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ahosey01

Driest Towns in Hawaii

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ahosey01

I had asked a question in this board a couple days ago about the warmest deserts in the United States.  Someone pointed out to me that the warmest deserts in the United States are probably some of the arid portions of Hawaii.  Are there any towns in Hawaii (or portions of towns) in a desert climate?  I had no idea any portions of Hawaii were arid, much less desert-y.

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WaianaeCrider

If your definition of a desert is "less than 20 inches of rain a year" then the west COASTS of many of the Hawaiian Islands are deserts.  I'm about 3 miles from the ocean in a valley at an elevation of approx 380 feet.  Yup, less than 20" in an average year.  Last year 25.07" total.  Heaviest was in Oct. with almost 5.5" and 4.3" came in ONE DAY.  The rest of the month was pretty dry.  But as I've said before although we get little rain we do have a high humidity being surrounded by the ocean.  Average here is about 66% so we can grow just about anything as long as we manage the water applied.

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ahosey01
5 minutes ago, WaianaeCrider said:

If your definition of a desert is "less than 20 inches of rain a year" then the west COASTS of many of the Hawaiian Islands are deserts.  I'm about 3 miles from the ocean in a valley at an elevation of approx 380 feet.  Yup, less than 20" in an average year.  Last year 25.07" total.  Heaviest was in Oct. with almost 5.5" and 4.3" came in ONE DAY.  The rest of the month was pretty dry.  But as I've said before although we get little rain we do have a high humidity being surrounded by the ocean.  Average here is about 66% so we can grow just about anything as long as we manage the water applied.

Do you ever run into Max Holloway at the grocery store?

This is interesting.  I was thinking that deserts are less than 10 inches and semi-deserts less than 20.  Is this the driest place in Hawaii?  Or are there others that are drier?

Seems like with little natural precipitation, moderated temperatures and high humidity you really could grow almost anything you wanted.

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Dypsisdean

This should help answer your question. I live where it rains 60+ inches average per year - but almost 100 inches already this year. 10 mins down the hill it rains 15.

Precip_1485px_1100_723_75_s.jpeg

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ahosey01

So this little area that I circled in blue is the real "desert" portion of Hawaii?

 

image.thumb.png.bc36b3022459d1e55582aca91d6c6e7a.png

 

This is real interesting to me.  Having never been I just pictured the whole place as a giant rainforest.

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WaianaeCrider
2 hours ago, ahosey01 said:

Do you ever run into Max Holloway at the grocery store?

This is interesting.  I was thinking that deserts are less than 10 inches and semi-deserts less than 20.  Is this the driest place in Hawaii?  Or are there others that are drier?

Seems like with little natural precipitation, moderated temperatures and high humidity you really could grow almost anything you wanted.

No I have never met him, but I have friends that have.

OK I'm in a semi-desert.  Can't say for the other islands.  The 3 miles into the valley puts me closer to the mountains that catch the rain and block if from the leeward coasts.  Extreme south end of the island in the shadow of the ko`olau mts would be very similar.

Pretty much the limitation is fruit that needs cold weather.  No apples here.  LOL

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www.dadluvsu.com
8 hours ago, ahosey01 said:

So this little area that I circled in blue is the real "desert" portion of Hawaii?

 

image.thumb.png.bc36b3022459d1e55582aca91d6c6e7a.png

 

This is real interesting to me.  Having never been I just pictured the whole place as a giant rainforest.

It is practically lifeless land down by the coast in your blue square.  Practically no plants have grown there for thousands of years; just not enough water.  I recall about 5-6 years ago the grounds keeper mentioned only measuring 3” of rain for the year in early winter.  Several popular vacation spots wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for a miraculous  irrigation network; imagine driving for miles of black lava and the all of a sudden green gold courses.  Odd fact, I learned recently that the birds in the area have learned to frequent the underside of parked cars to drink the condensation of auto a/c systems.  
 

B40042BB-8072-4969-980C-DE1F7D91424A.png

B41AF371-2208-41EE-91DC-4E03522AFC7B.png

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PalmTreeDude
19 hours ago, Dypsisdean said:

This should help answer your question. I live where it rains 60+ inches average per year - but almost 100 inches already this year. 10 mins down the hill it rains 15.

Precip_1485px_1100_723_75_s.jpeg

Wow, that’s a good map. No wonder so many palm species can grow in Hawaii. 

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ahosey01

This is ridiculously interesting to me.

I am thinking I should visit.  I have a plan to purchase a second home in the medium-term future.  Maybe this would be a good spot to do it.  Might require a little extra saving though with those home prices.

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