Jump to content

Recommended Posts

JasonD

Yesterday, thanks to International Palm Society members Darold Petty and Steve Klocksiem, I had the chance to visit the late Jack Dane's garden in San Francisco's Cow Hollow neighborhood. Wow! The biggest Juania australis I've seen flanks the back of the house and is paired with a tall, adult, staminate specimen of a Ceroxylon species I couldn't identify; a Livistona fulva rosette grows at the Juania's base. A self-sowing grove of nikau palms, Rhopalostylis sapida, proliferates, while a nice little clump of Laccospadix australasica occupies the shady center of this typically tiny San Francisco back yard, maybe 25ft / 7.6m wide an 40ft / 12.2m deep.

There's a very nice Rhopalostylis baueri and possibly another buried in thereJuania australis San Francisco Jack Dane's garden. A huge, robust Livistona species overtops all the palm trees in the garden, and a Ceroxylon quindiuense (semi-plumose type similar to those from Tenerife, Valle del Cauca in the San Francisco Botanical Garden collected by Garrin Fullington in the late 1970s) is still in a rosette with huge leaves in the shade. Plus, a few Chamaedorea and a couple of Howea forsteriana clumps are scattered about.
Also of interest are the rather tall Cyathea / Sphaeropteris medullaris and S. cooperi tree ferns.
Enjoy the photos!

Any advice on dealing with the alarming scar on the Juania trunk is welcome.

- Jason

  1. Juania australis & Livistona fulva
  2. Juania & Ceroxylon (right)
  3. Rhopalostylis sapida (mostly) and Livistona sp. (australis?)
  4. Rhopalostylis seedlings
  5. Ceroxylon sp.—a flowering-age male
  6. Rhopalostylis baueri, R. sapida, and Livistona sp.
  7. Same species as above.
  8. Possible Rhopalostylis baueri next to Archontophoenix cunninghamiana
  9. Juania australis trunk scar with Rhopalostylis baueri at left
  10. Juania australis crown, upward view
  11. Juania trunk again
  12. Juania trunk
  13. Photo posted at right, Rhopalostylis baueri, R. sapida, Livistona, Laccospadix

Rhopalostylis baueri in San Francisco

 

 

IMG_4422.jpg

IMG_4418.jpg

IMG_4423.jpg

IMG_4429.jpg

IMG_4431.jpg

IMG_4430.jpg

IMG_4424.jpg

IMG_4425.jpg

IMG_4426.jpg

IMG_4427.jpg

IMG_4428.jpg

Edited by JasonD
Names added corresponding to photos
  • Like 28
  • Upvote 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

@JasonD Thank you for sharing this garden!  It's nice to see some stuff that is gorgeous and just can't be done here.  The scar looks pretty bad.  Hope someone can help you with that.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Frond-friend42

Thanks for sharing. Could it be Ceroxylon echinulatum?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Firepalm

Thanks for posting these Jason.  That Juania is the biggest I've seen pics of in a domestic garden.  Hope that scarring isn't a sign of some kind of infection,  never seen something like that before. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tejas1978

Did the Juania have a tree stake on it at one point? Looks alot like a stake scar I commonly see on trees 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
realarch

Jason, thanks for taking the time to post photos of such beautiful mature specimens. They looked so healthy too. Gotta love those Nikau palms, so nice to see so many in one garden. I remember visiting Keith Boyer’s garden in Auckland, the number and variety of Nikau were memorable, something I’ll never forget.

Tim

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

Thanks for posting. That’s the biggest Juania I’ve seen pictured outside habitat. The scar looks like sunburn. Howeas sometimes get it. Some amazing plants grown at that place. I wish I lived much closer than I do. Pictures often don’t do reality justice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonD
On 8/28/2020 at 7:06 AM, Frond-friend42 said:

Thanks for sharing. Could it be Ceroxylon echinulatum?

That did come to mind—the size and the presentation of the fronds give that impression, somewhat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonD
13 hours ago, Tyrone said:

Thanks for posting. That’s the biggest Juania I’ve seen pictured outside habitat. The scar looks like sunburn. Howeas sometimes get it. Some amazing plants grown at that place. I wish I lived much closer than I do. Pictures often don’t do reality justice.

I agree, sunburn was my first impression. I hope that no bacteria or fungi get in there to mess things up.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonD
On 8/28/2020 at 2:03 PM, tejas1978 said:

Did the Juania have a tree stake on it at one point? Looks alot like a stake scar I commonly see on trees 

I don't think it was staked and the scar is too high up to have been made by a stake. I'm going with sunburn as the most likely culprit. The scar is on the southwest quadrant, our hottest direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonD
On 8/29/2020 at 3:17 PM, realarch said:

Jason, thanks for taking the time to post photos of such beautiful mature specimens. They looked so healthy too. Gotta love those Nikau palms, so nice to see so many in one garden. I remember visiting Keith Boyer’s garden in Auckland, the number and variety of Nikau were memorable, something I’ll never forget.

Tim

This garden really makes the case for planting nikau in San Francisco. They are too rare here. But they are thirsty, and most people want to be careful with their water budget.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LJG
2 hours ago, JasonD said:

I agree, sunburn was my first impression. I hope that no bacteria or fungi get in there to mess things up.

Yep. Winter, low sun angle burn. And yes, it’s dangerous as fungus can start. I lost two trunking Hedys this way. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BrianRBruning@gmail.com

My R. sapida always has burnt leaf edges esp. at the far end of the frond.  What is wrong? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • bdtaylor
      By bdtaylor
      Guys...has anyone seen the palms around the parking lot at the Ventura College West Entrance? Although they look a bit neglected and underwatered now, they're clearly very old and some are really weird species I've never seen in person before. I'm definitely gonna need help with ID below genus level (and sometimes genus too).
      1) Hyophorbe verschafeltii? Maybe Dypsis decipiens? 

      2) Pritchardia (no idea what species)

      3) Roystonea (regia?)

      4) Some sort of Ceroxylon (?!!!!)

      5) Pair of Parajubaea cocoides (right?)

      6&7) No freakin clue...something very tall and thin the likes of which I've only seen in Hawaii. Some kind of Dypsis right? I'm out of my depth 
      6) 
      8) Howea forsteriana and Rhopalostylis (species?) 

      9) Beautifully trunking clump of Acoelorrhaphe wrightii
      9) 
       

    • redbeard917
      By redbeard917
      It was nice to see that in Bogotá they are quite proud of their native Ceroxylon and commonly plant it as a street tree. I also saw some tall ones in a highway median on the way in but was unable to get a photo. It seems like the shuttlecock form as a juvenile is an advantage so it doesn't take up valuable space. I believe this pedestrian avenue with the rectangular pools of water surrounded by wax palms is called Avenida Jimenez de Quesada, and it goes on like that (albeit with car lanes on either side) for quite a ways, it appeared maybe as much as a quarter of a mile.





    • TheMadScientist
      By TheMadScientist
      April 17, 2021, I obtained with permission the first batch of ripe R. Baueri seeds.  I try to search all techniques posted by Palm Talkers to help my efforts lean towards success.  I kind of already wrote these off as I've never had success after 4 months.  Yesterday, I still went through the process of observing and 3 popped up.  The photo only shows 2 as focus failed trying to capture the 3rd.  The first photo shows the initial cleaned seeds.  I will now be looking more often this week.  The second batch of ripe seeds was started May 6, 2021, so I'm still a ways off.


    • Dimimelbourne
      By Dimimelbourne
      Hi all, 
      I have this very cute R. Baueri seedling that I repotted a few months ago. Besides 1 new spear opening up all summer, it hasn’t grown at all. I heard these are relatively fast growers and I’m trying to figure out what gives. I live in Melbourne and we had quite a good summer, it gets some morning sun but pretty much surrounded by other plants. Always kept moist and regularly fertilised. 
      Also we’re coming into our cooler months now should I bring it indoors for better results?
      Any advice would be really appreciated! 
      Dimitri
       



    • Grasswing
      By Grasswing
      Hello,
      I am interested in buying Ceroxylon quindiuense and other Ceroxylon species seeds. Does anyone know some reputable source (except RPS)? What is the season the seeds tend to be available? Any information greatly appreciated.
      Thanks
      Ondra
×
×
  • Create New...