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LivistonaFan

Chamaedorea radicalis drought hardiness

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LivistonaFan

I have already asked this in a separate post but got no answer. Therefore I am now trying it again:)

Is this triple C. radicalis drought hardy enough to survive in a Mediterranean climate(not nearly as warm or dry as SoCal or inland Central/Northern California)  in almost full sun without additional irrigation? Palms for California evaluates its drought hardiness as moderate, like Parajubaea Torallyi. And I am sure that a Parajubaea would survive there once established. 

DSC_0026.thumb.JPG.500d02a18591c5782fe16e9915bfca42.JPG

 

Edited by LivistonaFan
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Fusca

Lambert, I'm not sure if this helps but I planted this C. radicalis beneath my largest Butia about a year and a half ago.  I'm always forgetting to water it since I don't water the Butia much.  It's probably been watered three or four times since planting.  I wouldn't say it's thriving but still looks pretty good considering the drought we're experiencing and the dozen or more times it's been over 100 degrees F (38 C).  It's in mostly bright shade with occasional filtered sun.

 

IMG_20200801_143657.jpg

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LivistonaFan
1 hour ago, Fusca said:

Lambert, I'm not sure if this helps but I planted this C. radicalis beneath my largest Butia about a year and a half ago.  I'm always forgetting to water it since I don't water the Butia much.  It's probably been watered three or four times since planting.  I wouldn't say it's thriving but still looks pretty good considering the drought we're experiencing and the dozen or more times it's been over 100 degrees F (38 C).  It's in mostly bright shade with occasional filtered sun.

 

IMG_20200801_143657.jpg

Thank you. That is quite valuable to me as I am sure that some drought spells in Texas can be as bad or even worse than those in cooler Mediterranean climates. I forgot to mention that they are the tree form ('arborescens'). But that should not make much of a difference or am I wrong? Maybe it will even get water as I planned to plant it adjacent to a Dypsis decipiens (which I am searching for quite some time without success:badday:)  in a prime spot. That would be the sole area where I could imagine to install drip irrigation.

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Swolte

Hi LivistonaFan, my experience is similar to that of Fusca. Mine are in a non-irrigated spot although I do hand water them when we're hitting the triple digits or a dry period. I ordered mine two years ago from Junglemusic and I supposedly have the trunking and non-trunking variety (though the difference is still hard to see now). They don't look great but they're pushing new growth. Mind you, I applaud ANY plant that can last in my area through all 4 seasons (enormous temp swings, extreme heat, wet freezing temps, poor soil, etc....). The spot does get some direct (Texas) sun and I reckon that's not healthy. I planted a young live oak next to it for shade but these southern staples are slow to provide a canopy.

Edited by Swolte
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DoomsDave

@LivistonaFan

Cham rads are TOUGH expletives. Still agog myself. Sold some babies to another palm talker, and those poor things were dry as a bone, no problem.

They HATE the swamp, that is wet soil too long.

So, the answer to your question [expletive] yes.

Won't hurt to give a bigger pot or put in ground, but looks okay so far.

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DoomsDave
12 hours ago, Swolte said:

Hi LivistonaFan, my experience is similar to that of Fusca. Mine are in a non-irrigated spot although I do hand water them when we're hitting the triple digits or a dry period. I ordered mine two years ago from Junglemusic and I supposedly have the trunking and non-trunking variety (though the difference is still hard to see now). They don't look great but they're pushing new growth. Mind you, I applaud ANY plant that can last in my area through all 4 seasons (enormous temp swings, extreme heat, wet freezing temps, poor soil, etc....). The spot does get some direct (Texas) sun and I reckon that's not healthy. I planted a young live oak next to it for shade but these southern staples are slow to provide a canopy.

Post pictures of your rads

we’ll be able to tell what kind they are especially viewed near their bases

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Laaz

They do best with good watering but well draining soil.

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Swolte

Here's my clump of rads. They don't look great but please consider the circumstances (this feels a bit like showing cat abuse videos to teenage girls). Anyway, these were planted in early 2019 and, according to Phil, it was likely a mix of trunking and non-trunking. It was 4 plants in total (3 to the left and one to the right). Fruited that same year so it may be an mixed sex party. The observant eye may notice some shoots coming up at the bottom right.

CR1.jpg

CR2.jpg

Edited by Swolte

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