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Coasta

Royal palm newer frond appears to be getting burned

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Coasta

Hello all! 

It's my  first summer with my Royal here in arizona and I noticed over the last few days that the second newest frond is already looking a little toasty. I water heavily three to 4 times a day and when I check the dirt, it is not dried out.  

I also give it arizonas best fertlizer once a month. 

Any suggestions or will it adapt over time. 

Please see below, its the frond on the right :).

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palmsOrl

If it is truly getting enough water (and it should be from a good soaking 3-4 times per day, even in the Southern AZ summer) my guess would be that the conbination of the intense UV radiation and the extreme heat are causing the tips of the leaflets to desiccate and there might be little you can do about it.  Your palm may tend to end up looking a bit ratty for part or much of the year due to the arid, hot summer climate.

More optimistically, with continued good care, your palm may adapt to the conditions and you may get little to no burn on the new leaves from the dry heat in the coming years.

Out of curiousity, what kind of soil is your royal planted in?  Is it in desert sand (or whatever the local soil is) or did you ammend the soil around the rootball with potting soil, or other materials before planting?

Regarding fertilizer, I know that in Florida I would give the palm a quality time-release fertilizer (Nutricote is my favorite, Dynamite brand at Lowes or HD) that comes in pellets twice per year.  Due to your vastly different rainfall pattern and amount of rainfall in your location, however, the best strategy might be totally different, so I will wait for some locals to chime in on fertilizer recommendations.

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Coasta

Hi PalmsOr. Thank you for responding, I really appreciate it. I have it planted in 100 percent cactus/palm mix. I am hoping it gets used to it as I planted it in the Eastern exposure where it gets some afternoon protection. 

This wouldn't be caused by a feetlizer deficiency would it? I do feed it maganese as well as the basic palm fertliziers. 

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aztropic

Totally normal...Should be even more burned than that! We've already had 9 days this year of 110F or higher with relative humidity in the single digits.While a lot of rare palms will (grow/survive) in Arizona,they will NEVER look as nice as the same species growing in CA or FL. (areas with lower summer temps and higher humidity) Just something we have to live with when growing palms not really suited to our harsh climate.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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NickJames

Hi, yes I think that’s normal. Didn’t you plant around the same time as me? I can’t remember. 
 

I planted four royals back in March here in Daytona Beach, FL. We were going through an unusually dry/hot period with 90 degree days but none of the typical summer humidity. We didn’t get rain for nearly two months (EXTREMELY UNUSUAL). 
 

All the outer leaflets burned like yours. Some even entirely burned. 
 

Now that we are up to 11 inches of rain for this month, and the humidity is now insane, it has produced Vibrantly green new growth and is rapidly growing. 
 

I have been Feeding it MicroLife ultimate fertilizer from amazon. It seems to like it. My soil here is hard to describe with some areas sandy and some areas clay. In general, the soil here is poor for gardening and lacks nutrients and acidity. 

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Coasta

Thanks so much Aztropic l, well if its supposed to be more burned then that, I am pretty lucky lol. 

 

@nick great memorie! Yes I planted my royal back in March. :). Its currently getting chunky more than growing fronds. So far it has only opened a frond and a half. How is yours? 

 

20200628_193148.jpg

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James B

Not as dry or hot here where I am but we do get up to 113 in summer. That said we have had the coolest summer I’ve experience since moving to Rancho Cucamonga. But Royals love the heat and while you are getting some rip burn that’s something to be expected considering your high temps and low humidity. Just make sure to water it every day and fertilize every 6 weeks and you will have a monster one day.

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sonoranfans

its an achievement to grow a royal in arizona.  Its a water loving palm in the most dessicating environment.  Leaflet tips will dry in the desert, even bizzies can get a little tip dry in the 110F 5-9% humidity weather in spring.  I remember running around with a hose and even turning on big sprinklers to cool the yard down at the end of the day.  Many palms need to be closely watched for excessive dessication/burn.  IF I were growing a royal there I'd find an area that didnt see western sun(hottest of the day), it would need to be shaded or shade trees installed to block that sun.  Trunks split and crack from taht kind of sun.  Then I would have other palms nearby, they also shade root areas at different times of the day.  If th epalms is already in I would shade the root areas and crown(if possible) with netting while it establishes roots.  Once the roots are established(2yrs?), I remove it.  Good luck growing one of the biggest wet loving palms in the most dessicating state in the US!

 

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NickJames
16 hours ago, Coasta said:

Thanks so much Aztropic l, well if its supposed to be more burned then that, I am pretty lucky lol. 

 

@nick great memorie! Yes I planted my royal back in March. :). Its currently getting chunky more than growing fronds. So far it has only opened a frond and a half. How is yours? 

 

20200628_193148.jpg

I’m about on track with you. We went from really hot and dry when I planted it (not ideal) to then Unusually cool and dry in May (also weird) so it really hasn’t picked up speed until June. The rain/humidity/hot nights started all at once so I’m sure it’s loving it now. 
 

I do notice the gray/brown trunks Are larger than thought. There are a lot of old leaf bases still on the tree (from leaflets manually trimmed off at nursery) that are obscuring the trunk. They’re finally starting to loosen and fall off with the trunk rapid growth. If you saw another recent post of mine, I had water leaking out after the 3 inch rain event. It appears the hairline crack the water was leaking from really contracted (yay!). It was a cosmetic thing only really anyways. 

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Coasta
On 7/1/2020 at 5:50 AM, sonoranfans said:

its an achievement to grow a royal in arizona.  Its a water loving palm in the most dessicating environment.  Leaflet tips will dry in the desert, even bizzies can get a little tip dry in the 110F 5-9% humidity weather in spring.  I remember running around with a hose and even turning on big sprinklers to cool the yard down at the end of the day.  Many palms need to be closely watched for excessive dessication/burn.  IF I were growing a royal there I'd find an area that didnt see western sun(hottest of the day), it would need to be shaded or shade trees installed to block that sun.  Trunks split and crack from taht kind of sun.  Then I would have other palms nearby, they also shade root areas at different times of the day.  If th epalms is already in I would shade the root areas and crown(if possible) with netting while it establishes roots.  Once the roots are established(2yrs?), I remove it.  Good luck growing one of the biggest wet loving palms in the most dessicating state in the US!

 

Thanks Sonoranfans! I actually do have it planted in 100 percent cactus/palms soil although with the size these get i am wondering if i should dig out a bigger hole or if it is too late to dig out. Bigger hole since its been in tbr ground since March.  I also have it planted between two house one the east side exposure and the house west of the royal next to mine is a two story so I am hoping that prevents any cracking and less dry fronds :). 

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Coasta
On 7/1/2020 at 7:04 AM, NickJames said:

I’m about on track with you. We went from really hot and dry when I planted it (not ideal) to then Unusually cool and dry in May (also weird) so it really hasn’t picked up speed until June. The rain/humidity/hot nights started all at once so I’m sure it’s loving it now. 
 

I do notice the gray/brown trunks Are larger than thought. There are a lot of old leaf bases still on the tree (from leaflets manually trimmed off at nursery) that are obscuring the trunk. They’re finally starting to loosen and fall off with the trunk rapid growth. If you saw another recent post of mine, I had water leaking out after the 3 inch rain event. It appears the hairline crack the water was leaking from really contracted (yay!). It was a cosmetic thing only really anyways. 

That is amazing Nicknames! I would love to see a photo of your Royals trunk  if you have any!

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Coasta
On 6/30/2020 at 8:44 PM, James B said:

Not as dry or hot here where I am but we do get up to 113 in summer. That said we have had the coolest summer I’ve experience since moving to Rancho Cucamonga. But Royals love the heat and while you are getting some rip burn that’s something to be expected considering your high temps and low humidity. Just make sure to water it every day and fertilize every 6 weeks and you will have a monster one day.

Thanks so much James!! 

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NickJames
14 hours ago, Coasta said:

That is amazing Nicknames! I would love to see a photo of your Royals trunk  if you have any!

 

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Coasta
10 minutes ago, NickJames said:

 

A92FD5B2-A278-4056-96A6-7750A6BB85CC.jpeg

EA78672C-4A2F-46A3-BFC5-405E6102B89B.jpeg

5D0856DA-94BE-489C-A8FA-15A7B40A8350.jpeg

8F72F5BB-CA7E-4643-AEAD-C933F4EFC1C3.jpeg

C3327B04-EAB4-42BC-AEA2-1988904A4F39.jpeg

EB276738-6F30-4BDA-86C0-7D6549E9BE92.jpeg

65DCBB62-EC91-4302-BA6A-09A2574AF494.jpeg

5A836FFC-6717-46C8-A72B-28D362F98F9F.jpeg

Thanks Nickjames! Nice photos of all your royals. I look forward to mine getting some trunk. 

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DoomsDave
On 6/30/2020 at 1:27 PM, Coasta said:

Hi PalmsOr. Thank you for responding, I really appreciate it. I have it planted in 100 percent cactus/palm mix. I am hoping it gets used to it as I planted it in the Eastern exposure where it gets some afternoon protection. 

This wouldn't be caused by a feetlizer deficiency would it? I do feed it maganese as well as the basic palm fertliziers. 

PRAISES TO YOU FOR BEING A GOOD PALM PARENT!

You obviously went to a lot of trouble to do the right thing by your palm.

But, I think your soil is a problem.

If you've planted your palm in a hole that's basically a pot in the ground filled with the soil you describe, it will drain too fast. Royals are swamp things that like lots of water. As time goes by, the humus that there is will rot out and you'll be left with sand and vermiculite. It will also tend to tip over after a while.

How long have you had it there?

If planted recently (this spring?), I'd mix potting soil with your native dirt and back fill the hole and replant the palm in that mixture. If it's been a while, I'd keep working in - gently - a mixture that I describe.

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Coasta
27 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

PRAISES TO YOU FOR BEING A GOOD PALM PARENT!

You obviously went to a lot of trouble to do the right thing by your palm.

But, I think your soil is a problem.

If you've planted your palm in a hole that's basically a pot in the ground filled with the soil you describe, it will drain too fast. Royals are swamp things that like lots of water. As time goes by, the humus that there is will rot out and you'll be left with sand and vermiculite. It will also tend to tip over after a while.

How long have you had it there?

If planted recently (this spring?), I'd mix potting soil with your native dirt and back fill the hole and replant the palm in that mixture. If it's been a while, I'd keep working in - gently - a mixture that I describe.

Hey DoomsDave!

It's funny you mention that today because I just finished working on making the hole bigger in preparation for it to get larger and for there still to be space for me to water and for it to drain quickly. 

Before starting this project today I noticed it was pretty firm in the dirt and wasn't really moving. 

As I was removing some of the native soil, I noticed there is still some clay soil in between where I started to make the hole wider and the root system. I didn't dig as deep as the main roots either and left that clay soil. Am I in trouble. :0. 

I used black and gold cactus mix which I have used in the past and it has always done well.

 

Also I do notice that it is always wet as i water it three or 4 times a day with the hose and the remainder goes off into the clay soil. 

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Edited by Coasta
Forgot something
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DoomsDave

Okay, looks like you're all right.

Clay is great for them.

Just mucho agua.

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DoomsDave

They're good in Palm Springs, and Saudi Arabia. Among many other places.

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Coasta
1 minute ago, DoomsDave said:

Okay, looks like you're all right.

Clay is great for them.

Just mucho agua.

Will the palm eventually grow roots into the clay soil about 15 inches away from its current trunk and should i be worried about it falling over. Ahh! Its tough being a palm parent. 

Also would it be fine to back fill the rest of the hole with the black and gold? 

 

Thanks DoomsDave!

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DoomsDave

If yours gets like mine, won't mean a thing, though you might want to top-dress later.

They get MASSIVE. I MEAN, YOWZA,

Stuck on caps for emphasis.

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Coasta
11 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

If yours gets like mine, won't mean a thing, though you might want to top-dress later.

They get MASSIVE. I MEAN, YOWZA,

Stuck on caps for emphasis.

Do you think the roots will eventually grow into the clay soil which is about 15 or 16 inches from the trunk? 

I look forward to seeing it grow :). 

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DoomsDave
8 minutes ago, Coasta said:

Do you think the roots will eventually grow into the clay soil which is about 15 or 16 inches from the trunk? 

I look forward to seeing it grow :). 

I think it will; with time, make the basin really big, like 6 feet across; all the way to the wall.

I really had no clue how massive they'd get and how quickly.

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Coasta
4 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

I think it will; with time, make the basin really big, like 6 feet across; all the way to the wall.

Thanks DoomsDave!! You rock :)

 

I hope i didn't mess it by making the hole bigger.

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DoomsDave
2 minutes ago, Coasta said:

Thanks DoomsDave!! You rock :)

 

I hope i didn't mess it by making the hole bigger.

I think you're good to go. I wish you could see the Little Rascals first hand.

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Coasta
2 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

I think you're good to go. I wish you could see the Little Rascals first hand.

Oh! While we are on the topic, I am thinking about the future. Currently the crown shift is about 5 feet from my home/roof and almost 9  feet from the neighbors roof.  

Do you think that will be fine in the future as the fronds fall? 

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DoomsDave
3 hours ago, Coasta said:

Oh! While we are on the topic, I am thinking about the future. Currently the crown shift is about 5 feet from my home/roof and almost 9  feet from the neighbors roof.  

Do you think that will be fine in the future as the fronds fall? 

Leaves don't usually hurt roofs as much as plants, cars, trucks, and people underneath. If you can, I'd find a way to move it into the center of your yard, to minimize. But, not foolproof, and you'll get some lovely years for a while.

Butch is too big, I should not have put it where I did.

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