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Teegurr

Palm ID - In College Station

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Teegurr

 I saw this palm on my walk today. I'm thinking it's a butia? Let me know what you guys think. I appreciate the help!

20200910_075122.jpg

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Fusca

Yep, Butia odorata.  Those look large enough to be flowering as well.

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Teegurr
38 minutes ago, Fusca said:

Yep, Butia odorata.  Those look large enough to be flowering as well.

Thanks! Cool to see one.

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Fusca

I think they took it out because of the messy fruit, but there used to be a nice one in front of the McDonald's on University Drive.  It had the sweetest fruits of any Butia that I've ever tasted.   I germinated a few of the seeds from that tree but they're not going to be bearing fruit anytime soon.

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Teegurr
3 hours ago, Fusca said:

I think they took it out because of the messy fruit, but there used to be a nice one in front of the McDonald's on University Drive.  It had the sweetest fruits of any Butia that I've ever tasted.   I germinated a few of the seeds from that tree but they're not going to be bearing fruit anytime soon.

Wow, didn't know about their fruit! Good luck for your seeds!

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Fusca
2 hours ago, Teegurr said:

Wow, didn't know about their fruit! Good luck for your seeds!

Yes, the common name for Butia odorata is "pindo palm" or "jelly palm".  I've made jelly from the fruits (we used to call them "pindo dates") which is awesome!  Butias are quite variable so sometimes the fruit is yellow when ripe, sometimes orange, sometimes even a purplish-red.  The fruit typically a lot of fibers (sometimes little to none) which makes it a bit difficult to eat but the fruits themselves are very good right off the tree.

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Palmfarmer
On 9/10/2020 at 4:10 PM, Fusca said:

Yes, the common name for Butia odorata is "pindo palm" or "jelly palm".  I've made jelly from the fruits (we used to call them "pindo dates") which is awesome!  Butias are quite variable so sometimes the fruit is yellow when ripe, sometimes orange, sometimes even a purplish-red.  The fruit typically a lot of fibers (sometimes little to none) which makes it a bit difficult to eat but the fruits themselves are very good right off the tree.

I heard that Odorata is most likely not the right subspecies seen over most of southeastern US. Its basicly many different types of Butia and crosses probably hence why they can look so different. 

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Fusca
8 hours ago, Palmfarmer said:

I heard that Odorata is most likely not the right subspecies seen over most of southeastern US. Its basicly many different types of Butia and crosses probably hence why they can look so different. 

That's what I understand is the case - a lot of Butia catarinensis in Florida and mostly Butia odorata in Texas and lots of "mutts" from the various crosses here, there and in between!

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