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Tracy

I'm wondering if I am too late with the appearance of what appear to be small seeds on the megasporophylls of this Cycas thouarsii x cupida.  I'm still waiting for the male cone to mature on my male plant of the same cross.  The female plant has been giving off a pretty strong odor for close to 3 weeks which is one of the signs I would expect.  Other than my Cycas thouarsii, I don't think I have timed it right with any other Cycas pollination.  Thoughts, advice would be appreciated from someone with more experience pollinating this genus.  With my Cycas thouarsii, I used dry pollination as I had about 3 male cones to choose from and two receptive females at the same time.

20200727-BH3I0688.jpg

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freakypalmguy

Not sure about the pollination timing, But it appears to be past the window of opportunity.
 

How old is it? I have 4 that I germinated from seed about five years ago and it’s still hard to tell how they are going to look. Mine are still relatively small. I also have a thoursaii X cairnsiana that is a rocket ship and has 1.5ft off caudex but no cone yet. It’s about 10 yrs old

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Tracy
5 hours ago, freakypalmguy said:

How old is it?

I got them in 1 gallon pots with about 1" caudex and 3-4 leaves probably around 2012, and would guess they were a couple of years old at the time.  So similar in age to your thouarsii x cairnsiana.  First time on both male and female coning so my guess is that yours might be close as well.  These coned at a similar size to a pure Cycas thouarsii.  I just picked up two seeds that dropped off one of my Cycas thouarsii that have been hanging on for right at 2 years. 

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Tracy

The male still isn't ready to collect any pollen off it.  This was from the same seed batch as my female.

 

20200801-BH3I0742.jpg

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freakypalmguy

Very nice, I know my X cairnsiana has definitely picked up speed inThe last couple years,  so hopefully the X cupida will as well, they have moved along at a pretty good clip already.

 How lucky are you to have both a female and male plant. Of all my cycads I’m at about 90%/10% male to female. I can appreciate the beauty of all of the cones, but it would just be nice to be able to produce some seed from my plants. 
 

here’s a shot of the X cairnsiana 4B08F143-B549-4C49-A7EB-0F41E382812E.thumb.jpeg.9ff68cccdf61ff9e7ed215c6739087a9.jpeg27A8F27A-3252-400C-82A5-304C218694E1.thumb.jpeg.e74e5862e5e65937c4faa810ce132161.jpeg

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Tracy
On 8/2/2020 at 6:16 AM, freakypalmguy said:

Of all my cycads I’m at about 90%/10% male to female.

I seem to be running a much higher percentage of male to female with my Encephalartos, but with Cycas I'm doing closer to 50/50 with a few yet to cone for the first time.  I have often wondered if there is a higher percentage of Encephalartos that will be male versus female or if it is like with mammals where it is roughly 50/50 probability of male versus female.  I won't speculate further, but am curious what commercial growers of cycads experience.  I meant to ask George Sparkman about this but guess I never got around to it.

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Tracy
On 8/2/2020 at 6:16 AM, freakypalmguy said:

here’s a shot of the X cairnsiana 4B08F143-B549-4C49-A7EB-0F41E382812E.thumb.jpeg.9ff68cccdf61ff9e7ed215c6739087a9.jpeg

I meant to ask what the Encephalartos is to the left of your C thouarsii x cairnsiana (paucidentatus?).  Looks like the x cairnsiana has shorter leaves that go more horizontal than the C thouarsii x cupida which tends to hold them more upright.  I like the look of it, as it also shows off the blue leaflet tops better.  As my x cupida get larger, the undersides of the leaves dominate one's color impression and they are more green, showing less of the blue tints than the tops of the leaflets.

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freakypalmguy
On 8/3/2020 at 8:12 AM, Tracy said:

I seem to be running a much higher percentage of male to female with my Encephalartos, but with Cycas I'm doing closer to 50/50 with a few yet to cone for the first time.  I have often wondered if there is a higher percentage of Encephalartos that will be male versus female or if it is like with mammals where it is roughly 50/50 probability of male versus female.  I won't speculate further, but am curious what commercial growers of cycads experience.  I meant to ask George Sparkman about this but guess I never got around to it.

George will definitely be missed, he was a good man and wealth of knowledge. 
 

I was told once, and I think it might have been from George, that you need to have at least 5 of any given species to give yourself a chance at having a female, and still no guarantee. 
 

To the left is an E. transvenosus, it hasn’t coned yet, but I’m waiting patiently. 

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