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Palmfarmer

Unusual Places you Believe palm trees could grow

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Palmfarmer

as title describes. I start with my list of what places i believe could work and you guys continue listing of a location/s and give your opinion.

Here are mine:

Faroe Islands, Falkland Islands and Sable Island, Canada. 

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Chester B

The southern islands of Alaska. Prince of Wales island, etc near Ketchikan and Sitka. 

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kinzyjr
1 hour ago, Chester B said:

The southern islands of Alaska. Prince of Wales island, etc near Ketchikan and Sitka. 

Ketchikan may have a few windmills: https://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/13080-palms-in-alaska/

Windmills were tried in Sitka but they unfortunately perished:

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/14689-death-of-the-northern-most-alaskan-palm/
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oasis371

Closer to home, from Cape Cod down to south, coastal Connecticut, Long Island, Metro NYC, down the Jersey Shore to Cape May, NJ, Delaware, and coastal points south, gradually expanding westward as one proceeds south (basically, minimum zone 6B/7A climates).

Edited by oasis371
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GottmitAlex

Greensboro, NC

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JLM

My hometown just northeast of Nashville, TN. A nursery had some sagos, pygmy dates, and some others that i have never seen before! I think the sagos will work but everything else is no bueno besides needle palms and sabal palmetto. Speaking of that i have seen Sabal palmetto near Nashville before outside of a makeshift mall off of HWY 386 called "The Streets of Indian Lake"

*Edit: Here is a drone pic at an event, pic from google maps. Looks like Sabal and Trachycarpus.

Palms of TN.PNG

Edited by JLM
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PalmTreeDude

I know this place already has a few palms scattered around so it’s not the most unusual place, but I feel like the Eastern Shore of Virginia, particularly Northampton County, could grow so many more solid 8a species. I’m not sure what the historical weather is like there but from what I can see you would think it would be full of hardy palms, while it seems like almost no one plants them. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
On 5/31/2020 at 2:51 PM, GottmitAlex said:

Greensboro, NC

There are tons of windmill palms and sabal minors growing here around Greensboro already. I've even got a washingtonia robusta in my yard, but I'll have to protect it during winter. My sabal minor "Lousiana," windmills, and sago require no protection.  There are a few Sabal Palmetto that are surviving at an apartment complex downtown as well. There is definitely potential here, the only thing stopping us is the popular local belief that palms belong at the beach only.

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Mr.SamuraiSword
16 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

I know this place already has a few palms scattered around so it’s not the most unusual place, but I feel like the Eastern Shore of Virginia, particularly Northampton County, could grow so many more solid 8a species. I’m not sure what the historical weather is like there but from what I can see you would think it would be full of hardy palms, while it seems like almost no one plants them. 

True, windmills and sabal minor are the most common though still rare in that area. Ive seen a couple ragged palmetto transplants and a couple healthier ones of smaller size and butia but again very very rare in that area.  You start seeing a couple queens too in that area.  Re Planted every summer of course. They do that as far south as a restaurant in Duck NC 

Edited by Mr.SamuraiSword
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donofriojim1

There are some old established needle palms and sabal minor in Cincinnati and along the Ohio river. I know if some in Louisville, Kentucky that actually produce volunteers as well!

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TexasColdHardyPalms

A customer of ours in st Louis has some older needles that have produced seed for a number of years. Nice plants.  My sister in law has a needle palms growing completely unprotected and neglected in Evansville, IN. 

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CodyORB

The Azores have an extremely high hardiness zone for their latitude, Ponta Delgada has a record low of 39F at 37 degrees north, almost as far up as Washington D.C! Coconuts could hypothetically take on!

Unfortunately it's perhaps a bit too cool in summer.

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SailorBold

Here locally palms are considered marginal and I agree mostly...although siting errors may be to blame...for certain species. I always adopted the thinking that if you plant in a good microclimate you will have no problems with hardiness etc.. of hardier species. As I've continued with my hobby I've learned how important other factors are as well. Ive mentioned it before but we generally all love those Pacific NW grown trachies... that thrive with the higher rainfalls in Washington and Oregon.. and further looking at the better looking trees locally here in the desert.. they thrive when planted with the supplemental run off from buildings. So that would be an unusual place.. at least in my mind.. for my local planting and future planting plans. 

Now to take it further.. in my cold winter climate.... I dont think a Washingtonia would survive in a location facing North.. or even facing Northeast.. its just too cold..(never attempted) and during the lower sun angle in the depth of winter.. there just isn't enough sun to keep a palm from freezing to death.. but Trachies seem to do fine in these exposures. I found a decent looking trachy.. and a rare needle palm in this yard that faces North... the needle most definitely gets sun all year.. but doesn't get rainfall run off from the house.  Looks crappy.. really.. even if it gets plenty of alkaline water from the grass. The trachy.. looks great.. and also is planted in the coldest location of the yard....makes you wonder whats possible with proper siting and how important it is.

Anyhow..as far as a different location.. I suppose it would be interesting to see palms in Santa Fe.. at an elevation of over 7200' !!

20200706_163453.jpg

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ky_palm064
On 6/4/2020 at 2:30 PM, donofriojim1 said:

There are some old established needle palms and sabal minor in Cincinnati and along the Ohio river. I know if some in Louisville, Kentucky that actually produce volunteers as well!

Here's my "Louisiana" planted on a south facing wall at my house between Louisville and Lexington Ky. No urban heat island and no protection after 3 years.sabal-minorlou.thumb.JPG.379b7315608e0135bd16557734475a58.JPGter 3 years.

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donofriojim1

Beautiful specimen! Alot more can grow in our region then people realize!

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Matt N- Dallas

Kansas City, Missouri z6.  Sabal minor ‘Mc curtain’ growing for 23 years and producing seed.  

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