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Coasta

hello everyone! Just had a question. I have had this canary island date palm in the ground for about a year and a half. It seems to be growing pretty slow as the trunk hasn't expanded a whole lot and the leaves don't seem to be getting longer. I do fertilize it and water it a few times a week. Any idea orare they this slow when they are small?

Also I notice that at some nurseries I go to the fronds are way longer than what mine are (45 inches), with about the same size trunk. Does this mean my canary island date palm won't have those awesome super long green fronds and they will be shorter? 

20200529_122835.jpg

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GottmitAlex

Hello! Well, Canary Island Date Palms by definition are slow growers. Not super slow like Trachycarpus, but still slow like Beccariophoenix alfredii palms.

The reason its leaves are shorter than the ones in the nursery is because yours is under full sun.  Its leaves will grow longer once it is fully acclimated.

Don't forget to water it often.

And congrats on a very beautiful palm.

Alex

Edited by GottmitAlex
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Coasta
7 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Hello! Well, Canary Island Date Palms by definition are slow growers. Not super slow like Trachycarpus, but still slow like Beccariophoenix alfredii palms.

The reason its leaves are shorter than the ones in the nursery is because yours is under full sun.  Its leaves will grow longer once it is fully acclimated.

Don't forget to water it often.

And congrats on a very beautiful palm.

Alex

Thanks so much Alex!! That makes sense now and puts my mind at ease! I love the nice long fronds on canary island date palms. :)

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Cikas
16 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Hello! Well, Canary Island Date Palms by definition are slow growers. Not super slow like Trachycarpus, but still slow like Beccariophoenix alfredii palms.

The reason its leaves are shorter than the ones in the nursery is because yours is under full sun.  Its leaves will grow longer once it is fully acclimated.

Don't forget to water it often.

And congrats on a very beautiful palm.

Alex

Trachycarpus is very fast growing palm. At least is here. 

CIDP are also not that slow. Give them regular water and they will grow very fast. 

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Fusca

Mine is about that size and steadily pushed new growth through the winter months and even more so now.  Once they start trunking they pick up even more speed.

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Palmfarmer
21 hours ago, GottmitAlex said:

Hello! Well, Canary Island Date Palms by definition are slow growers. Not super slow like Trachycarpus, but still slow like Beccariophoenix alfredii palms.

The reason its leaves are shorter than the ones in the nursery is because yours is under full sun.  Its leaves will grow longer once it is fully acclimated.

Don't forget to water it often.

And congrats on a very beautiful palm.

Alex

Slow can mean a lot of things i guess. this one was planted as a 1 foot plant or so and has been in the ground for 3-4 years. to me that is really fast, maybe we are in the perfect climate to grow CIDPs?

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Coasta
On 5/30/2020 at 7:06 AM, Cikas said:

Trachycarpus is very fast growing palm. At least is here. 

CIDP are also not that slow. Give them regular water and they will grow very fast. 

Awesome :). I built a better berm around it and have been soaking it. Hopefully it starts to speed up :) thank you!

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