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BamaPalmer

BEST OF LUCK THIS "STORM SEASON" IN THE NO. HEMISHERE!

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BamaPalmer

My best wishes to everyone in the Northern Hemisphere, as we begin our peak time of the year for "tropical" weather activity!!  May you avoid the eye wall of any and every tropical cyclone in these next 60 or so days of potential weather cataclysms!  All the best luck to every palm grower and lover out there on this wonderful but sometimes turbulent blue solar system celestial "marble"!  Andy.

PS: Below is our yard after Hurricane Wilma's 2005 random, but "messy pruning!"  It was pretty well sheared flat but 15 years later I cannot find any evidence of it ever having been here!!  It was pricey to get it beautiful, again, though!  (That went without saying, I suppose!)

01a5b0d82bbb5ee6df7e411b70f4a16b75df3931c7.jpg

Edited by BamaPalmer
better word usage!!
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Meangreen94z

Yeah both current tropical storms are aimed at my approximate area. I’m not too worried with smaller storms, they’ve completed 75% of a massive drainage/flood control project next to my neighborhood. It was about 20% in place when Harvey hit and made a big difference.

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PalmatierMeg

Hurricane Irma, 09-17

1047338253_HurricaneIrmadamage3509-11-17.jpg.baa83a107e59a0fd004376eda81d752d.jpg

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BamaPalmer

Hi, Meg and Hi, Daniel:   Meg, your photo looks intimately familiar!  That was a big Eu. deglupta that fell.  Ours wasn't that's big during Irma, so it didn't crack and fall...buy it IS big now, so it will look like yours did I guess, if the strongest winds are at it weak side!  Everything else was similarly twisted!  Good luck this season, Meg, with all my heart!  And Daniel, I will be wishing you all the best of all potential outcomes, also!  That drainage program SHOULD bear way better results!!  Here; not much...30 MPH winds Monday from 10 AM through 8 PM.  I would like to protect the Pelagodoxa henryana, since it would be yet severed from its rocky "home" yet, but I will begin loosening the support roots, then filling the "holes" with builders' coarse sand to keep therm all moist, and work my way around the perimeter of the Pelagodoxa's root system!!   

I have potted up already: Foxtails, Triangles, Cham. metallicas, Coconuts, and King Alexanders, and a few Golden Arecas.  I have yet to pot up: some Licualas, Verschafeltias, Decknias, Arreca vestiarias, Salaccas, and White Elelphant palm varieties to go yet.  I also have one decent specimen of Panama Hat Palm, which I will pot up, because I like it a lot.  The greenhouse will not be huge so I will be a bit prudent in the plant selection process!!   We'll see how this extrication project goes!  I wouldn't ever have done it, except for the fact that Jeff Marcus in  HI, doesn't have 1-gal Pelagodoxas for sale now, and I need to keep this precious 5-6' tall "teen-ager" alive!

Hugs and great support to all of my palm lovin' friends around the world!  Andy!

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BamaPalmer

I missed you a lot, "Doom's Dave"!  I am glad that we are together, again!  No more exile; no more fears (on my part.)  No one made/makes me chuckle as much as you!  You are a true "original" my friend! (as is the red, measuring sneaker!)  You always will be, Dave, my very favourite "Palm Talk" member! :floor:  Andy!

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BamaPalmer

Thank you for being you, David!  :rolleyes:

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Meangreen94z

Looks like a Category 3 is potentially bearing down on the Houston area

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DoomsDave

Praying for y'all.

 

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Meangreen94z

Thanks. Now predicted to be a Category 4 and hit the Texas-Louisiana border, we will still definitely be affected.

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