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    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      This afternoon I took photos of my largest garden area, which I call, no kidding, "Garden Lot". We bought this 125' x 125' 3-lot site in 2011 before Cape Coral began to emerge from the Housing Bust, during which the Cape had the 2nd most foreclosed real estate market in the US. Houses remained vacant for years, residents fled the state and no one would spring for vacant land at any price. We bought this barren patch of weeds and fire ants with the intention of creating a garden that would block the view of the newly built LCEC electrical substation, also known as "Osama bin Laden's FL Vacation Compound" for its sandy pink stuccoed concrete block walls. The erector set is installed but to this day the substation remains unfinished and inoperable. Par for the course in Cape Coral.
      The first palms we planted were 5 Bizzies in 3-5g pots. We later added another Bizzie as point because it was so purple. Now it is silver and huge. Juxtaposed with and behind the Bizzies we planted Livistonas. We wanted all decoras but ended up with 2 decora, 2 australis and 1 mariae courtesy of a nursery with suspect expertise that shall remain unnamed. Fast forward 9 years and what you will see in the following photos is what you get.
      Vacant End Lot: Sabal sp and flowering bottlebrush & Cocos trunk, bananas, bottlebrush

      Garden Lot Views: south side

      Leaning Coconut of Irma

      Livistona mariae

      Sabal palmetto of unknown age. Lot mowers had hacked it to the ground 6x per year for possibly decades. It just barely fits inside our property line so we decided to give it a chance to grow. This is what we have after 9 years.

      Copenicia prunifera

      Livistona saribus w/black teeth

      Borassus flabellifer

      Cocos nucifera Dwarf Red Spicata Twins

      Copernicia alba, Chamaerops humilis & Agave americana mediopicta

      Dypsis decaryi

      Roystonea violacea (f) & Cocos nucifera Dwarf Red Spicata single

       
       
    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Today warmed up for the first time in over a week to nearly 80F. All my container palms from the lanai have been trapped inside since Christmas Eve and starting to show the effects of a dark, dry house. Before I let them free I swept and pressure sprayed the lanai for the first time in nearly a year to get rid of grime and spilled soil. Then put out all the palms and gave them a gentle shower and watering. Finally, I took the following photos, their last for 2020.
      Container Palms on Lanai, Cape Coral, FL, Dec. 2020

    • SW_FL_Palms
      By SW_FL_Palms
      Various vendors selling Palms, bromeliads, orchids, succulents, tropical & native  plants, pottery etc.
      9-2 on Saturday at Rotary Park in Cape Coral


    • Hillizard
      By Hillizard
      It's back: El Niño expected later this year, forecasters say: https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/its-back-el-ni%C3%B1o-expected-later-this-year-forecasters-say/ar-AAyFm39
      ".... In the U.S., a strong El Niño can result in a stormy winter along the West Coast, a wet winter across the South and a warmer-than-average winter in the Pacific Northwest and northern Rocky Mountains... El Niño is a periodic natural warming of ocean water in the tropical Pacific that impacts weather in the U.S. and around the world. Globally, the climate pattern can bring dry conditions to Indonesia, the Philippines and Australia...In South America, Brazil can get drought, while Argentina may get more rain...."
    • Matthew92
      By Matthew92
      Just thought I'd create a thread for anyone who wants to share their rainfall situation this season. I had FL mainly in mind, but if anyone from the Southeast or even somewhere else wants to share that's fine too.
      I just got a strong pop up storm that wasn't weakening or only sideswiping my location (which most of them have been so far). I love it. Classic summer storm: got a little of everything: wind, lightning, about 1.3 inches of rain. I wouldn't want to live somewhere that doesn't get storms like this.

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