Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Peachs

DACTYLIFERA vs FILIFERA vs CANARIENSIS

Recommended Posts

Peachs

Hello,

F6-D7-B872-B28-D-4649-A3-C8-713-D59-D2-B
 

If you had to plant palm trees in this area, with those minimum temperatures in winter, which one supports them better and recovers better in spring?
 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

Hello @Peachs, welcome to the forums!

On the Fahrenheit scale, the range is between 11.66F (-11.3C) and 25.7F (-3.5C).  If the climate is arid, you'll probably have luck with all three regardless.  If it is more moist and humid, then you'll probably have the best luck with the Phoenix canariensis in the coldest areas.  The areas with lows around -3.5C to -7C will probably be fine for all three species.

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ahosey01
7 hours ago, Peachs said:

Hello,

F6-D7-B872-B28-D-4649-A3-C8-713-D59-D2-B
 

If you had to plant palm trees in this area, with those minimum temperatures in winter, which one supports them better and recovers better in spring?
 

Thanks

If it’s a dry climate, you might also think about Brahea armata.  Similar to W. filifera in a lot of ways - desert adapted, similar size, palmate leaves, similarly cold-adapted - but has a nice blue color to it and the inflorescence is really cool.  Can definitely take mid teens in a dry climate.

Also, just out of curiosity, where is this?

Edited by ahosey01
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
15 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

Hello @Peachs, welcome to the forums!

On the Fahrenheit scale, the range is between 11.66F (-11.3C) and 25.7F (-3.5C).  If the climate is arid, you'll probably have luck with all three regardless.  If it is more moist and humid, then you'll probably have the best luck with the Phoenix canariensis in the coldest areas.  The areas with lows around -3.5C to -7C will probably be fine for all three species.

 

10 hours ago, ahosey01 said:

If it’s a dry climate, you might also think about Brahea armata.  Similar to W. filifera in a lot of ways - desert adapted, similar size, palmate leaves, similarly cold-adapted - but has a nice blue color to it and the inflorescence is really cool.  Can definitely take mid teens in a dry climate.

Also, just out of curiosity, where is this?


Inland area of Spain, dry area, far from the coast.  And for growth ... definitely much superior Filifera?  Or is the growth similar to Canariensis?  I would buy it with 2 meters and I don't want to wait 30 years for it to be a certain height!

Thank you so much

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr
1 hour ago, Peachs said:

Inland area of Spain, dry area, far from the coast.  And for growth ... definitely much superior Filifera?  Or is the growth similar to Canariensis?  I would buy it with 2 meters and I don't want to wait 30 years for it to be a certain height!

Thank you so much

Out of the three in my humid subtropical climate, Washingtonia filifera wins the speed of growth battle, hands down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fusca
1 hour ago, Peachs said:

Inland area of Spain, dry area, far from the coast.  And for growth ... definitely much superior Filifera?  Or is the growth similar to Canariensis?  I would buy it with 2 meters and I don't want to wait 30 years for it to be a certain height!

Thank you so much

Filifera will grow much faster than Brahea armata and both Phoenix palms.  Although both will survive the lower temperatures you will still need to provide protection in the first winter that they are planted if the temperatures drop to those numbers - especially if you start out with smaller palms.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ahosey01
6 hours ago, Fusca said:

Filifera will grow much faster than Brahea armata and both Phoenix palms.  Although both will survive the lower temperatures you will still need to provide protection in the first winter that they are planted if the temperatures drop to those numbers - especially if you start out with smaller palms.

Yeah, I third this filifera thing.

Full disclosure - my P. canariensis has put out fronds faster than both my neighbors' W. filifera this year, but I think it has something to do with the combination of two months of 110-118F (43.5-48C) highs and the massive amount of water I've given it.  In any normal year filifera will be the fastest.

Brahea armata is probably the slowest growing of the four mentioned palms, but in my mind is also the prettiest.  I found two with 7ft of trunk (2 meters) for $600 a piece.  Here's a photo of a flowering B. armata that I just pulled off the internet.  Based on the architecture in the background, this might even be somewhere in Spain (looks like Europe).

 

Palm Trees and Olive Trees for Sale in Spain, in Europe and Internationally  | Unique trees, Palm trees, Tree forest

Edited by ahosey01
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lzorrito
7 hours ago, Peachs said:

Inland area of Spain, dry area, far from the coast.  And for growth ... definitely much superior Filifera?  Or is the growth similar to Canariensis?  I would buy it with 2 meters and I don't want to wait 30 years for it to be a certain height!

Thank you so much

Hi!

I see you are from Salamanca province, high Meseta Ibérica, very very tough climate! Very hard to grow palms there...and many others plants. P. canariensis and someTrachycarpus Species are probably the most suitable, some Braeha species like B. armata are also a good bet. Butia odorata and yatay are also good candidates, as well as Rhapidophyllum histrix, but all depends on what look do you prentend.

Edited by lzorrito

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fusca
1 hour ago, ahosey01 said:

Full disclosure - my P. canariensis has put out fronds faster than both my neighbors' W. filifera this year, but I think it has something to do with the combination of two months of 110-118F (43.5-48C) highs and the massive amount of water I've given it.  In any normal year filifera will be the fastest.

I agree - Brahea armata is a beautiful palm.  I had the same experience last year with my P. canariensis - it grew faster than my W. filibusta (mostly filifera) but the Washie is outpacing it this summer which was/is hotter and drier than last year (probably 10 degrees cooler on the daily high temps than yours).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
1 hour ago, lzorrito said:

Hi!

I see you are from Salamanca province, high Meseta Ibérica, very very tough climate! Very hard to grow palms there...and many others plants. P. canariensis and someTrachycarpus Species are probably the most suitable, some Braeha species like B. armata are also a good bet. Butia odorata and yatay are also good candidates, as well as Rhapidophyllum histrix, but all depends on what look do you prentend.

Due to not being able to buy large palm trees at a good price in this area, what I am also looking for is rapid growth ... It is really hot for 2-3 months here (above 20 °).  The low temperature stability causes growth slowdowns, and if I choose slow palms in their natural habitat, they will be more so here.  I need a palm tree that also grows with less heat.  I already have several T. Fortunei.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lzorrito
17 minutes ago, Peachs said:

Due to not being able to buy large palm trees at a good price in this area, what I am also looking for is rapid growth ... It is really hot for 2-3 months here (above 20 °).  The low temperature stability causes growth slowdowns, and if I choose slow palms in their natural habitat, they will be more so here.  I need a palm tree that also grows with less heat.  I already have several T. Fortunei.

Large palms are expensive everywhere...but it all resumes to how much you want to spend.
Have you thought about a Butiagrus? Cold hardy enough for your climate and a good grower: https://www.ebay.es/itm/BUTIAGRUS-200-220-cm-pot-35-CM/303556463304?hash=item46ad600ac8:g:6PQAAOSwcSlerE99 or https://www.ebay.es/itm/BUTIAGRUS-160-180-cm-n-2-pot-35-CM/303629329245?hash=item46b1b7e35d:g:ON4AAOSwGzdfFqQu these look affordable and good sized, so when acclimatized and established they will for sure shoot up. The grower/seller is spanish and trusty. I have some palms from him and all top ones. Shipping within Spain also quite affordable as well.

You can also find some sized B. armata and Butias there. These may not be as fast growers as Butiagrus, but they are reliable.

May try Parajubaea, but it will grow much slower than the ones named above, but check the size and price of this one: http://www.paratujardin.com/ 300-350 cm 220€. Nice price for its size!

Or what about Copernicia alba, Livistona australis or Livistona decipiens/decora...?  L. decora is a cold hardy fast grower.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
59 minutes ago, lzorrito said:

Large palms are expensive everywhere...but it all resumes to how much you want to spend.
Have you thought about a Butiagrus? Cold hardy enough for your climate and a good grower: https://www.ebay.es/itm/BUTIAGRUS-200-220-cm-pot-35-CM/303556463304?hash=item46ad600ac8:g:6PQAAOSwcSlerE99 or https://www.ebay.es/itm/BUTIAGRUS-160-180-cm-n-2-pot-35-CM/303629329245?hash=item46b1b7e35d:g:ON4AAOSwGzdfFqQu these look affordable and good sized, so when acclimatized and established they will for sure shoot up. The grower/seller is spanish and trusty. I have some palms from him and all top ones. Shipping within Spain also quite affordable as well.

You can also find some sized B. armata and Butias there. These may not be as fast growers as Butiagrus, but they are reliable.

May try Parajubaea, but it will grow much slower than the ones named above, but check the size and price of this one: http://www.paratujardin.com/ 300-350 cm 220€. Nice price for its size!

Or what about Copernicia alba, Livistona australis or Livistona decipiens/decora...?  L. decora is a cold hardy fast grower.

 

Butiagrus is interesting, the problem is that for the price of 20cm of trunk I can buy 2 meters of trunk of W. Filifera, and more importantly, maybe 10 years ahead? But without a doubt they are very pretty although I suppose that their growth is not like the Syagrus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UK_Palms
1 hour ago, Peachs said:

Due to not being able to buy large palm trees at a good price in this area, what I am also looking for is rapid growth ... It is really hot for 2-3 months here (above 20 °).  The low temperature stability causes growth slowdowns, and if I choose slow palms in their natural habitat, they will be more so here.  I need a palm tree that also grows with less heat.  I already have several T. Fortunei.

My first suggestion would be Chamaerops Humilis and Chamaerops Argentea AKA 'Cerifera', both of which should be bulletproof in your location. They can take -10C without damage, providing the next day warms up above freezing. They are probably the most frost tolerant palm(s) in circulation, after Trachycarpus Fortunei. Plus Chamaerops are native to the European Med as well, including southern Spain, so it's good to plant native fauna in your garden. They do very well here in the UK where it is both wetter and cooler, although your winters appear to be a bit colder than here. But the bottom line is that Chamaerops really don't require much heat to grow and are pretty darn cold-hardy. 

Phoenix Canariensis will also grow with very little heat and take some pretty low temperatures, down to -8C before damage appears in a dry climate. Over here in southern England they seem to do pretty well with more and more large specimens appearing each year now, especially around London and the south coast. I have seen CIDP's go from about 6 foot in height, to about 20 foot in height, within about 5 years here. I would definitely give one a go, as long as you protect it a bit during the first few years, until it starts trunking. You'll probably also want to plant it in a south facing position, which gets all day sun in winter and is possibly sheltered from northerly winds by a barrier (house, fence, hedge, trees etc). This will help it get through it's first few winters. 

Third choice would be Washingtonia Filifera since you are in a pretty dry climate and Filifera is both drought resistant and can also handle pretty low temperatures. Seedlings can be a bit sensitive and suffer damage at -4C, but once trunking they should take -10C in a dry climate with only minor damage, and then as low as -15C once mature in a dry climate, although the foliage would probably take a big hit. I have heard of some surviving -20C in New Mexico and west Texas during big freezes. No doubt they were dry freezes and those just happened to be very hardy specimens. I would maybe recommend Filifera ahead of CIDP for you, depending on your lows. 

Just out of curiosity, what was your lowest temperature last winter just gone? And what is the lowest temperature you have seen in your lifetime there?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
9 hours ago, UK_Palms said:

My first suggestion would be Chamaerops Humilis and Chamaerops Argentea AKA 'Cerifera', both of which should be bulletproof in your location. They can take -10C without damage, providing the next day warms up above freezing. They are probably the most frost tolerant palm(s) in circulation, after Trachycarpus Fortunei. Plus Chamaerops are native to the European Med as well, including southern Spain, so it's good to plant native fauna in your garden. They do very well here in the UK where it is both wetter and cooler, although your winters appear to be a bit colder than here. But the bottom line is that Chamaerops really don't require much heat to grow and are pretty darn cold-hardy. 

Phoenix Canariensis will also grow with very little heat and take some pretty low temperatures, down to -8C before damage appears in a dry climate. Over here in southern England they seem to do pretty well with more and more large specimens appearing each year now, especially around London and the south coast. I have seen CIDP's go from about 6 foot in height, to about 20 foot in height, within about 5 years here. I would definitely give one a go, as long as you protect it a bit during the first few years, until it starts trunking. You'll probably also want to plant it in a south facing position, which gets all day sun in winter and is possibly sheltered from northerly winds by a barrier (house, fence, hedge, trees etc). This will help it get through it's first few winters. 

Third choice would be Washingtonia Filifera since you are in a pretty dry climate and Filifera is both drought resistant and can also handle pretty low temperatures. Seedlings can be a bit sensitive and suffer damage at -4C, but once trunking they should take -10C in a dry climate with only minor damage, and then as low as -15C once mature in a dry climate, although the foliage would probably take a big hit. I have heard of some surviving -20C in New Mexico and west Texas during big freezes. No doubt they were dry freezes and those just happened to be very hardy specimens. I would maybe recommend Filifera ahead of CIDP for you, depending on your lows. 

Just out of curiosity, what was your lowest temperature last winter just gone? And what is the lowest temperature you have seen in your lifetime there?

Thanks!

The lowest temperature last year was -8 °.  The lowest I have ever known is -10 °.  Syagrus romanzoffiana I guess totally ruled out?  I believe from what I read, that in combination of growth, price and resistance Filifera may be the best option.  I do not want it to be slow (wait 20 years until it begins to "be a palm tree"), or risk that a bad winter will destroy the palm tree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dalmatiansoap

What about Brahea Edulis, quite hardy and definitely faster then Armata. No to mention much affordable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UK_Palms
2 hours ago, Peachs said:

Thanks!

The lowest temperature last year was -8 °.  The lowest I have ever known is -10 °.  Syagrus romanzoffiana I guess totally ruled out?  I believe from what I read, that in combination of growth, price and resistance Filifera may be the best option.  I do not want it to be slow (wait 20 years until it begins to "be a palm tree"), or risk that a bad winter will destroy the palm tree.

-8C is still pretty cold. I live in a tiny rural village in southern England and my lowest was -3C last winter. Central London didn’t drop below +1.5C though and was frost free. But even here Syagrus Romanzoffiana is a bit risky. I didn’t protect them last winter, but it was very mild. 
 

Here are my own Syagrus Romanzoffiana at 51N. You could try zone pushing them like I am doing here, but I think they are too risky in your location if you are experiencing -8C most winters. They will get severely damaged and defoliate most winters where you are. -9C / -10C will probably kill them outright, even during a dry freeze.

14CC6B63-E304-4C2F-A3A9-A427D7E3C095.thumb.jpeg.d66a5ed9356c39824fd9ac323ca0890d.jpeg

2C4ED703-97EF-4426-8F6D-7CDEC7A7EAD3.thumb.jpeg.0a3d5f5125c769de93bd533decf6c870.jpeg

It’s probably better to stick to Chamaerops and Washingtonia Filifera. Maybe Phoenix Canariensis too, although that is a bit of a risk as well. CIDP’s are definitely hardier than Syagrus Romanzoffiana though. Certainly try a few Filifera’s as you say, since they grow relatively quick. I’d get a few Chamaerops as well as they should do well for you, although they are smallish palms and a bit slow. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lzorrito
13 hours ago, Peachs said:

Butiagrus is interesting, the problem is that for the price of 20cm of trunk I can buy 2 meters of trunk of W. Filifera, and more importantly, maybe 10 years ahead? But without a doubt they are very pretty although I suppose that their growth is not like the Syagrus

W. Filifera is not as fast growing as W. robusta (and shorter), and in a climate like yours should even be slower than usual. But, if you can buy them large and cheap...like told before, it's your choise and your money...as you cannot grow Syagrus there, I suggested Butiagrus, for aesthetic and diversity reasons...all the others are fan palms.

Edited by lzorrito
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sonoranfans

inland heat and sun is filifera habitat, they prefer it.  If you add water they do grow fast but they dont need it to survive once established.  A friend had (2) 24" bozes installedmaybe 30" tall.  IN 6 years when he sold th house thy were 25' tall and had 3' thick clear trunks.  In my 10 years in arizona I noticed the happiest and fastest of these palms was filifera, though armata(somewhat rare outside my yard) and dactylifera were also quite happy.  Carinensis was also "good" but they looked better in the east bay area CA, that is what they should look like.  If you dote on them, all will do well and be beautiful.  Public plantings in AZ is about as harsh as it gets, often irrigation lines are no longer functional. OF these palms the filifera and dactylifera both are the least dependent on irrigation water once established.  Filifera is easily more cold hardy than dactylifera in both sudden cold and maintained cold.  In sudden radiational cold event that big trunk and beard helps keep it warmer longer waiting for the morning sun.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lzorrito
20 hours ago, Peachs said:

the problem is that for the price of 20cm of trunk I can buy 2 meters of trunk of W. Filifera, and more importantly, maybe 10 years ahead?

Hummm...I've made some research...you can indeed buy 30€ per meter of trunk, so you can get a 10 mt high W. Filifera for the same price as a 2 mt Butiagrus or a 3 mt Parajubaea.

I see your point, value for money x size! You can get a large W. Filifera for a very reasonable price!:greenthumb: It's already large...don't need to wait. I think you'll be more than 10 years ahead!

https://www.milanuncios.com/plantas/palmeras-washingtonias-239433922.htm

And many other offers...

Well played! But make sure that it's a pure W. filifera, not a W. filibusta Hybrid...not so cold hardy.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fusca

To add on to @lzorrito's advice @Peachs look for red color on leaf petioles - this color indicates robusta or hybrid filibusta.  Washingtonia filifera will not have any red color on the petiole and the color of the leaf is more grayish green.  Robusta leaves are a brighter green.  The following link might be helpful to help you distinguish.

http://palmvrienden.net/gblapalmeraie/2017/07/05/how-to-recognize-the-difference-between-washingtonia-filifera-and-robusta/

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs

Thank you very much to all!  The only negative that Filifera has is perhaps that it is very common and that it is too dirty?  I think it will be the chosen one because Butiagrus is worth the meter of trunk 10 times more expensive

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lzorrito
8 minutes ago, Peachs said:

Thank you very much to all!  The only negative that Filifera has is perhaps that it is very common and that it is too dirty?  I think it will be the chosen one because Butiagrus is worth the meter of trunk 10 times more expensive

No, not too dirty. And it also depends on what look you want, clean or unclean trunk...me, I just love when they have a large old skirt.

Go for it!:greenthumb: And don't forget to update the post when planting!

Edited by lzorrito
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
51 minutes ago, lzorrito said:

No, not too dirty. And it also depends on what look you want, clean or unclean trunk...me, I just love when they have a large old skirt.

Go for it!:greenthumb: And don't forget to update the post when planting!

Thank you all very much for the welcome in the forum.  It was a pleasure!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UK_Palms
50 minutes ago, Peachs said:

100% Filifera?

B63-FE95-F-2-C19-4-A02-A3-AB-2-D9-ED7-AD

Hard to say. You need to get a close up of the petiole bases, to see if they are completely green, or whether they have some red/purple colouration. I'm not sure, but I think I can make out some red markings on the petiole bases in this picture. That would suggest Filibusta hybrid, or even a pure Robusta. I don't see many fibres on the fronds either, so it's probably a Filibusta or a Robusta. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
32 minutes ago, UK_Palms said:

Hard to say. You need to get a close up of the petiole bases, to see if they are completely green, or whether they have some red/purple colouration. I'm not sure, but I think I can make out some red markings on the petiole bases in this picture. That would suggest Filibusta hybrid, or even a pure Robusta. I don't see many fibres on the fronds either, so it's probably a Filibusta or a Robusta. 

E3500-F4-B-AE02-4-F8-E-A841-6-D69-E4538-
 

Thanks, being cylindrical and not conical I was not thinking about Robusta.

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UK_Palms
1 hour ago, Peachs said:

E3500-F4-B-AE02-4-F8-E-A841-6-D69-E4538-
 

Thanks, being cylindrical and not conical I was not thinking about Robusta.

 

Hmmm, there definitely looks to be at least some colouration on the petiole bases, indicating Robusta blood. It's probably a Filibusta hybrid, given the amount of spines on the petioles and the lack of fibres on the fronds too. Although the trunk is cylindrical as you say, I am pretty sure it is still a hybrid Filibusta. Most Washie's are these days. I can see traits of both Robusta and Filifera present in it, but mostly Robusta in my opinion. Hopefully you can get some more opinions from other people on here though, besides my own.

That's still a pretty good specimen nonetheless. Just out of curiosity, how much will it cost you to buy? If it's a good price, I would say buy it since it has quite a bit of trunk and will have decent hardiness even if it is a Filibusta hybrid, especially if it is planted in a good position that gets all day sun and is sheltered from cold northeasterly winds in winter. Here in the UK, a Washie that size would cost me about £400 (450) I reckon. Maybe a bit more! I definitely wouldn't spend too much money on it though if it is going to be a bit marginal in your climate...

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
23 minutes ago, UK_Palms said:

Hmmm, there definitely looks to be at least some colouration on the petiole bases, indicating Robusta blood. It's probably a Filibusta hybrid, given the amount of spines on the petioles and the lack of fibres on the fronds too. Although the trunk is cylindrical as you say, I am pretty sure it is still a hybrid Filibusta. Most Washie's are these days. I can see traits of both Robusta and Filifera present in it, but mostly Robusta in my opinion. Hopefully you can get some more opinions from other people on here though, besides my own.

That's still a pretty good specimen nonetheless. Just out of curiosity, how much will it cost you to buy? If it's a good price, I would say buy it since it has quite a bit of trunk and will have decent hardiness even if it is a Filibusta hybrid, especially if it is planted in a good position that gets all day sun and is sheltered from cold northeasterly winds in winter. Here in the UK, a Washie that size would cost me about £400 (450) I reckon. Maybe a bit more! I definitely wouldn't spend too much money on it though if it is going to be a bit marginal in your climate...

580€, Shipping included, in my opinion expensive not to be more Filifera...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
19 minutes ago, lzorrito said:

I see it, but when they are hybrids it is not so easy. From the first images of the link, it relates the color red with Filifera, is that correct? It should be green in my opinion. (Petiole)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lzorrito
22 minutes ago, Peachs said:

I see it, but when they are hybrids it is not so easy. From the first images of the link, it relates the color red with Filifera, is that correct? It should be green in my opinion. (Petiole)

At the end of that page you may also see how to distinguish hybrid W. filibusta. Did you seen it?

I know it's not easy to distinguish. Everyday I drive by hundreds of Washies...and many are hybrids(lots) and you need almost to "touch and smell" them to in order to distinguish...and sometimes it's hard, really hard.

Edited by lzorrito

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
43 minutes ago, lzorrito said:

At the end of that page you may also see how to distinguish hybrid W. filibusta. Did you seen it?

I know it's not easy to distinguish. Everyday I drive by hundreds of Washies...and many are hybrids(lots) and you need almost to "touch and smell" them to in order to distinguish...and sometimes it's hard, really hard.

Yes. But what I don't understand is because if it is Filifera 100% the reddish brown color is decisive (first image).  However, if it is hybrid, it is just the other way around, the red color is more Robusta.
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lzorrito
1 hour ago, Peachs said:


Others are examples sold as Filifera.

Honestly, both look like hybrids to me, and I'm saying that by looking to the leaf shape (more robusta shaped leaf) and its bright green colour (not waxy pale green as filifera), although it is very hard to positive ID by photo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peachs
10 hours ago, lzorrito said:

Honestly, both look like hybrids to me, and I'm saying that by looking to the leaf shape (more robusta shaped leaf) and its bright green colour (not waxy pale green as filifera), although it is very hard to positive ID by photo.

The last two do seem Filiferas, learning little by little!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lzorrito
8 hours ago, Peachs said:

The last two do seem Filiferas, learning little by little!

Yes...they seem...

Filifera, just taken:

IMG_20200916_105914.jpg

IMG_20200916_110016.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...