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KsLouisiana

Trying to move a sabal palm

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KsLouisiana

So we live in Lake Charles, La. Recently devastated by hurricane Laura.  While driving around I noticed a fairly large palmetto tree in the ditch that someone removed from their property (4ft trunk). It looks like it will transplant pretty well.  I have a few questions from the experts. Does anyone have experience moving these? How much would one with a 4 ft trunk weigh? Because we would probably have to pick it up by hand to get it in the bed of the truck. ( two 30ish year old guys) 2nd question. Does it look healthy? I feel like it's in perfect shape. Haha. Well any tips and advice would be greatly.  I will attach a picture.  Thanks!

Kurt

 

20201020_090733.jpg

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Johnny Palmseed
1 hour ago, KsLouisiana said:

So we live in Lake Charles, La. Recently devastated by hurricane Laura.  While driving around I noticed a fairly large palmetto tree in the ditch that someone removed from their property (4ft trunk). It looks like it will transplant pretty well.  I have a few questions from the experts. Does anyone have experience moving these? How much would one with a 4 ft trunk weigh? Because we would probably have to pick it up by hand to get it in the bed of the truck. ( two 30ish year old guys) 2nd question. Does it look healthy? I feel like it's in perfect shape. Haha. Well any tips and advice would be greatly.  I will attach a picture.  Thanks!

Kurt

 

20201020_090733.jpg

You can try but it might be a waste of time and effort. The simple fact is that they were only concerned with removing it, not transplanting it. So it’s likely no care was taken in the process. I have also read that this size is not ideal for Sabals to be transplanted. The big ones can tolerate root removal and will regrow but the smaller ones need to be transplanted with root ball intact.

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Joe NC

If you do try and transplant that, you will need to cut off ALL of the leaves (except the newest emerging spear).

This will prevent what is left of the plant from completely drying out, as all of the roots it has are dead/will die.

See the below link, and look at the info specific to Sabal palms.

https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/EP/EP00100.pdf

If you can lift it into the bed of a truck, you have nothing to loose by trying (except your time and effort).  Maybe it will have enough energy stored in the trunk to re-grow leaves and roots, maybe it will not.

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Chris Chance

I say do it! Might not make it but get it planted and put up supports. If it makes it you probably won't see growth for a while since it needs to regenerate roots but could be worth the work.

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JLM

I say why not? If you do decide to to do it follow directions above. Plenty of water!!!! No fertilizer other than maybe a root stimulator, although i would get other advice before using a root stimulator as i have never used it before and im not that experienced. Hope it makes it!

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hbernstein

Not the best time of year to stimulate new growth! You would stand a much better chance of success going into Summer.

If you do try it,  give the existing rootball a thorough soaking everyday for the first week, every other day for the second, then twice a week for the next two. It's a schedule that seems to work for Sabal installations. I agree that this one is too small and has been poorly treated, so it probably won't survive, but it is worth trying. Sabals are tough, tough plants.

Edited by hbernstein
grammar
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WaianaeCrider

No knowledge of moving Sabals, but they are tough.  I have a S. minor that is living w/out irrigation for at least 15 years where we get less than 20" a year.  And I thought it was a swamp lover.  LOL

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KsLouisiana

Thank yall for your input and knowledge.  I think I'll try it.  If we can get it picked up and the roots are semi intact. Whats it gonna hurt? We found a small one on the beach earlier this year and successfully rehabbed it. I'll attach a picture. The first one is from June, the 2nd one is from August 

20200524_164603.jpg

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NOT A TA

Just cut all the roots off and give it a shot. Being that we're going into the cooler months and it's got some trunk it will probably live if you keep it soaked  over the next 6-8 months and cut off all the foliage but the newest spear now before moving/planting. Don't bother thinking the roots can be "saved", doesn't work that way with Palmettos. Clip them off to nubs, flood the hole you plant it in making soup with the soil as you fill it in so there's no air pockets. Put some stakes to keep it from blowing over or moving around while it's trying to grow new roots. You can't over water it so just keep watering through spring or longer.

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Chester B

I say go for it.  The only thing you have to lose is some of your time.

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KsLouisiana

Update.  So we got the tree out the debris pile....barely.  Trimmed up the leaves and roots. Got it into the truck and to the house. We're waiting to plant this week.  But it doesn't seem very damaged at all.  It looks like it was growing at the base of a tree and uprooted when the tree fell in the hurricane.  So we're pretty hopeful. Thanks for the advice everyone.  Will definitely keep y'all updated on the progress.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by KsLouisiana
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amh

Nothing ventured, nothing gained. Best of luck on the replanting.

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KsLouisiana

Update.  So we got the tree out the debris pile....barely.  Trimmed up the leaves and roots. Got it into the truck and to the house. We're waiting to plant this week.  But it doesn't seem very damaged at all.  It looks like it was growing at the base of a tree and uprooted when the tree fell in the hurricane.  So we're pretty hopeful. Thanks for the advice everyone.  Will definitely keep y'all updated on the progress.  

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Brucer

I had to move one a few years ago in my garden, it was smaller, and I got more roots, but it died. Hope you have better luck.

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KsLouisiana

Thanks Brucer. Let's hope for the best! All we can do is try. And if we're successful we get some cool free shit! Lol

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KsLouisiana

Update.

Got er in the ground. Looking good still. We definitely have to stake it tomorrow!

20201113_134002.jpg

Edited by KsLouisiana
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Palmfarmer

It looks amazing lets hope it recover fast. Wish i could find lose palms in my area too haha

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KsLouisiana

Got it staked

20201114_144035.jpg

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JLM

Looking nice! That should be a great spot for it. I really hope it makes it!

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Merlyn

That looks great, just don't drive screws or nails into the trunk.  The FL Sabal transplanters use metal straps or similar, but no nails.  You could use something like baling wire to wrap around the metal stakes and trunk.  That way you don't create trunk holes as a possible source of infection.

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NOT A TA

looks like a good job. Keep it wet and don't hesitate to soak the trunk as well as the ground to reduce transpiration. You really can't over water it.

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KsLouisiana
On 11/14/2020 at 3:14 PM, JLM said:

Looking nice! That should be a great spot for it. I really hope it makes it!

Thanks man. I will keep y'all informed.  It seems to be already growing.  So they grow wild here in Louisiana but definitely not as common as Florida so they're pretty special.  :)

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KsLouisiana
On 11/14/2020 at 6:31 PM, NOT A TA said:

looks like a good job. Keep it wet and don't hesitate to soak the trunk as well as the ground to reduce transpiration. You really can't over water it.

Thanks man! It seems to be already growing! Weather has been so beautiful though! I water it every day.  I will keep y'all updated 

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KsLouisiana
On 11/14/2020 at 5:25 PM, Merlyn2220 said:

That looks great, just don't drive screws or nails into the trunk.  The FL Sabal transplanters use metal straps or similar, but no nails.  You could use something like baling wire to wrap around the metal stakes and trunk.  That way you don't create trunk holes as a possible source of infection.

Thats a great idea. I won't drill into it. The ground here has a little more clay in it so its kind of stuck already. With the stakes especially.  Thanks for the info!

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