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climate change virginia

Hardy Alternative to bottle palm zone 8a

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climate change virginia

Hi is there a hardy alternative to bottle palms that can survive in zone 8a I don't care about the leaves the leaves can be pinnate palmate either one is fine. Thanks. :)

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PalmatierMeg

None. You should be looking at Trachycarpus, needle palm, Sabal minor, maybe Serenoa repens.

But I've been told that bottle palms are amenable to pot growing. You will have to keep it indoors during winter.

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jwitt

Nolina longfolia - hardy in my z7b. Check google pics.  Not a palm, beargrass. But looks somewhat similar, trunkwise.

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climate change virginia
4 hours ago, jwitt said:

Nolina longfolia - hardy in my z7b. Check google pics.  Not a palm, beargrass. But looks somewhat similar, trunkwise.

oh cool my neighbors grow that

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Nj Palms
On 10/26/2020 at 6:50 AM, jwitt said:

Nolina longfolia - hardy in my z7b. Check google pics.  Not a palm, beargrass. But looks somewhat similar, trunkwise.

I’m assuming it doesn’t take moisture well and that’s why it’s not seen here in the East? 

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jwitt

The poster said his neighbor had one in Virginia. Mine came from North Carolina where it has been successfully grown for quite some time.  It grows naturally in a  region of Mexico not considered desert. My two cents.

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Nj Palms
1 hour ago, jwitt said:

The poster said his neighbor had one in Virginia. Mine came from North Carolina where it has been successfully grown for quite some time.  It grows naturally in a  region of Mexico not considered desert. My two cents.

Interesting. Might have to get my hands on one!

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climate change virginia
On 10/27/2020 at 10:06 PM, Nj Palms said:

Interesting. Might have to get my hands on one!

I think they cover it during the winter with plastic wrap

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