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clevelandtropicsmaybe

Potting Queen palm seedlings?

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clevelandtropicsmaybe

So I just dug up 2 queen palm seedlings here in north Florida and plan on taking them back to ohio. Does anyone think that these ones have a chance of surviving inside during the winter? image.thumb.jpg.42e77d53ab55f465f23d0dbf11a71d83.jpg

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oasis371

I grow Queen Palms in the North (NJ/Zone 7), but don't overwinter in the house..., too big.  Yes, you should be able to overwinter them in the house in Ohio, but as my previous sentence suggests..., Queens get TALL and fast.  Mine spend mid March to December 1st outside in full/unobstructed southern exposure, then go into a loft garage along with all the other hardier subtropicals.  It's relatively cold but frost free in my garage.

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clevelandtropicsmaybe

I assumed that they were fast growers considering how much they grow like a weed here, but I’m up for another challenge after the coconut. 

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JLM

Looks like you might have a few years of overwintering inside. But as said above they grow fast so maybe only 2-4 years left.

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clevelandtropicsmaybe

Ok I’ll try and keep them in smaller pots so that they don’t grow as fast. 

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Rickybobby

I have a ton of queens. In pots. Good drainage kee soil moist and give some artificial light and they will grow like weeds for you 

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Rickybobby
On 7/4/2020 at 11:33 AM, clevelandtropicsmaybe said:

Ok I’ll try and keep them in smaller pots so that they don’t grow as fast. 

Smaller pot doesn’t mean it will grow slower it’s opposite good drainage and healthy roots will grow faster 

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DoomsDave

@clevelandtropicsmaybe, what @Rickybobby said.

They should be fine in your house with reasonable care.

Of course, with time they'll outgrow the indoors, but it will be a while, so enjoy in the meantime. One of the things that makes queens good as a northern house plant is they will take dry heat well. They'll also take lower indoor temps than coconuts have to have (as you found).

Let us know how it goes!

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