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Kris

Any pictures on CIDP

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iamjv

One with a small crown in Miami.... Jv

post-362-1236898762_thumb.jpg

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Kris

Dear Friends :)

Thanks a lot for the visuals...

here are few intreasting stills from our member bubba.

here is a still of a villa or mansion,where the mature CIDP's looks fabulous ! :drool:

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Here is a another stills,where one could compare a weak looking palm in reference to a size of a CIDP (i.e comparative still) :mrlooney:

post-108-1237477667_thumb.jpg

Thanks & Love,

Kris :)

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Jeff in St Pete

A nice one from California

P3080060.jpg

And a few more

P3080063-1.jpg

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Kris
Here is some pennance:

PictureNumerousPalmsandFoot2062.jpg

AND:

PictureNumerousPalmsandFoot2063.jpg

.

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Kris
Yeah, I was thinking of Kris when I saw this very old Phoenix canariensis in an old Point Loma garden recently:

DSC_0151.jpg

.

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Kris
A few weeks ago these landmark CIDP's were trimmed, so I snapped a pic.

VeteranCIDP.jpg

.

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Dalmatino

Korcula, Croatia

GroteFoto-Q88XRJJ8.jpg

Split Boulevard, Croatia

GroteFoto-BSOSLEMX.jpg

Again Split Boulevard, Croatia

GroteFoto-FEWJPQDJ.jpg

These stills were made in 2007 when i visited my fatherland for the last time.

One year ago i became father (the only year i didnt visit croatia in my life) and this year i will bring my sun with me to enjoy this great country.

Cheers!

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Dalmatino

My tiny little CIPD in the netherlands :rolleyes:

GroteFoto-VPXKF3NQ.jpg

Greets.

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iamjv

Dalmatino, nice looking baby CIDP! Pretty soon it will totally take over that patio area....

What place is pictured in your avatar????

Jv

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plamfrong

dscf0030_4.jpg

Las Cruces, New Mexico, USDA zone 8a... about the coldest place they can grow and get enough heat to recover from partial damage most years. It's also very dry and sunny here in winter, which helps.

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Huaraz, Peru at 10,000' altitude

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Cusco, Peru at 10,600' (and apparently there's one above 11,000' outside the city, but I didn't have time to track it down). Any examples from a higher altitude than this?

phoenix_can_harbor.jpg

Brookings, Oregon. A monster

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plamfrong

phoenix_can_goldbeach.jpg

Finally... here's one a couple miles east of Gold Beach, Oregon. This is the most northerly really large one I know of on the North American West Coast. However a guy on Anderson Island, Washington had one that was getting quite impressive several years back and I haven't heard anything about it since.... if it's still there it might be starting to grow a trunk.

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iamjv

Some interesting adds Ian..... is that one near Gold Beach in the area called the 'Banana Belt' ??? Jv

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plamfrong
Some interesting adds Ian..... is that one near Gold Beach in the area called the 'Banana Belt' ??? Jv

That's what people call it who don't live there. It's a great climate for plants but not so great for (many) people. An acquaintance in Brookings (who may lurk here; I don't know) complains about this quite a bit. It rains 80 inches a year and fog can keep temperatures cold in summer. Personally I wouldn't mind having a few acres there to plant things on but I don't think I'd live there either. :)

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iamjv

Thanks Ian for the added info. I had read about the area in the past and some literature stated that this area was referred to as the banana belt.... I guess because it has the warmest climate of the region. It made me wonder how many palms one might find there.... Jv

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Dalmatino

Thanx JV!

The picture from my avatar is Dubrovnik in Croatia.

Greets!

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Exotic Life

Good looking pictures again everybody! :)

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Alberto

This is one of the first palm seeds that I germinated: (son Leonard and daughter Lydia)

post-465-1246573443_thumb.jpg

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iamjv

Good looking CIDP Alberto! There is something special about a plant that you obtained by germinating the seeds. Jv

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Kris

Dear Friends :)

Lovely visuals of my loved palm.. :drool:

Dear Alberto :)

Seeing your still,iam in a fix situation as to decide which is beautiful,your kids or your baby(CIDP) Since you germinated it,it does have a lot of significance too ! :hmm::)

Thanks for that beautiful still,which iam going to remember for many years to come ! :winkie:

Lots of love to you all,

Kris :)

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Axel Amsterdam
Dear Jv & Friends  :)

i have seen your lovely CIDPs that are growing in your lovely garden...i promise to upload my babies provided you all promise me that you will not laugh seeing their sizes... :D

here is the standard fruticas type...its around 2 years old as of now !  :)

Kris, is CIDP in your climate a fast grower? It would appear they don't need heat to grow well, but they don't object either.

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iamjv

Was driving around the back roads of south Texas last weekend and came across a pleasant surprise.... I came across a small, small town (Sinton) that had a lot of Phoenix palms (mostly CIDP) planted throughout the town. They were all relatively the same size so one can presume they are all about the same age. I suspect someone locally was growing these palms 50 or more years ago and they ended up all over town. These phoenix have certainly been tested over the years, to include the hard freezes of 1983 and 1989. I suspect the temperature in this town went down to 10F during those years. Pictured below are the phoenix that line the streets around a school in the center of town. Enjoy, Jv

post-362-1246712268_thumb.jpg

post-362-1246712417_thumb.jpg

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Kris
Dear Jv & Friends :)

i have seen your lovely CIDPs that are growing in your lovely garden...i promise to upload my babies provided you all promise me that you will not laugh seeing their sizes... :D

here is the standard fruticas type...its around 2 years old as of now ! :)

Kris, is CIDP in your climate a fast grower? It would appear they don't need heat to grow well, but they don't object either.

Dear Axel :)

Yes,i do feel that Cidp's are growing much faster than the date palms, P.sylversters & P.Rupicola's ! And i personally feel that these CIDP's are in state of confusion as to where they are growing...Since the temperature here is hot but not desert like,mild cool in winters which is usually wet.So year around they keep putting out spear after spear.Hope they do not break our compund wall,that is right behind it... :huh::lol: And the soil is clayee,but does not seem to mind at all ! :rolleyes:

And dear Jv :)

Lovely visuals as always_thanks very much ! :)

Lots of love,

Kris :)

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Exotic Life

Alberto,

How old is it now?

Robbin

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SouthSeaNate

Here are some recent shots taken over the weekend of the Southsea (UK) CIDP's...

04072009832.jpg

04072009836.jpg

04072009837.jpg

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Kris

Dear SouthSeaNate :)

Terrefic stills,and by all rights they must be called as jamboo...Beautiful trunk,nice leaf colour,and the leaves are closely net.

And thanks for posting those stills in big size ! :greenthumb:

Lots of love,

Kris :drool::yay:

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Kev Spence

Kris

Anyone send you a CIDP by movie.. :D

Do you like Phoenix dactylifera as well as I have a link on our GOTE forum here in the UK of a quite unusual one. :drool:

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plamfrong
Thanks Ian for the added info. I had read about the area in the past and some literature stated that this area was referred to as the banana belt.... I guess because it has the warmest climate of the region. It made me wonder how many palms one might find there.... Jv

One finds far fewer palms there than what could be possible... that's for sure! It's a geographically isolated area with relatively low individual incomes for most people; though there are a few keen gardeners in the area, I don't know that any of them are really into palms. I can't say I've seen many palms there besides a handful each of W. robusta, P.c., Trachycarpus (which is NOT happy with their salt laden winds) and a single (unhappy) queen palm, but I haven't been there in 7 years and more may have been planted since. A lot of other interesting plants there though... like Passiflora 'Coral Seas' covering a 100' long fence, Strelitzia, Norfolk Island Pine, etc. - stuff you sure wouldn't see in Seattle.

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Kris
Kris

Anyone send you a CIDP by movie.. :D

Do you like Phoenix dactylifera as well as I have a link on our GOTE forum here in the UK of a quite unusual one. :drool:

Dear Spencer :)

Thanks for that lovely video footage of such a beautiful place,with all those beauties... :drool: ...Where is that place ! looks very peaceful too.. :hmm:

And as for as video of date palms i love that too,but can you start a new thread or send that link as a PM,iam dieying to see that too.. :drool: And by the way most members who PM me call me as 'Date Palm Kris'.And most here know that iam a 'phoenix palm nut..' :blink:

Once again thanks very much for that video,And the visual-man(Me) is very happy. :lol:

Lots of love to you,

Kris :)

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iamjv

Nate great looking CIDPs there in the UK! Very impressive indeed. I take it this part of the country gets enough warmth in the summer time for the phoenix to flourish... Jv

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plamfrong
Nate great looking CIDPs there in the UK! Very impressive indeed. I take it this part of the country gets enough warmth in the summer time for the phoenix to flourish... Jv

I'm sure it has more to do with the absence of frost. P.c. has to be one of the most cool-tolerant palms in the world along with Trachycarpus. In the Andes, planted specimens flourish at higher altitudes than Ceroxylon does in the wild. Also I believe P.c. is thriving at Logan Botanic Gardens, Scotland.

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SouthSeaNate

I think one of the reasons that the Southsea CIDP's have grown so well is due to the annual mean temperature being one of the highest in the UK. Frosts are light & short lived here & summers are warmer than much of the UK (with higher sunshine levels too). The Southsea CIDP's are the first to have been recorded as fruiting & setting viable seed in the UK as well, even the ones over 100 years old on Tresco (off the Cornish coast) don't. So while I think ultimately it is down to milder winters, the warmer summers here (by UK standards) have obviously helped them too...

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plamfrong

Nate, certainly heat speeds them along. The high Andes probably have the benefit of greater year-round solar radiation than anywhere that most of us live, which might be considered an unfair advantage :mrlooney:

Any monthly temperature stats available for SouthSea? The mild winters sure do sound nice.

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SouthSeaNate
Nate, certainly heat speeds them along. The high Andes probably have the benefit of greater year-round solar radiation than anywhere that most of us live, which might be considered an unfair advantage :mrlooney:

Any monthly temperature stats available for SouthSea? The mild winters sure do sound nice.

Here are the statistics taken over the 30 year period from 1970 to 2000, though since 2000 six of the warmest years on record have been recorded & during the 1970's & 1980's some of the coldest winters were recorded, so the stats don't realy tie up with what we average out at now, but will give you some idea...

Jan: Av. High: 9C (48F) Av. Low: 5C (41F)

Feb: Av. High: 10C(50F) Av. Low: 5C (41F)

Mar: Av. High: 12C (54F) Av.Low: 6C (43F)

April: Av. High: 15C (59F) Av.Low: 8C (46F)

May: Av: High: 18C (64F) Av.Low:10C (50F)

June: Av. High: 21C (70F) Av. Low:13C (55F)

July: Av. High: 23C (73F) Av. Low:15C (59F)

Aug: Av. High: 24C (75F) Av. Low: 16C (61F)

Sep: Av. High: 20C (68F) Av. Low: 14C (57F)

Oct: Av. High: 17C (63F) Av. Low: 11C (52F)

Nov: Av. High: 14C (57F) Av. Low: 9C (48F)

Dec: Av. High: 10C (50F) Av. Low: 6C (43F)

We are normally ok if we get mainly westerly winds blowing in winter as it brings in milder air from the Atlantic, but if we get easterly winds they can drag in very cold air from Siberia & that is when we will get our coldest weather. Usually when we get a cold night the temperature the following day will not rise by much at all, similarly if we get mild air the night time temps don't drop by much from what we had during the day...

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plamfrong
Here are the statistics taken over the 30 year period from 1970 to 2000, though since 2000 six of the warmest years on record have been recorded & during the 1970's & 1980's some of the coldest winters were recorded, so the stats don't realy tie up with what we average out at now, but will give you some idea...

Jan: Av. High: 9C (48F) Av. Low: 5C (41F)

Feb: Av. High: 10C(50F) Av. Low: 5C (41F)

Mar: Av. High: 12C (54F) Av.Low: 6C (43F)

April: Av. High: 15C (59F) Av.Low: 8C (46F)

May: Av: High: 18C (64F) Av.Low:10C (50F)

June: Av. High: 21C (70F) Av. Low:13C (55F)

July: Av. High: 23C (73F) Av. Low:15C (59F)

Aug: Av. High: 24C (75F) Av. Low: 16C (61F)

Sep: Av. High: 20C (68F) Av. Low: 14C (57F)

Oct: Av. High: 17C (63F) Av. Low: 11C (52F)

Nov: Av. High: 14C (57F) Av. Low: 9C (48F)

Dec: Av. High: 10C (50F) Av. Low: 6C (43F)

We are normally ok if we get mainly westerly winds blowing in winter as it brings in milder air from the Atlantic, but if we get easterly winds they can drag in very cold air from Siberia & that is when we will get our coldest weather. Usually when we get a cold night the temperature the following day will not rise by much at all, similarly if we get mild air the night time temps don't drop by much from what we had during the day...

Looks like an agreeable climate for sure, nice warm nights in summer too. It's milder at night than where I live, year round.

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SouthSeaNate

Yes, our climate is quite unique here as Portsmouth is situated on an Island & is also the second most densely populated city in the UK, after London. So we do get fairly high night time lows in the summer months, similar to London, which generally is warmer than any part of the UK during summer...

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keoneu
4 a lot of seeds :)

That has to be the best looking CIDP that I have ever seen and we have a lot of them in CA. The red dates really set it off. How do they taste ?

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iamjv

A picture of the CIDPs at my daughter's apartment complex in Houston.... Jv

post-362-1248479104_thumb.jpg

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Justin

My big guy:

IMG_0262t.jpg

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iamjv

Justin, like the way that CIDP is sandwiched in between those two Dactylifera's ! Nice view! Jv

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