perennials:  Lord Baltimore Hibiscus (red flowers) and Lady Baltimore Hibiscus (pink flowers).  For small filler you might try sedum. 

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LouisvillePalmer
13 hours ago, Keys6505 said:

Have you ever checked out Brian's Botanicals?  I believe he's in Louisville as well.  He usually has a lot of different stuff.

I actually did briefly meet him a couple weeks ago. His father runs Berl Williams Landscaping which both businesses are on the same property. They had some really neat stuff there and that's where I learned about the trunking Yucca Rostrata, which is truly a beautiful plant when it gets to maturity over 10 feet tall.

 

I didn't get to see everything they have but I plan on going over there mid-January to see what all is alive and what all is dead. They both seemed very involved in tropicals and have been doing it for a long time now so that might be my local go-to source for information.

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donofriojim1

Agave paaryi "flagstaff form" and agave havardiana "glass mountain form", hardy cacti, Aucuba, hardy camellia, sacred lily "rohdea japonica" , sabal minor "mc curtain". I have all of these in my garden just a hop away from you in Cincinnati.

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Allen

My backyard is year round tropical in 7A now.  Potted bamboo helps me a lot.  All these bamboo are potted.  Bissetii / Dwarf Bissetii and Spectabilis are the ones I use.  I use garden trickery to hide the planters.  Sabal Minor and Needle should be your go to.  You can also plant Christmas ferns as ground cover.  I would plant some Trachy and cover them in winter too if you have the inclination.

Video below is my winter look in 7A but Trachy and the Mule will get covered if it needs it.  All evergreen in the video except the Jap maple and the planted out Majesty palms in the beginning.

IMG_3445.thumb.JPG.5387d5daa50215b26be90368d7edc306.JPG

 

 

 

IMG_1849.JPG

IMG_3696.JPG

Edited by Allen
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EastCanadaTropicals

Crape Myrtles with a little help can work

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LouisvillePalmer
On 12/6/2020 at 7:29 PM, Allen said:

My backyard is year round tropical in 7A now.  Potted bamboo helps me a lot.  All these bamboo are potted.  Bissetii / Dwarf Bissetii and Spectabilis are the ones I use.  I use garden trickery to hide the planters.  Sabal Minor and Needle should be your go to.  You can also plant Christmas ferns as ground cover.  I would plant some Trachy and cover them in winter too if you have the inclination.

Video below is my winter look in 7A but Trachy and the Mule will get covered if it needs it.  All evergreen in the video except the Jap maple and the planted out Majesty palms in the beginning.

IMG_3445.thumb.JPG.5387d5daa50215b26be90368d7edc306.JPG

 

 

 

IMG_1849.JPG

IMG_3696.JPG

That looks incredible. How long have you been growing it all?

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Allen
47 minutes ago, LouisvillePalmer said:

That looks incredible. How long have you been growing it all?

Mainly since 2017

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Manalto

Might I suggest Poncirus trifoliata or a cultivar P. trifoliata 'Flying Dragon'? Citrus evokes warmer climes, they have golf-ball-sized orange fruit (good in cocktails) and 'Flying Dragon' is such an oddball.

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Swolte

I'd also recommend euphorbia. They come in all shapes, sizes, and colors and some are listed as hardy to your zone. A favorite of mine is Euphorbia x martinii ‘Ascot Rainbow’. There are quite some nice-looking (and friendly) ligustrum varieties on the market that may also work for you.  

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climate change virginia

since you are in zone 6b plant a trachycarpus 'bulgaria' strain

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LouisvillePalmer
On 12/19/2020 at 11:38 AM, climate change virginia said:

since you are in zone 6b plant a trachycarpus 'bulgaria' strain

It's on my list down the road to try out, but I am not a fan of having to protect plants in the winter, other than natural protection like a south facing wall or being close to the house.

 

I think a Trachy Bulgaria needs 7a or 7b to survive. It might be a few degrees too cold here to grow. Do you have proof of it growing in 6b without protection?

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LouisvillePalmer
On 12/18/2020 at 8:58 PM, Manalto said:

Might I suggest Poncirus trifoliata or a cultivar P. trifoliata 'Flying Dragon'? Citrus evokes warmer climes, they have golf-ball-sized orange fruit (good in cocktails) and 'Flying Dragon' is such an oddball.

I like this idea. Are there other citrus or citrus-like fruits that bloom in winter? I know citrus ichangensis is supposedly hardy to 6b.

Thanks,

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LouisvillePalmer

I tried to edit my original post to give an update of all the suggestions so far, but I wasn't able to. Below are the suggestions given so far.

·         Agave Paaryi - "flagstaff form”

·         Agave Havardiana - "glass mountain form"

·         Aucuba Japonica - Gold Dust 

·         Bamboo – Bissetii

·         Camellia

·         Cacti

·         Poncirus trifoliata cultivar 'Flying Dragon'

·         Rhodendron - Gomer Waterer

·         Sacred Lily - "Rohdea Japonica"

·         Yucca – Bright Edge

·         Yucca – Color Guard

·         Yucca – Texas Red

Evergreen Ferns:

·         Cytomium fortunei - Hardy Japanese holly fern

·         Polysticum munitum - Western Sword Fern

·         Asplenium scolopendrium - Hart's Tongue Fern

·         Christmas Fern

Protection Needed:

·         Crape Myrtles

·         Trachycarpus 'bulgaria' strain

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Keys6505

Araucaria araucana aka the "Monkey Puzzle Tree" is another one that should be 6b hardy and will stay evergreen.  

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amh

I'm a huge fan of Poncirus trifoliata, but the tree will become deciduous at about 20F.

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Manalto
On 1/12/2021 at 1:09 PM, LouisvillePalmer said:

I like this idea. Are there other citrus or citrus-like fruits that bloom in winter? I know citrus ichangensis is supposedly hardy to 6b.

Thanks,

Oops, sorry. I somehow missed "evergreen" in the title of the thread - see below. Poncirus blooms in the spring.

 

12 hours ago, amh said:

I'm a huge fan of Poncirus trifoliata, but the tree will become deciduous at about 20F.

Yes, and in my experience they shed leaves even sooner. The ones I have in Alabama have only seen 28F and they (all but one, oddly) have dropped their leaves. I don't mind, especially the 'Flying Dragon' since it has an interesting winter silhouette, but it's good to know when you position them in the landscape. 

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amh
9 minutes ago, Manalto said:

Yes, and in my experience they shed leaves even sooner. The ones I have in Alabama have only seen 28F and they (all but one, oddly) have dropped their leaves. I don't mind, especially the 'Flying Dragon' since it has an interesting winter silhouette, but it's good to know when you position them in the landscape. 

I have the standard type, but I think the cold is only half the reason the leaves fall, some plants do retain their leaves while others turn red before they fall.

The gnarly nature of the flying dragon cultivar ensures a visually fascinating plant throughout the seasons.

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Chester B
22 hours ago, amh said:

I'm a huge fan of Poncirus trifoliata, but the tree will become deciduous at about 20F.

I don't find this at all.  They drop their leaves the same time as the rest of the deciduous trees do around here which is usually before our first frost.  They stick around for me into mid November and drop regardless of temps.  Mine is the flying dragon and for me the leaves turn yellow and bright orange.

Edited by Chester B

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amh
1 hour ago, Chester B said:

I don't find this at all.  They drop their leaves the same time as the rest of the deciduous trees do around here which is usually before our first frost.  They stick around for me into mid November and drop regardless of temps.  Mine is the flying dragon and for me the leaves turn yellow and bright orange.

Interesting.

My experience might be related to my latitude. Does anyone in Florida or south Texas grow P. trifolia?

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Manalto
1 hour ago, Chester B said:

I don't find this at all.  They drop their leaves the same time as the rest of the deciduous trees do around here which is usually before our first frost.  They stick around for me into mid November and drop regardless of temps.  Mine is the flying dragon and for me the leaves turn yellow and bright orange.

This is how mine behaved (yellow, not orange) in Connecticut (41.8N) but so far, as I mentioned, they're erratic in Alabama (30.8N), if latitude (daylight length) is a factor. I was scolded by a horticulturist at the Mobile Botanical Garden for growing Poncirus; she claims they are invasive. Michael Dirr ("Manual of Woody Landscape Plants") notes that they have escaped cultivation in Georgia and Texas. Mine are unlikely to do so in my small city plot; they have nowhere to go. I'm in the process of germinating seeds to grow a hedge of 'Flying Dragon'. 

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climate change virginia
On 1/12/2021 at 12:17 PM, LouisvillePalmer said:

I think a Trachy Bulgaria needs 7a or 7b to survive. It might be a few degrees too cold here to grow. Do you have proof of it growing in 6b without protection?

no but its a thought

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Nj Palms

 

All Evergreen except Lagerstoemia.

Osmanthus x Fortunei Very fragrant flowers in fall and can be limbed up to be a nice small or medium sized tree

Osmanthus fortunei 'Fruitlandii' Fragrant flowers but hardier than O.heterophyllus.

A few more Osmanthus hybrids.

Acuba Japonica and its hybrids.

Loads of Ilex (Holly) hybrids to choose from.

Quercus myrsinifolia and Quercus virginiana may be worth a try. Both evergreen oaks.

Crape Myrtles have amazing winter (peeling splotchy bark) and summer interest. 

Eucalyptus. Species such as E.neglecta, niphophila, and many more can be die back perennials in 6b.

Fatsia japonica

'Encore' Azaelas bloom all summer and are evergreen here in 7a dont know about 6b.

Pinus tadea and Pinus palustris both should be hardy in 6b.

Camellias 'Winters Joy' 'April Remembered'

Daphniphyllum macropodum similar to rhododendron.

Hardy Gardenias with a heavy pinestraw in winter.

Fatsehedra. Hybrid bewtween English Ivy and Fatsia japonica. Considered to have a "bine" habit.

Many more but heres just a few I have tried.

Edited by Nj Palms

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