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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

Palms, Yucca, Agave, and Subtropicals in Kernserville, NC

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

This afternoon I visited the Paul J Ciener botanical garden in Kernersville, NC. There were many unexpected and impressive specimens (for the area) there, so I took a few pictures. Kernersville is in the western piedmont, sits at 1,040ft in elevation, and is zone 7b. 

*Disclaimer - I'm not the best at identifying species, so please let me know if I got any wrong. Thanks*

Agave Americana:

aa.jpg.7aaf2088312b5f59a1c61b0c2047574d.jpg

Dypsis lutescens? (not sure on this one):

cl.jpg.9b9eb244873221942a84e9e0047d7d36.jpg

 

Dasylirion wheeleri:

dw.jpg.aeccf95fdb9c9d99df29181dd42ea6fe.jpg

Yucca faxoniana? (not 100% on this one either):

yf.jpg.aca225b5a2091374032414251e61d66e.jpg

Trachycarpus fortunei:

wm.jpg.f5df962bb2cf6b3966c0fac08e27e4a6.jpg

wm2.jpg.f62ee2d231c4039477043135ed228765.jpg

Cordyline australis 'red sensation':

ca.jpg.41d7fcfd4c82e173829f1407acc6d5a6.jpg

Alocasia macrorrhizos (maybe?):

gt.jpg.f24f3f8851b35bca0f07a3d0803af9a8.jpg

No idea what this is:

ns.jpg.8860f8b73949e93c72f6af9bcf414e40.jpg

Rhapidophyllum hystrix? (I think):

rh.jpg.b5c9c398f0754ef75ce5c985f7a73415.jpg

Either yucca elata or rostrata:

yucca.jpg.9cb7764f933bea718792ccc90da89b73.jpg

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast
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TexasColdHardyPalms

That's not a faxoniana. The unknown is yucca thompsonii and next one is rostrata. 

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
1 minute ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

That's not a faxoniana. The unknown is yucca thompsonii and next one is rostrata. 

Thanks. What is the one I wrongly labeled faxoniana?

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Meangreen94z

The first one with out a trunk is not a Yucca, it appears to be Dasylirion Wheeleri. Although there are several Dasylirion that are close in appearance. They can eventually grow a trunk as well but the flowers are the obvious difference between Yucca and Dasylirion.

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Meangreen94z

First image is a Dasylirion flower, second is a typical yucca flower. Yuccas form a trunk at a much earlier age. Dasylirion grow much wider in its initial years than a yucca would. They also retain their lower leaves for a much longer duration. Sometimes what appears to be a massive bush has a trunk hidden underneath.

7A872DF5-7095-49D7-B81B-81D8C242C71D.jpeg

20E73E23-556E-44BE-BBCE-D48EA3AE1460.jpeg

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TexasColdHardyPalms

Meangreen he labeled the the dasylirion correctly. The one below it he labeled faxoniana is wrong. It's a gloriosa or aloifolia or flaccida. I dont grow any of those or am knowledgeable enough to ID them.

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Takil

 The " Yucca faxoniana ??" is very probably  a Furcraea bedinghausi

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
On 6/24/2020 at 10:34 PM, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Meangreen he labeled the the dasylirion correctly. The one below it he labeled faxoniana is wrong. It's a gloriosa or aloifolia or flaccida. I dont grow any of those or am knowledgeable enough to ID them.

After doing a little research, I believe @Takil was right in that it is a Furcraea bedinghausi. Next time I’m there I’ll make sure to ask one of the gardeners about it

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast
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Silas_Sancona
16 minutes ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

After doing a little research, I believe @Takil was right in that it is a Furcraea bedinghausi. Next time I’m there I’ll make sure to ask one of the gardeners about it

I'd been glaring at that picture over and over since you posted it and Furcraea ..something.. kept coming to mind..  Makes sense.. Def. not any Yucca or Dasylirion i've ever observed. Agave something or other came to mind as well, but, again, looks are off.. Regardless, Nice specimen.   Curious to hear how long the garden has had it when you get an opportunity to talk w/ the curator..

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

I'd been glaring at that picture over and over since you posted it and Furcraea ..something.. kept coming to mind..  Makes sense.. Def. not any Yucca or Dasylirion i've ever observed. Agave something or other came to mind as well, but, again, looks are off.. Regardless, Nice specimen.   Curious to hear how long the garden has had it when you get an opportunity to talk w/ the curator..

I’ll make sure to report back when I do

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knikfar

I love the cordylines but didn't think they'd be hardy here in Raleigh. We're just on the 7b side of 8a, and about 700' lower in elevation than Kernersville. 

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
49 minutes ago, knikfar said:

I love the cordylines but didn't think they'd be hardy here in Raleigh. We're just on the 7b side of 8a, and about 700' lower in elevation than Kernersville. 

I’ve got one in my yard here just north of Greensboro, I’ll have to see how long it lives. I’d bet the one at the gardens is given some sort of protection during the winter. 

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Silas_Sancona
34 minutes ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

I’ve got one in my yard here just north of Greensboro, I’ll have to see how long it lives. I’d bet the one at the gardens is given some sort of protection during the winter. 

Will also be interested to see how these do both for you, and in the garden's collection.. Quite stunning plants once they get older.. While winters don't get nearly as cold back in San Jose as they can there, the sight of any of the larger Cordylines was rare until ..maybe the late 80s / early-mid 90s?  < At least when i'd started noticing them in landscapes on my side of town >  Still not all that common in landscapes there but ones that have been around for awhile are spectacular..

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
2 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Will also be interested to see how these do both for you, and in the garden's collection.. Quite stunning plants once they get older.. While winters don't get nearly as cold back in San Jose as they can there, the sight of any of the larger Cordylines was rare until ..maybe the late 80s / early-mid 90s?  < At least when i'd started noticing them in landscapes on my side of town >  Still not all that common in landscapes there but ones that have been around for awhile are spectacular..

I’ve also always thought the mature specimens are gorgeous. I know they grow a lot of them in Southern England, they call them Cornish palms there I believe.

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Chester B

Cordylines are zone 9A plants, but root hardy to at least 8.  They get to a decent size here as most winters are mile enough but and then a cold winter will come along and knock them back to almost the ground.  Often times they'll come back multiheaded.  It isn't until you get to the coast (Zone 9a and 9B) that you see mature ones.

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
21 hours ago, Chester B said:

Cordylines are zone 9A plants, but root hardy to at least 8.  They get to a decent size here as most winters are mile enough but and then a cold winter will come along and knock them back to almost the ground.  Often times they'll come back multiheaded.  It isn't until you get to the coast (Zone 9a and 9B) that you see mature ones.

Good to know

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast

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