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Marius

A couple of my palms that were unaffected by our past severe winter. 

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Marius

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cbmnz

What is the pinnate species in the first post? Jubaea Chilensis?

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Marius

Phoenix reclinata. Habitat collected on KZN South Coast

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Marius

The other pinnate one is Jubaeopsis 

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Marius

Here is my Jubaea chiliensis 

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Marius

Needle palm

Wallicia oblongifolia

Howea fosteriana

C seifrizii, tepejelote, plumosa, elegans, oblongata, microspadix, 

Lanonia dasyantha 

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greysrigging

The Clivias looking good and the Agapanthus not far off flowering.... as they should ! South African natives.....

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Marius

Thank you. Yes, they are both reliable staples. 

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jimmyt

Very beautiful Botanical Garden you have there Marius.  

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Marius

Thank you James. I’m always looking for new species to add. My garden consists of South African natives and palms, cycads, aquatics and orchids from all over the world. 

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greysrigging

Especially nice given the climatic difficulties you have there.....
For those who may not realize, Bloemontein is about 4.600' altitude and is prone to severe ( by Southern Hemisphere standards ) frosts in winter. And is far enough north and east to have a summer rainfall bias, with, on average, most of the 20"-22" falling in spring, summer and autumn.. Winters are predominantly dry with the clear skies and altitude meaning lots of frosts.

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palmfriend

Beautiful garden and very good/healthy looking species - thank you very much for posting!

best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

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Marius
7 hours ago, greysrigging said:

Especially nice given the climatic difficulties you have there.....
For those who may not realize, Bloemontein is about 4.600' altitude and is prone to severe ( by Southern Hemisphere standards ) frosts in winter. And is far enough north and east to have a summer rainfall bias, with, on average, most of the 20"-22" falling in spring, summer and autumn.. Winters are predominantly dry with the clear skies and altitude meaning lots of frosts.

That is about spot on. Thank you for your compliment. I do put a lot of effort into my garden. 

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Marius
6 hours ago, palmfriend said:

Beautiful garden and very good/healthy looking species - thank you very much for posting!

best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

Thank you Lars. I enjoy your garden posts too. 

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necturus

Lovely garden. How cold did it get?

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Marius

These are the June daily low temperatures in degrees Celsius:

 

i didn’t measure temperatures myself this past winter, but my lows would probably have been 3 or 4 degrees warmer than most of Bloemfontein due to my microclimate. 

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Tracy
7 hours ago, Marius said:

 

i didn’t measure temperatures myself this past winter, but my lows would probably have been 3 or 4 degrees warmer than most of Bloemfontein due to my microclimate. 

Brrrr... I saw that -9C in the lineup and even if that was 3 to 4 degrees C warmer, you still had something around -6C to -5C for a time.  I didn't realize it was that cold there, but the altitude explains a lot.  I didn't see any really nasty damage on any of your plants so you came through pretty well Marius!  Everything will only start looking happier as spring progresses down under and you soon head into summer.

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greysrigging

There really wouldn't be an equivalent climate in Australia, with the warmish days ( above 20c ) and nightly severe frosts in winter
Nearest would be the New England districts in Northern NSW,  they also have some altitude, ( +1000m or 3,300' ). Some other inland towns ( like Cooma and Orange ) get the frosts, but have much lower winter max temps.
Yours is an impressive garden with those winter minimums !

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Marius

 

I did have five palms that were badly damaged:

Ravenea rivularis. 

Ravenea hildebrandti. 

Beccariophoenix alfredi. 

Caryota mitis. 

Gaussia princeps. 

Most of them still appear alive. We’ll see if they pull through. 

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greysrigging
1 hour ago, Marius said:

 

I did have five palms that were badly damaged:

Ravenea rivularis. 

Ravenea hildebrandti. 

Beccariophoenix alfredi. 

Caryota mitis. 

Gaussia princeps. 

Most of them still appear alive. We’ll see if they pull through. 

The Caryota mitas is a brave planting in your climate.... they're generally very tropical in requirements being native in south east Asia. We regard them as a pest species in Darwin, they tend to naturalise , with seeds being distributed by birds and bats.

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Marius

I’m hoping that it will become a pest in my garden.

Pictures:

R rivularis- spear pull

C mitis- looks like it will recover 

R hildebrandti - defoliated- new spear growing

Next two pics - 2 foxtails- one with new spear , one maybe dead. 

G princeps- recovering 

i haven’t taken pictures of the Becarriophoenix yet. 

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Tracy
10 hours ago, Marius said:

R rivularis- spear pull

C mitis- looks like it will recover 

R hildebrandti - defoliated- new spear growing

Next two pics - 2 foxtails- one with new spear , one maybe dead. 

G princeps- recovering 

i haven’t taken pictures of the Becarriophoenix yet. 

Ouch... yes, these got hit worse than your initial photos showed.

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Marius

Yes. These are the casualties. If they don’t work I’ll replace them with another species that might work. 

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