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Palmfarmer

Most tropical looking palms for 9B?

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Palmfarmer

Hey, as the title states i am looking for some more tropical looking palms for my garden in 9B Climate zone, very dry climate, but i supplement all my palms with water. Could you guys give me some suggestions? Thank you

 

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GottmitAlex

Beccariophoenix alfredii.

Cunninghamiana's

(Pinnate palms) For starters 

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Darold Petty

Brahea edulis, when well watered and fertilized, can look as tropical as a Pritchardia.  If I had a larger yard I would have one myself.  :winkie:

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palmsOrl

Chamaedorea radicalis, Chamaedorea microspadix, Chamaedorea cataractum (marginal), Syagrus romanzoffiana (fertilize me!!!), Archontophoenix cunninghamiana (my vote for # 1), Roystonea Regia (marginal, but can work in very warm 9b), maybe Clinostigma savoryanum?, Ptychosperma macarthurii in a sheltered spot, Phoenix roebelenii (slightly marginal), Phoenix rupricola, a number of Dypsis species (experts fill me in), Veitchia arecina (marginal, but give a couple a try), try Thrinax radiata, a marginal choice, but I think it looks tropical, Arenga engleri, Livistona chinensis and other Livistona species, Wodyetia bifurcata (marginal), Bismarckia nobilis (marginal in colder 9b)...

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PalmatierMeg

Bismarckia

Pseudophoenix sargentii

Dypsis pembana (maybe, if you aren't too dry)

Livistona decora

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James B

I don’t think there is an actual answer to this question. I think it’s a matter of preference. 

For example: for me: I think of pinnate palms as being more tropical. I think of fan palms and palms with armed fronds(Phoenix) as being Mediterranean or desert palms.

Someone maybe have a different view. 
 

 

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Really full garden

I think to achieve a tropical look it takes more than planting a few palms. It is the combination of heights, leaf color, texture. 
A nice contrast of pinnate and palmate palms combined with appropriate companion plants 

I have seen some spectacular tropical looking gardens even in 9A !

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GottmitAlex
11 minutes ago, James B said:

I don’t think there is an actual answer to this question. I think it’s a matter of preference. 

For example: for me: I think of pinnate palms as being more tropical. I think of fan palms and palms with armed fronds(Phoenix) as being Mediterranean or desert palms.

Someone maybe have a different view. 
 

 

Same here!

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GottmitAlex

You want to endeavor with Foxtails and Royals!

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palmsOrl

As far as the tropical look with palmate palms, Licuala and Pritchardia really do it for me, but most of these have Tropical requirements.  Pritchardia hillebrandii might be worth a try in 9b.  Licuala peltata sumawongii worked for me here for a couple years before I moved, but it didn’t see below 30F, I highly doubt it would really  work in 9b.  

Oh, Howea forsteriana and belmoreana, particularly in areas without really hot humid summers (like Florida, though a few in FL have had success with Howea forsteriana).  I wonder how these would do in 9b microclimates of coastal Georgia where the heat is a bit less intense.

Some might say Jubaea chilensis.  This palm is certainly more than cold hardy in zone 9b, but it tends to require a Mediterranean climate.

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rprimbs

I would go with a Beccarophoenix alfredii for a coconut look, and a Rhopalostylis for -- what I consider -- a tropical look.  And I could be wrong but I think a Bizmarkia nobilis is hardy to 9B.  It is just a cool HUGE blue silver fan palm.

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Palmfarmer

 

23 minutes ago, rprimbs said:

I would go with a Beccarophoenix alfredii for a coconut look, and a Rhopalostylis for -- what I consider -- a tropical look.  And I could be wrong but I think a Bizmarkia nobilis is hardy to 9B.  It is just a cool HUGE blue silver fan palm.

Great suggestion, I have also looked at Parajubaea for something even more cold hardy. Bismarckias are beatiful and among my favorites but i allready have a small one in ground, but thanks for the suggestion.

Many great suggestions from all of you thank you to each and everyone for the suggestions, i will check out the ones i dont know. 

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RedRabbit
3 hours ago, palmsOrl said:

As far as the tropical look with palmate palms, Licuala and Pritchardia really do it for me, but most of these have Tropical requirements.  Pritchardia hillebrandii might be worth a try in 9b.  Licuala peltata sumawongii worked for me here for a couple years before I moved, but it didn’t see below 30F, I highly doubt it would really  work in 9b.  

Oh, Howea forsteriana and belmoreana, particularly in areas without really hot humid summers (like Florida, though a few in FL have had success with Howea forsteriana).  I wonder how these would do in 9b microclimates of coastal Georgia where the heat is a bit less intense.

Some might say Jubaea chilensis.  This palm is certainly more than cold hardy in zone 9b, but it tends to require a Mediterranean climate.

I think Georgia summers are actually a little hotter than FL. 

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palmsOrl

I think much of the interior of Georgia probably has summer high temperature averages rivaling much of the interior of Florida, albeit for a shorter period of time than most of Florida.  The average highs of coastal Florida are probably lower than most of Georgia but the average summer lows of coastal Florida are much higher.  Also, while Georgia, as well as most of the eastern US has warm to hot, humid summers, the humidity averages of interior Georgia in the summer are likely lower than almost anywhere in Florida.

I lived in Gainesville, FL for a couple years and even there, while scorching hot, the summers were not quite as humid as Orlando.  Likewise, the summers in Orlando are less humid than in South Florida.

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NickJames

You want a royal. ;)

FF7559D7-5740-4A00-8AFB-A590835D2902.jpeg

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palmsOrl

That is a lovely royal Nick.

Maybe Georgia is hotter than Florida at the peak of summer?

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NickJames
7 hours ago, palmsOrl said:

That is a lovely royal Nick.

Maybe Georgia is hotter than Florida at the peak of summer?

I would agree from my experience that parts of Georgia have higher temperature extremes than Florida. 

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Mr.SamuraiSword

Copernicia is a good choice and some of those are really tropcial looking IMO

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Kiplin

Chambreyonias are super tropical. I've got 9 of them lol and they look amazing.  Also some dypsis Pembanas look really nice as well.

IMG_20200919_124112.jpg

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Merlyn2220

Silver Bismarckia are a solid 9B palm.  Most FL reports on KinzyJr's spreadsheet have it with little or to moderate leaf damage at 25F, though there are a few with 80% damage listed.  In the upper 20s (-2C or so) it'll take no damage.  Green ones are reportedly much less hardy.

There are a LOT of warm 9B palms that would work, but some wouldn't like the dry air.  If you don't drop below -2C or -3C then you have a lot of options.  Licuala Peltata v. Sumawongii is supposed to be ok in the upper 20s, so is Chambeyronia Macrocarpa aka Flamethrower.  Allagoptera Arenaria is a neat smaller kinda-shrublike palm and good to 23F or lower.  Arenga Engleri (NOT the similar-looking Arenga Tremula) is hardy to 22F or lower.  Monster tropicals like Arenga Pinnata and Attalea Cohune take some damage in the upper 20s but generally survive.  Gaussia Princeps is a hardier Bottle-ish palm that survived the Leu Gardens 2 days of ~29F with some damage while all the Bottles and Spindles died.  Clustering ones like Ptychosperma Macarthurii have been burned to the ground in Daytona Beach @ 22F, but regrew from the roots.

I don't know about handling dry air on the above palms, my only experience is in the Floriduh swamp.  :D

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tim_brissy_13

I’ve always thought Dypsis onilahensis (weeping form) looks nearly as tropical as anything considering it is one of the most cold hardy crownshafted palms. 

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kinzyjr

@Palmfarmer

I've attached a list of palms up to zone 9b for your reference.

One advantage that you have is that you have a dry climate, and it has been demonstrated that palms often survive lower temperatures in drier areas than more humid areas.  With whatever you decide to plant, good luck and let us know how everything does.

 

 

202009280000_9b_Palms.xlsx

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DoomsDave

Livistona chinensis

Buteagrus MULE

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sipalms

Going by your climate, and street view of what else is growing around Durango, you could definitely give Rhopalostylis Sapida a go, particularly the Chatham variety is better in full sun and tolerates more cold.

They are still best planted in partial shade though, providing a more tropical appearance. Great as an understory palm.

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Palmfarmer
2 hours ago, sipalms said:

Going by your climate, and street view of what else is growing around Durango, you could definitely give Rhopalostylis Sapida a go, particularly the Chatham variety is better in full sun and tolerates more cold.

They are still best planted in partial shade though, providing a more tropical appearance. Great as an understory palm.

Cool that you actually checked out the city with streetview, Did you find any thing unusual or "tropical"? yes that palm is one beauty

Edited by Palmfarmer

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sipalms
21 minutes ago, Palmfarmer said:

Cool that you actually checked out the city with streetview, Did you find any thing unusual or "tropical"? yes that palm is one beauty

The pleasure was mine! It looks like a nice place; I actually only took about 5 mins of looking and noticed things like bougainvillea, pygmy dates, ponytail palms, bananas all growing happily outside, alongside approximately 200,000 Queens and Washingtonias :-). So you should be fine with Rhopalostylis for cold hardiness. They don't like Floridian style heat + humidity apparently, but Durango seems rather dry. They also don't like super hot nights but looks like even summer in Durango can have comparatively mild nights?

The only thing is that Nikau (Rhopalostylis) like to be well fed and watered, it appears quite dry there. How much rainfall do you get?

There are plenty of other tropical looking palms that would do well there, as other posters have said. I only say Rhopalostylis because I have seen it a lot in habitat and think it looks super tropical if used right. (and I'm biased being from New Zealand!).

 

 

Edited by sipalms
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Palmfarmer
11 minutes ago, sipalms said:

The pleasure was mine! It looks like a nice place; I actually only took about 5 mins of looking and noticed things like bougainvillea, pygmy dates, ponytail palms, bananas all growing happily outside, alongside approximately 200,000 Queens and Washingtonias :-). So you should be fine with Rhopalostylis for cold hardiness. They don't like Floridian style heat + humidity apparently, but Durango seems rather dry. They also don't like super hot nights but looks like even summer in Durango can have comparatively mild nights?

The only thing is that Nikau (Rhopalostylis) like to be well fed and watered, it appears quite dry there. How much rainfall do you get?

There are plenty of other tropical looking palms that would do well there, as other posters have said. I only say Rhopalostylis because I have seen it a lot in habitat and think it looks super tropical if used right. (and I'm biased being from New Zealand!).

 

 

thanks, from late summer to autumn its rain season and it rains quite heavly for a couple of months. this year we got some floodings even. Rest of the year completly dry.  If the plant requires extra water it is no problem i provide all my palms with supplemental water. yes nights are mild in summer 15c and around 5c at the peak of winter. yes tons of of queens and washies haha. some areas has pretty much only phoenix palms also. I saw the city plant out a Small Bismarckia in a huge container in the main walking street on one side and a Butia on the other end, really cool to see the municipal being open to some more species. 

Right now the most tender thing in ground is a small majesty, you think it will survive? there is a wall of plants in the north for protection.

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sipalms
29 minutes ago, Palmfarmer said:

Right now the most tender thing in ground is a small majesty, you think it will survive? there is a wall of plants in the north for protection.

I don't really have any experience with majesties, but going by the above you should be fine. 

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GottmitAlex

Durango, Durango, México is 9B?

That is incredible.  Here again, B. alfredii would be my suggestion. 

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waykoolplantz

trying to understand intent...every palm is tropical. 

lets ask this backassward.  What is the least tropical looking palm.

when you figure that out i need help finding the wettest water

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GottmitAlex
6 minutes ago, waykoolplantz said:

trying to understand intent...every palm is tropical. 

lets ask this backassward.  What is the least tropical looking palm.

when you figure that out i need help finding the wettest water

So a Washingtonia is tropical?

 

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waykoolplantz

why would it not be....but i guess you feel it might be the least" tropical"

my jungle pretty tropical

 

D1E5976C-2FFE-4246-A15E-899ED5A96A35.jpeg

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waykoolplantz

would it not be tropical if Washies replaced Royals ?
.

Shagadellic

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GottmitAlex

They're desert palms...

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waykoolplantz
8 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

They're desert palms...

for you maybe...main course for others.

Tho it is one of a few that thrive there does not preclude it being tropical elsewhere

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Really full garden

I think Phoenix rupicola,Wallichia  oblongifolia and Rhapis multifida are very tropical looking palms that IMO are very under utilized in Zone 9B and marginal 10A regions.

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palmsOrl
3 hours ago, Really full garden said:

I think Phoenix rupicola,Wallichia  oblongifolia and Rhapis multifida are very tropical looking palms that IMO are very under utilized in Zone 9B and marginal 10A regions.

Of all the more common Rhapis species, I think multifida is the most tropical looking too.

Has anyone mentioned Kentiopsis oliviformis?  This one is supposedly worth a try in zone 9b and looks (and is) very tropical.

Roystonea borinqueana.  I am not sure if this, the Puerto Rican royal is actually a smidge more cold hardy than Roystonea regia, but in my experience it is at the very least equally cold hardy.

I would go ahead and try a majesty (Ravenea rivularis), but keep in mind that they really need a lot of water and regular feeding (or to be planted in a very moist site with rich soil).

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Palmfarmer
1 hour ago, palmsOrl said:

Of all the more common Rhapis species, I think multifida is the most tropical looking too.

Has anyone mentioned Kentiopsis oliviformis?  This one is supposedly worth a try in zone 9b and looks (and is) very tropical.

Roystonea borinqueana.  I am not sure if this, the Puerto Rican royal is actually a smidge more cold hardy than Roystonea regia, but in my experience it is at the very least equally cold hardy.

I would go ahead and try a majesty (Ravenea rivularis), but keep in mind that they really need a lot of water and regular feeding (or to be planted in a very moist site with rich soil).

Got Ravenea rivularis planted in a depression so it gets a ton of water when it rains in clayish soil, i have not fed it yet since i got it in ground only 3-4 months ago so i wait a bit. Some people grow Roystonea regia here and they do well even in the open. Kentiopsis oliviformis looks amazing. Maybe I am borderline 10A zone and all the readings are done at the airport which is in the middle of the desert. 

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Frond-friend42
21 hours ago, waykoolplantz said:

why would it not be....but i guess you feel it might be the least" tropical"

my jungle pretty tropical

 

D1E5976C-2FFE-4246-A15E-899ED5A96A35.jpeg

You did it.

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GottmitAlex
2 hours ago, Palmfarmer said:

Got Ravenea rivularis planted in a depression so it gets a ton of water when it rains in clayish soil, i have not fed it yet since i got it in ground only 3-4 months ago so i wait a bit. Some people grow Roystonea regia here and they do well even in the open. Kentiopsis oliviformis looks amazing. Maybe I am borderline 10A zone and all the readings are done at the airport which is in the middle of the desert. 

Durango city, Mexico. I would be zone pushing. Test out the limits. 

 

Btw, I've visited Guadiana park (20 years ago) . Loved the frogs they have (had) there.  (Insider Durango joke. I did visit it.) 

:greenthumb:

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