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Brad Mondel

Finally got them in the ground!

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Brad Mondel

After all of these years I finally got to buy a house with over half an acre and now almost all of the palms are planted.

I am in zone 8a South Carolina above the fall line!

It is a work in progress so don't judge. :)

 

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Edited by Brad Mondel
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Brad Mondel

My largest Sabal palmetto 'Lisa':

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20200705_193443.jpg

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

Nice start Brad !!! Do you see yourself splurging on any specimen sized palms. What other palms you wanting to install some day ? Definitely keep us posted =) 

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Fusca

Your patience is paying off!  Very nice!  Mulch is your friend with that red clay!

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Brad Mondel
44 minutes ago, OC2Texaspalmlvr said:

Nice start Brad !!! Do you see yourself splurging on any specimen sized palms. What other palms you wanting to install some day ? Definitely keep us posted =) 

I plan on getting some large palmettos to install eventually, probably after I get the lawn going nicely!

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OC2Texaspalmlvr
7 minutes ago, Brad Mondel said:

I plan on getting some large palmettos to install eventually, probably after I get the lawn going nicely!

you gonna try any Mules ? Any protection on the property besides the house ? 

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yabazid

Nice plantings @Brad Mondel
we are zone 8a buddies now lol. That red clay we got here sucks doesn’t it. Good luck and I will keep up with what you got. 

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Brad Mondel
20 minutes ago, OC2Texaspalmlvr said:

you gonna try any Mules ? Any protection on the property besides the house ? 

I would like to try a mule on the south side of the house, or near my parking pad. I am on a cul-de-sac which means I'm  surrounded by blacktop and my parking pad as well is concrete. Perhaps my spot will be warmer than usual with all of this. I can't wait to see the different microclimates this coming winter! 

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Brad Mondel
20 minutes ago, yabazid said:

Nice plantings @Brad Mondel
we are zone 8a buddies now lol. That red clay we got here sucks doesn’t it. Good luck and I will keep up with what you got. 

Yes! The clay is hard to dig in and the grass has a hard time getting established. I amend with pine bark and add lots of mulch. Where are you located? I am in Anderson.

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PalmatierMeg

Congrats on the new property, Brad. Keep us updated on your planned palm paradise.

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Allen

Looking good!

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kinzyjr

@Brad Mondel Congrats on the new digs and enjoy the landscaping journey!  It will be refreshing to see the blend of temperate plants and palms you're able to put together on half an acre.

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Manalto

I'm joining the others in congratulating you on your new place with room to try out all sorts of things in the garden. Hang on to those pictures; in a few years when you get impatient with how slowly things are progressing, they will cheer you up.  Looking forward to seeing what develops in your little slice of 8a. Did I see a butia?

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Chester B

Looking good.  In 3 years time it won't be recognizable, and it's always nice to document "the beginning".

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Brad Mondel
2 hours ago, Manalto said:

I'm joining the others in congratulating you on your new place with room to try out all sorts of things in the garden. Hang on to those pictures; in a few years when you get impatient with how slowly things are progressing, they will cheer you up.  Looking forward to seeing what develops in your little slice of 8a. Did I see a butia?

Thanks everyone!

And yes, I have several Butias as they are my favorite palm. There's many around town that are huge so they do great here.

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Turtlesteve

Way to go!  Now we just gotta wait a few years and we’ll all have top notch palm gardens.

If you still know how many things you’ve planted, it’s not enough yet.

Edited by Turtlesteve
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James760

Now the fun starts! Congratulations :greenthumb:

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yabazid
15 hours ago, Brad Mondel said:

Yes! The clay is hard to dig in and the grass has a hard time getting established. I amend with pine bark and add lots of mulch. Where are you located? I am in Anderson.

Yea I am in anderson as well. 
trachys do very well here. Butias need to be protected for a couple of years but after they establish they grow like crazy. They can get some damage but always recover with lots of care. Sabal palmettos grow very well even when planted out at 5G. There’s many examples of big transplants from Florida palmettos that grow just fine. did you see the ones next to the medical lab ;)

You should definitely try some Jubaea hybrids, as I am growing few and now they are picking up lots of speed :shaka-2:

 

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Brad Mondel
13 hours ago, yabazid said:

Yea I am in anderson as well. 
trachys do very well here. Butias need to be protected for a couple of years but after they establish they grow like crazy. They can get some damage but always recover with lots of care. Sabal palmettos grow very well even when planted out at 5G. There’s many examples of big transplants from Florida palmettos that grow just fine. did you see the ones next to the medical lab ;)

You should definitely try some Jubaea hybrids, as I am growing few and now they are picking up lots of speed :shaka-2:

 

Yes! Those are beautiful and the one at the car wash. I saw a massive Butia at a hotel nearby. Larger than any other I've seen.

 

I have one small Jubaea x Butia F2 hybrid in a pot but it is very slowwww.

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Fusca
1 minute ago, Brad Mondel said:

Yes! Those are beautiful and the one at the car wash. I saw a massive Butia at a hotel nearby. Larger than any other I've seen.

 

I have one small Jubaea x Butia F2 hybrid in a pot but it is very slowwww.

Yes, the F2 hybrids don't have much hybrid vigor.  :unsure:  My BxJ F2 looks and grows just like a regular Butia and I'm starting to wonder if it isn't just a Butia.

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Turtlesteve
44 minutes ago, Fusca said:

Yes, the F2 hybrids don't have much hybrid vigor.  :unsure:  My BxJ F2 looks and grows just like a regular Butia and I'm starting to wonder if it isn't just a Butia.

I think that many palms being interpreted as F2 hybrids may in fact be back crosses with Butia.  However, real F2 hybrids should be theoretically more variable than F1 hybrids as well.

Edited by Turtlesteve

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Brad Mondel

Whatever mine is it is extremely slow, maybe one leaf a year? Is that normal?

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Turtlesteve
1 hour ago, Brad Mondel said:

Whatever mine is it is extremely slow, maybe one leaf a year? Is that normal?

Faster than mine, since I killed them all.   I might get a Jubaea or JxB/BxJ hybrid to take eventually, but man there’s gonna be a trail of death and tears to get there.  50% or more Jubaea lineage might as well be the kiss of death.

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Brad Mondel
32 minutes ago, Turtlesteve said:

Faster than mine, since I killed them all.   I might get a Jubaea or JxB/BxJ hybrid to take eventually, but man there’s gonna be a trail of death and tears to get there.  50% or more Jubaea lineage might as well be the kiss of death.

I guess keeping mine in the greenhouse during the winter has kept it from dying. I did lose a sibling to this one that is still clinging on.

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Fusca
4 hours ago, Turtlesteve said:

I think that many palms being interpreted as F2 hybrids may in fact be back crosses with Butia.  However, real F2 hybrids should be theoretically more variable than F1 hybrids as well.

I remember @Darold Petty posted a quote from a palm publication earlier this year regarding F2 hybrids, but I can't find it.  Maybe he could post it again.  If I remember correctly "real" F2 that are not back crossed are not the same as the F1 hybrid parent but have characteristics of either one of the parents and a small amount of hybrid vigor.  Back crosses of, for example, BxJ with Butia would show mostly Butia traits I suppose.

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Darold Petty

Fusca, you have the gist of the situation.    My comment was to a person who assumed that F2 from the F1 'Foxy Lady' would be the same.  The F2 is not reliable to show F1 characteristics, and often more resemble the grandparent species, including the absence of the F1 hybrid vigor.  This is from Wikipedia, primarily  the paragraph 'Disadvantages'.    :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F1_hybrid

(Wish I could grow a Foxy Lady, but too cold here! )   :D 

 

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yabazid
13 hours ago, Brad Mondel said:

Yes! Those are beautiful and the one at the car wash. I saw a massive Butia at a hotel nearby. Larger than any other I've seen.

 

I have one small Jubaea x Butia F2 hybrid in a pot but it is very slowwww.

I have 3 hybrids. BJxB (the fastest growth overall), BJxJ (just getting fatter but throwing fronds all over now), JxB (the slowest and getting fatter but very Jubaea looking). 

10 hours ago, Brad Mondel said:

Whatever mine is it is extremely slow, maybe one leaf a year? Is that normal?

No not normal. Even my slowest (JxB) is throwing 3-4 fronds per season. 

8 hours ago, Brad Mondel said:

I guess keeping mine in the greenhouse during the winter has kept it from dying. I did lose a sibling to this one that is still clinging on.

I recommend keeping them exposed but with clear over head protection from precipitation (rain/snow). At least that’s what I did with them in the pots and they were completely hardy to the winter here. Now it’s their 5th year in the ground and no protection since then. 

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Fusca
21 hours ago, Darold Petty said:

Fusca, you have the gist of the situation.    My comment was to a person who assumed that F2 from the F1 'Foxy Lady' would be the same.  The F2 is not reliable to show F1 characteristics, and often more resemble the grandparent species, including the absence of the F1 hybrid vigor.  This is from Wikipedia, primarily  the paragraph 'Disadvantages'.    :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F1_hybrid

(Wish I could grow a Foxy Lady, but too cold here! )   :D 

 

Thanks Darold!  Wikipedia isn't exactly a palm publication as I mentioned, but at least I remembered you posting something helpful!  I also had the same misconception regarding F2 hybrids so that read was certainly good info to me!  Wish I could grow a Foxy Lady also!

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Laaz

Looking good Brad. It will be interesting to see what survives if we get another arctic blast like Jan. 2018. All of my mules had spear pull here & we only dropped to 16F. Stan Mckenzie said he dropped to 8F in Lake City which is south of I-95. You must have been colder than that.

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Brad Mondel
13 hours ago, Laaz said:

Looking good Brad. It will be interesting to see what survives if we get another arctic blast like Jan. 2018. All of my mules had spear pull here & we only dropped to 16F. Stan Mckenzie said he dropped to 8F in Lake City which is south of I-95. You must have been colder than that.

According to records the lowest we saw that Jan was 10F.

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Brad Mondel

20200709_215801.thumb.jpg.4ee01b258bd96c3f39f8b84936b5f02e.jpg

Another Butia that survived crown rot a few years ago.

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Brad Mondel
On 7/8/2020 at 6:41 AM, yabazid said:

I have 3 hybrids. BJxB (the fastest growth overall), BJxJ (just getting fatter but throwing fronds all over now), JxB (the slowest and getting fatter but very Jubaea looking). 

No not normal. Even my slowest (JxB) is throwing 3-4 fronds per season. 

I recommend keeping them exposed but with clear over head protection from precipitation (rain/snow). At least that’s what I did with them in the pots and they were completely hardy to the winter here. Now it’s their 5th year in the ground and no protection since then. 

Mine is yellowing so perhaps it needs more fert.

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Brad Mondel

Everything has grown a lot this summer and I also got my first inforescence on a Butia!

 

20201121_113906.thumb.jpg.3e00267c2f722296e33dd67b6587a2b2.jpg20201108_172735.thumb.jpg.ae7d7cbd38885ac0db69c30c4aa81bfb.jpg

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IRQVET

Congrads on escaping California (resent transplant myself) from the SF Bay Area, your new property looks awesome. Keep up posted on your progress, designing your landscape is fun isn't it. 

Edited by IRQVET

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climate change virginia

nice palms

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