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Jonathan Haycock

Adelaide’s (South Australia) mature Jubaea chilensis

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Jonathan Haycock

Well it’s been just over 1 year since we emigrated from U.K. to Australia. I’m still like a kid in a candy store looking at all these palms around me. I doubt the novelty will ever wear off. 

Thought I’d share with you some of the mature Jubaea chilensis I’ve spotted so far. If any of you know of more, please let me know.

This first one is located at Waite Arboretum.

627E806E-6954-48EA-9A42-2B00569ACB3F.jpeg

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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Jonathan Haycock

Burnside War Memorial Hospital garden.

A714A308-FB7D-408C-B5FC-76F357488C9A.jpeg

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Jonathan Haycock

Adelaide BG.

Apparently the palms crown has grown like this since a severe storm damaged it in 1983!!!

1F75B3CE-2304-42A6-9A86-C5B8FA7492EF.jpeg

DA1553EA-13DF-4F4E-B039-CAF908756419.jpeg

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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Jonathan Haycock

Pennington gardens, just outside the oval.

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Jonathan Haycock

Adelaide BG.

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Jonathan Haycock

Planted by Queen Mary in 1901, Adelaide BG.

6D38F8D2-3128-416A-B727-29E46882B71B.jpeg

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Jonathan Haycock

Apologies, not the best lighting. Adelaide BG.

9CAE3F72-F47E-4FAB-8901-C634915A4C0E.jpeg

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Jonathan Haycock

I’m off to visit another one today so will post a picture of this later.

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RJ

Thank you for sharing, what great pictures! 

 

 

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Allen

That's some mighty palms! Nice!

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8B palms

Mature Jubaea never get old to look at, truly amazing palms. 

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Jonathan Haycock

This one is extremely fertile. Payneham.

31F70541-B177-4B34-9D3E-CFF8B1D72BAB.jpeg

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Jonathan Haycock

Himeji Japanese garden.

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greysrigging
1 hour ago, Jonathan Haycock said:

This one is extremely fertile. Payneham.

31F70541-B177-4B34-9D3E-CFF8B1D72BAB.jpeg

C0D8E4DF-64DE-421F-83C2-211DA0D78ACA.jpeg

That is a monster ! ( the palm, not the kid....lol )
Adelaide, it would be fair to say, does not rate highly as a 'palmy' place among Aussie gardeners.... but I might have to reset my tropical prejudices towards you Croweaters ( Croweaters is how the rest of Australia sees South Australians.... the land was so poor and barren, the early pioneers resorted to eating crows to survive....) Mind you, they can and do make a decent Red and White in the Barossa Valley.

 

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Jonathan Haycock
1 hour ago, greysrigging said:

That is a monster ! ( the palm, not the kid....lol )
Adelaide, it would be fair to say, does not rate highly as a 'palmy' place among Aussie gardeners.... but I might have to reset my tropical prejudices towards you Croweaters ( Croweaters is how the rest of Australia sees South Australians.... the land was so poor and barren, the early pioneers resorted to eating crows to survive....) Mind you, they can and do make a decent Red and White in the Barossa Valley.

 

Not a huge variety of palms in the average garden here. Plenty of Washingtonia robusta and filifera, Syagrus romanzoffiana, Phoenix canariensis and roebelenii, and Archontophoenix cunninghamiana.

Outside of botanical gardens, I have seen the odd Butia ordorata, Brahea armata, Howea forsteriana, Dypsis decaryi, Dypsis lutescens, Phoenix dactylifera, Livistona australis, Livistona chinensis, Trachycarpus fortunei, Chamaerops humilis, Ravenea rivularis, and Wodyetia bifurcata. 

The Bangalows in general look terrible as people are growing them in full sun. When irrigated, Majestic palms look fantastic. I've only come across one group of Foxtails around town and they weren't in the best shape. 

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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8B palms

Hi Jonathan, as an ex-pat now living in northern Florida, I can relate, again back home I think I remember seeing a T. fortunei once in a blue moon and that was it, considered exotic.  It would seem being coastal that Adelaide is a warmer climate than north central Florida, no A. cuuinghamiana or Dypsis here, the continental cold air masses from Canada can plunge all the way to here and so provide a weather reality check.  Just 45 miles west of me is Cedar Key, what was responsible for supplying the pencil industry back in the day, with a lot of eastern red cedars.  They are probably a solid 9b, whereas Gainesville is 8b/9a.  I have tried pure Jubaea and B. decumbens but no luck even on a raised bed out in the open here, the humidity is just too much.  There are some impressive Butia x Jubaea and the reverse cross doing well in the south east US.  I just recently purchased a Butia yatay x Jubaea (Patric Schafer).  There are some nice examples of this cross growing in Texas and Switzerland.  The best cross I have with Jubaea is the Jubaea x Syagrus (this cross also by Patric), it has been a rocket and a very large Jubaea like trunk.  Keep enjoying the palms.  Keep sneaking in a mature Jubaea pic in, they are just so spectacular, so massive, hard to believe they were cut down to make a wine/syrup in the their native range, although I believe this is now very much sustained and regulated and the locals are actively growing these palms for enjoyment. Someday I'll make it there to see native stands of these.

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Jonathan Haycock
12 hours ago, 8B palms said:

Hi Jonathan, as an ex-pat now living in northern Florida, I can relate, again back home I think I remember seeing a T. fortunei once in a blue moon and that was it, considered exotic.  It would seem being coastal that Adelaide is a warmer climate than north central Florida, no A. cuuinghamiana or Dypsis here, the continental cold air masses from Canada can plunge all the way to here and so provide a weather reality check.  Just 45 miles west of me is Cedar Key, what was responsible for supplying the pencil industry back in the day, with a lot of eastern red cedars.  They are probably a solid 9b, whereas Gainesville is 8b/9a.  I have tried pure Jubaea and B. decumbens but no luck even on a raised bed out in the open here, the humidity is just too much.  There are some impressive Butia x Jubaea and the reverse cross doing well in the south east US.  I just recently purchased a Butia yatay x Jubaea (Patric Schafer).  There are some nice examples of this cross growing in Texas and Switzerland.  The best cross I have with Jubaea is the Jubaea x Syagrus (this cross also by Patric), it has been a rocket and a very large Jubaea like trunk.  Keep enjoying the palms.  Keep sneaking in a mature Jubaea pic in, they are just so spectacular, so massive, hard to believe they were cut down to make a wine/syrup in the their native range, although I believe this is now very much sustained and regulated and the locals are actively growing these palms for enjoyment. Someday I'll make it there to see native stands of these.

Hi Craig,

There were a number of reasons I emigrated to Australia, but would be kidding myself if I didn’t admit the main one being palms.

Since 2003, I’ve dreamt of creating my own Palmetum and thankfully I’m on track to achieve this. The plan is to move up to SE Queensland in a couple of years, purchase a few acres (5 would be perfect) and have Jubaea and Cocos growing in the same garden. Once the garden matures, I’ll spend my retirement creating Cocoseae hybrids. Hopefully, I’ll live long enough to include Jubaea in the mix.

I’ve just salvaged a 2 metre plus mature Lytocaryum weddellianum. If it survives the transplant, I’ll use it to develop my understanding of the hybridising process and hopefully create some interesting crosses.

Jubaea x Syagrus is the one hybrid I want more than any other. I had one in the U.K. (from Patrick), but it never recovered from the journey and perished soon after arrival. I don’t think there are many of these in Australia, if any. I’ve been made aware of one at Sydney’s BG, but couldn’t find it when I visited last year. 

I would love to locate a suitable Jubaea here in Adelaide to attempt the cross myself (not too tall, private/secluded garden, willing owners), but as expected this is proving difficult. The one at Waite Arboretum is perfect, but I’m struggling to get hold of anyone to ask permission.

Likewise, visiting native stands of Jubaea in Chile is definitely on the bucket list.

 

Edited by Jonathan Haycock
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Plantasexoticas
9 hours ago, Jonathan Haycock said:

Hi Craig,

There were a number of reasons I emigrated to Australia, but would be kidding myself if I didn’t admit the main one being palms.

Since 2003, I’ve dreamt of creating my own Palmetum and thankfully I’m on track to achieve this. The plan is to move up to SE Queensland in a couple of years, purchase a few acres (5 would be perfect) and have Jubaea and Cocos growing in the same garden. Once the garden matures, I’ll spend my retirement creating Cocoseae hybrids. Hopefully, I’ll live long enough to include Jubaea in the mix.

I’ve just salvaged a 2 metre plus mature Lytocaryum weddellianum. If it survives the transplant, I’ll use it to develop my understanding of the hybridising process and hopefully create some interesting crosses.

Jubaea x Syagrus is the one hybrid I want more than any other. I had one in the U.K. (from Patrick), but it never recovered from the journey and perished soon after arrival. I don’t think there are many of these in Australia, if any. I’ve been made aware of one at Sydney’s BG, but couldn’t find it when I visited last year. 

I would love to locate a suitable Jubaea here in Adelaide to attempt the cross myself (not too tall, private/secluded garden, willing owners), but as expected this is proving difficult. The one at Waite Arboretum is perfect, but I’m struggling to get hold of anyone to ask permission.

Likewise, visiting native stands of Jubaea in Chile is definitely on the bucket list.

 

Great photos of Jubaea Jonathan! One of the most impressive palms.  Loving your dream and ambition to creating the Palmetum and some amazing hybrids! 
 

I just saw recently that the Jubaea in Torquay gave fruited 

 

James

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Jonathan Haycock
11 hours ago, Plantasexoticas said:

Great photos of Jubaea Jonathan! One of the most impressive palms.  Loving your dream and ambition to creating the Palmetum and some amazing hybrids! 
 

I just saw recently that the Jubaea in Torquay gave fruited 

 

James

Thanks James.

I’ve visited that Torquay Jubaea a number of times over the years. Such an impressive and ultra rare sight in U.K. 

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8B palms

Anyone got a recent pic of this Jubaea?

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Jonathan Haycock
13 minutes ago, 8B palms said:

Anyone got a recent pic of this Jubaea?

Not the best angle or lightning, but this is 2017. Another Jubaea just behind it. I believe there were 3 originally planted, but 1 died.

DD33A945-8F10-4D30-BDE2-EC4C20808E49.jpeg

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8B palms

Stunning, doesn't look like there is even room in that garden for a second behind that monster, although it's on a grade, trig can be tricky.

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

It must be in the backyard ;) 

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Plantasexoticas

This is the latest picture I have seen of these Jubaea - with fruit 

3B00FA45-05EA-4A88-906F-09AA75D98A7F.jpeg

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RJ

Great pictures. At what point do Jubaea start to "Neck Down"? Is it a certain height or is it more determined by environmental factors, such as competition for light etc??? 

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8B palms

Any idea when this was planted and as what size., I mean they grow slowly, that could be 80-100 years old maybe more.  Still just stunning, in my humble opinion I would rather have a stand of them than coconut palms, but each to their own, thats what makes palm collecting fun, everyone has different likes, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

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Jonathan Haycock
10 hours ago, RJ said:

Great pictures. At what point do Jubaea start to "Neck Down"? Is it a certain height or is it more determined by environmental factors, such as competition for light etc??? 

I’ve not come across the term “neck down”, but I assume you mean the point at which the trunk starts to reduce in diameter. 

I believe this starts soon after the palm matures (flowers).

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Jonathan Haycock
9 hours ago, 8B palms said:

Any idea when this was planted and as what size., I mean they grow slowly, that could be 80-100 years old maybe more.  Still just stunning, in my humble opinion I would rather have a stand of them than coconut palms, but each to their own, thats what makes palm collecting fun, everyone has different likes, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

I would say at least 120 years old as I’ve read it was planted during the Victorian era. My guess would be late 19th century. 

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8B palms

That's just amazing, it will have seen gale force winds of over 100mph and significant freezes, I hope people are propagating the seeds from this bad boy. Just incredible.  

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howfam
On 5/17/2020 at 5:45 PM, Jonathan Haycock said:

Not the best angle or lightning, but this is 2017. Another Jubaea just behind it. I believe there were 3 originally planted, but 1 died.

DD33A945-8F10-4D30-BDE2-EC4C20808E49.jpeg

Can you give the streets some of these palms are located on. I'd like to view them on street view. /  Howfam

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EastCanadaTropicals
On 5/15/2020 at 7:54 PM, Jonathan Haycock said:

Burnside War Memorial Hospital garden.

A714A308-FB7D-408C-B5FC-76F357488C9A.jpeg

Worlds most underrated palm.

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EastCanadaTropicals
On 5/16/2020 at 7:38 AM, 8B palms said:

Hi Jonathan, as an ex-pat now living in northern Florida, I can relate, again back home I think I remember seeing a T. fortunei once in a blue moon and that was it, considered exotic.  It would seem being coastal that Adelaide is a warmer climate than north central Florida, no A. cuuinghamiana or Dypsis here, the continental cold air masses from Canada can plunge all the way to here and so provide a weather reality check.  Just 45 miles west of me is Cedar Key, what was responsible for supplying the pencil industry back in the day, with a lot of eastern red cedars.  They are probably a solid 9b, whereas Gainesville is 8b/9a.  I have tried pure Jubaea and B. decumbens but no luck even on a raised bed out in the open here, the humidity is just too much.  There are some impressive Butia x Jubaea and the reverse cross doing well in the south east US.  I just recently purchased a Butia yatay x Jubaea (Patric Schafer).  There are some nice examples of this cross growing in Texas and Switzerland.  The best cross I have with Jubaea is the Jubaea x Syagrus (this cross also by Patric), it has been a rocket and a very large Jubaea like trunk.  Keep enjoying the palms.  Keep sneaking in a mature Jubaea pic in, they are just so spectacular, so massive, hard to believe they were cut down to make a wine/syrup in the their native range, although I believe this is now very much sustained and regulated and the locals are actively growing these palms for enjoyment. Someday I'll make it there to see native stands of these.

You should try dypsis decipens in a good area.

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hopper

Not sure if you have been to this address before?

If you have nothing to do one day take a look.

29 Elmo Ave
Westbourne Park, South Australia

https://goo.gl/maps/LNhUmAzo7hFP7DhP6

 

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hopper

Another location is 5 Waite Ave Seacombe Heights, South Australia

Looks like the new owners have culled a heap of plants out of the garden.

Street view shows a better looking garden in 2009

https://goo.gl/maps/1nKxv7cvi1ionnWP6

 

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Jonathan Haycock
2 hours ago, hopper said:

Not sure if you have been to this address before?

If you have nothing to do one day take a look.

29 Elmo Ave
Westbourne Park, South Australia

https://goo.gl/maps/LNhUmAzo7hFP7DhP6

 

Thanks @hopper,

I see Roystonea regia (I think), Archontophoenix cunninghamiana, Phoenix dactylifera, and possibly Syagrus romanzoffiana. 

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Jonathan Haycock
2 hours ago, hopper said:

Another location is 5 Waite Ave Seacombe Heights, South Australia

Looks like the new owners have culled a heap of plants out of the garden.

Street view shows a better looking garden in 2009

https://goo.gl/maps/1nKxv7cvi1ionnWP6

 

Mass planting of Syagrus romanzoffiana, a few Archontophoenix (perhaps alexandrae?), and a Dypsis lutescens?

Edited by Jonathan Haycock

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Jonathan Haycock
1 hour ago, hopper said:

Another location. 

Nothing out of the ordinary for Adelaide.

2 Athelney Ave
Brighton SA 5048

https://goo.gl/maps/u4BqEVfMWxchA6X36

I spot a mass of Howea forsteriana, perhaps a Sabal, and a couple of Washingtonia.

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