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jb1336

Large loquat in zone 7b

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jb1336

Was doing landscaping and saw this loquat tree thriving pretty well. 

EF6A14E6-BE5F-4E6F-ABE7-C145463A85E7.jpeg

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Fusca

I wonder if that is a fruitless variant.  If not that would be a ton of fruit to deal with!  I almost bought my first house in Snellville, but ended up buying on the opposite side of the city near Six Flags in Lithia Springs instead.

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amh

very nice, Does it have a single trunk?

 

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amh
29 minutes ago, Fusca said:

I wonder if that is a fruitless variant.  If not that would be a ton of fruit to deal with!  I almost bought my first house in Snellville, but ended up buying on the opposite side of the city near Six Flags in Lithia Springs instead.

The lack of fruit is likely due to winter temperatures below 19F.

I have a decent sized one in my yard that has never shown freeze damage even in single digits, but I only get fruit with mild winters.

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Fusca
10 minutes ago, amh said:

The lack of fruit is likely due to winter temperatures below 19F.

I have a decent sized one in my yard that has never shown freeze damage even in single digits, but I only get fruit with mild winters.

Hadn't thought of that.  I've seen one not nearly as large as the one in the original post in borderline 8b/8a Nacogdoches, TX with tons of fruit not to mention ones around here and Houston.

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jb1336
20 minutes ago, amh said:

very nice, Does it have a single trunk?

 

Yes, single trunk but splits into 5 little trunks from the main one. 

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Silas_Sancona
11 minutes ago, amh said:

The lack of fruit is likely due to winter temperatures below 19F.

I have a decent sized one in my yard that has never shown freeze damage even in single digits, but I only get fruit with mild winters.

Agree, they're very tough trees.. Assuming it is still there, there used to be a Loquat of similar size growing along a creek where i used to walk my dog back in San Jose.. Particular area of town can see lows in the mid/lower 20s more often ( though not yearly ) than surrounding areas.  In a normal year, it would fruit like crazy and honestly, compared to trees i grew up around, fruit on this "wild" tree were better/sweeter.  No exact idea on age but was big enough, trunk-size wise that it was probably growing there when San Jose experienced it's last significant freeze in 1989-90.  Almaden, where i lived ..and where this tree is located, saw lows in the 18-21F range on one or two mornings that winter. There are big trees scattered around the normally colder towns of Morgan Hill and Gilroy just south of San Jose also. Know they'd fruit  because i'd see signs offering fruit for sale when driving / biking through some of those neighborhoods. 

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amh
33 minutes ago, jb1336 said:

Yes, single trunk but splits into 5 little trunks from the main one. 

That's what I figured, Its a gorgeous tree.

Do you know what is growing behind along the fence? Are they volunteer loquats?

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amh
40 minutes ago, Fusca said:

Hadn't thought of that.  I've seen one not nearly as large as the one in the original post in borderline 8b/8a Nacogdoches, TX with tons of fruit not to mention ones around here and Houston.

Rainfall and soil quality are the biggest limit to size in central Texas. I've planted seeds that take 3 to 4 years to reach fruiting size, while seed sent to Louisiana from my tree reach 10 feet in 2 years. I'm in a cold 8a micro climate, so those of you in San Antonio get fruit while I get dead flowers.

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amh
32 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Agree, they're very tough trees.. Assuming it is still there, there used to be a Loquat of similar size growing along a creek where i used to walk my dog back in San Jose.. Particular area of town can see lows in the mid/lower 20s more often ( though not yearly ) than surrounding areas.  In a normal year, it would fruit like crazy and honestly, compared to trees i grew up around, fruit on this "wild" tree were better/sweeter.  No exact idea on age but was big enough, trunk-size wise that it was probably growing there when San Jose experienced it's last significant freeze in 1989-90.  Almaden, where i lived ..and where this tree is located, saw lows in the 18-21F range on one or two mornings that winter. There are big trees scattered around the normally colder towns of Morgan Hill and Gilroy just south of San Jose also. Know they'd fruit  because i'd see signs offering fruit for sale when driving / biking through some of those neighborhoods. 

Yes, these are really tough trees, the only weakness I've found is fire blight. I think the timing of the freezes is a big factor in fruit survival.

I love stories about wild and feral fruit trees, most people walk on by instead of picking the fruit.

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Silas_Sancona
11 minutes ago, amh said:

Yes, these are really tough trees, the only weakness I've found is fire blight. I think the timing of the freezes is a big factor in fruit survival.

I love stories about wild and feral fruit trees, most people walk on by instead of picking the fruit.

Fire blight is definitely a bummer.. Wasn't a big issue out there until it started killing/disfiguring already heat/drought stressed Bradford Pears ..a bad tree choice out there anyway.. starting sometime in the mid-90's.

Finding this Loquat was kind of a surprise.. Can't tell you how often i've likely passed it when in the area over the years and never noticed the tree until out there one day w/ my dog and noticed deer walking through the area, then noticed the fruit on the tree when i approached the deer..  Wouldn't be surprised if there aren't any other seedlings growing out there since i germinated about a dozen seeds i'd saved. 

Knowing the history of that part of my old neighborhood, i'd bet it was left over from an old property that was torn down in the late 70s or 80s when that part of San Jose started to be developed. There's some other non native stuff growing where the Loquat is and you can tell the site probably had a home on it. Was looking for it on Google street view but not easy to spot where it sits -unless it was removed-  Native Oak, Walnut, Willow, and Sycamore have filled in a lot more along that section of the creek now.  If it is still there, plan on collecting/growing seed off of it again when visiting family in that part of CA.

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amh
21 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Fire blight is definitely a bummer.. Wasn't a big issue out there until it started killing/disfiguring already heat/drought stressed Bradford Pears ..a bad tree choice out there anyway.. starting sometime in the mid-90's.

Finding this Loquat was kind of a surprise.. Can't tell you how often i've likely passed it when in the area over the years and never noticed the tree until out there one day w/ my dog and noticed deer walking through the area, then noticed the fruit on the tree when i approached the deer..  Wouldn't be surprised if there aren't any other seedlings growing out there since i germinated about a dozen seeds i'd saved. 

Knowing the history of that part of my old neighborhood, i'd bet it was left over from an old property that was torn down in the late 70s or 80s when that part of San Jose started to be developed. There's some other non native stuff growing where the Loquat is and you can tell the site probably had a home on it. Was looking for it on Google street view but not easy to spot where it sits -unless it was removed-  Native Oak, Walnut, Willow, and Sycamore have filled in a lot more along that section of the creek now.  If it is still there, plan on collecting/growing seed off of it again when visiting family in that part of CA.

Hopefully its still there, but there will likely be progeny in the area as long as people haven't removed them. I find seedlings all the time, but the deer eat them before I can dig them up.

BTW, are the fruit white fleshed or the standard yellow?

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Silas_Sancona
12 minutes ago, amh said:

Hopefully its still there, but there will likely be progeny in the area as long as people haven't removed them. I find seedlings all the time, but the deer eat them before I can dig them up.

BTW, are the fruit white fleshed or the standard yellow?

Hoping so too, Admit, not my absolute favorite fruit, but definitely a nice treat, especially if they were sweet. This one was.  Fruit were Yellow.. or more yellow orange-ish to be precise.. About average sized for a Loquat.. Little smaller that fruit off another much smaller tree i'd pick fruit off every summer as a kid.

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amh
On 8/1/2020 at 4:14 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

Hoping so too, Admit, not my absolute favorite fruit, but definitely a nice treat, especially if they were sweet. This one was.  Fruit were Yellow.. or more yellow orange-ish to be precise.. About average sized for a Loquat.. Little smaller that fruit off another much smaller tree i'd pick fruit off every summer as a kid.

Not my favorite either, but they are a great evergreen tree with fragrant flowers and a wonderful snack when ripe.

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